Diane Venora

Diane Venora

Diane Venora Quick Links

Pictures Film RSS

Diane Venora and Kate Winslet - Diane Venora, Robert Chimento and Annie Burgstede Friday 23rd January 2009 at Santa Barbara International Film Festival Santa Barbara, California

Diane Venora and Kate Winslet
Diane Venora and Kate Winslet

Wolfen Review


Good
Check out Diane Venora, before she got weird and scary looking like Jessica Lange. Wolfen offers an interesting spin on the werewolf movie (these ones have ESP and can (perhaps) shapeshift at will), but it's got one too many negativized tracking shots and a few too many male frontal nudity glimpses to merit classic status. Albert Finney is exceptional, though, as a NYC detective who doesn't believe any of it and who desperately needs a haircut. Falls apart, alas, in the end.

William Shakespeare's Romeo Juliet (1996) Review


Very Good
Setting Shakespeare's tragedy of Romeo and Juliet to music by the likes of the Butthole Surfers probably has The Bard rolling in his grave, but what the hell, it's open season on the classics these days. I won't even pretend that I understand all the nuance and symbolism of Luhrmann's instantly popular retelling of the tale, but I will say that this is one of the most entertaining renditions of any Shakespearean work I've seen to date.

Closer to an update of West Side Story than anything else, what makes this rendition of the "two star-crossed lovers" saga stand out is dialogue which is largely faithful to the text set against a post-modern backdrop frighteningly reminiscent of Los Angeles. While it's a thrill to watch (if you can avoid a headache), it's maddeningly hard to follow and considerably self-conscious. Plus there's the issue of a soundtrack that's probably sold more copies than the film did tickets.... Will this version survive the test of time? Probably not, but it will forever stand out as an amazing and powerful experiment in filmmaking.

Continue reading: William Shakespeare's Romeo Juliet (1996) Review

The Young Girl And The Monsoon Review


Good
A finger-snapping swing soundtrack and the Manhattan skyline are accompanied by the sarcastic voice-over of a 13-year-old kid. Sounds like another one of those Woody Allen movies, or, a more appropriate comparison, Don Roos (Bounce). Writer-director James Ryan's first feature is a fairly traditional indie "relationship" film about a weekend dad, Hank (Terry Kinney, The House of Mirth), coming to terms with his coming-of-age daughter of 13 years, Constance (Ellen Muth), and his perky young model girlfriend (Mili Avital, Polish Wedding). They all learn from one another.

Did you ever notice that all those quirky (read: mundane) indies have such flashy titles? The Myth of Fingerprints, The Tao of Steve, Dream With the Fishes... this one happens to be called The Young Girl and the Monsoon. Don't be too quick to pigeonhole this particular "quirk" into a category of vapid mediocrity, though. Ryan shows a perceptive knack for small moments of familial tenderness found in unlikely places, including a Central Park boxing match between daddy and daughter that runs the gamut from rage to bliss. He arouses pathos in a Chinese restaurant sequence where Constance demands that daddy carry her to the door. Such, such are the joys of handling a teenage girl going insane on the bridge to adulthood.

Continue reading: The Young Girl And The Monsoon Review

Hamlet (2000) Review


Excellent
A new school of acting should be constructed based on the method of Ethan Hawke. I am the first to admit that I enjoy Ethan Hawke in almost anything he does. The reason I like him so much is because he brings the essence of the brooding soul to the screen so well. Hawke plays Tortured Guy so perfectly they should give an award at the Oscars every year and call it the "E. Hawke Award for Best Brooding Performance of the Year". As a natural-born brooder, the character of Hamlet perfectly suits Hawke because the role has always been given to older guys looking to validate their dramatic acting chops. Hawke's Hamlet is the Generation X Hamlet. A Hamlet that uses his "discontent" with the world as a razor against the neck of reality.

This updated 20th century Hamlet is brought to vivid realism by independent director Michael Almereyda. Almereyda places the play in the year 2000, creating the state of Denmark as a huge conglomerate, the slain king a CEO, and Hamlet as a digital video maker. This interpretation sounds almost like it's going to be as much fun as a ten-car pileup on the expressway; you want to turn your head away from in disgust but are strangely curious about what happened.

Continue reading: Hamlet (2000) Review

The Insider Review


Excellent
Listen up! A movie adapted from a magazine article about the making of a four-year old segment of a television program: Does this pitch have you hooked yet? No? Well, despite a potentially dry-as-dust premise, The Insider manages to rise above its inherent limitations and provides a compelling look inside the politics of 60 Minutes and the tobacco industry.

They say you should never see two things being made: Sausage and legislation. Add journalism to that list. I've been in this racket long enough to know that objectivity is painfully lacking in the places you expect to find it the most. Backroom deals make strange bedfellows of interest-conflicted parties (e.g. Time-Warner owns Entertainment Weekly magazine, which reviews Warner Bros. films, etc.) So when 60 Minutes producer Lowell Bergman (Pacino) decided to do a story about the hazards of cigarettes in 1996, he found himself embroiled in controversy.

Continue reading: The Insider Review

The Jackal Review


OK
If you can get past Diane Venora's laughable turn as a Russian agent (isn't that why we have Lena Olin?), you might find enough guilty pleasure in the cacophonous remake The Jackal to have a good time. Bruce Willis chews even more scenery as the villain than Richard Gere does as his Irish nemesis. Together they end up with quite an impressive body count -- watch especially for an early performance from the always entertaining Jack Black.

True Crime Review


Very Good
How'd I miss this one on the big screen? True Crime may have that feel of typical Clint Eastwood-self-promotion, but it is ultimately a considerably gripping meditation on the press and its role in the legal system. While elements feel a bit too much like Dead Man Walking, some excellent performances by Eastwood, Leary, and Woods make this a film worth watching. The story can be tepid and predictable at times, but overall it's a credible stab at crafting a legal thriller.

Race Against Time Review


Weak
Cary Elwes as bad guy? Eric Roberts as good guy? What could be more bizarre... except this farfetched tale of legalized suicide in the near future that has Roberts on the run from an Evil Medical Establishment run by Chris Sarandon(!) Some relatively big stars went to a lot of trouble to make a real mess of a movie that basically has Roberts on the run from armored guards for an hour and change.

Continue reading: Race Against Time Review

The 13th Warrior Review


Weak

After a year's worth of post-production monkeying, "The 13th Warrior" has finally come to theaters, and its still a big mess.

The screen adaptation of an early Michael Crichton novel about 10th Century Vikings called "Eaters of the Dead," its an abbreviated and shallow epic that comes off like an over-produced and dead-serious episode of the campy cult TV show "Xena: Warrior Princess."

Antonio Banderas stars in the ethnicity roulette role of Ahmed Ibn Fahdlan, an elegant Arab poet banished (as an ambassador) to northern Europe as punishment for diddling a sultan's wife. This is hurriedly explained in a slap-dash introductory voice-over that seems to substitute for at least 30 minutes of action wisely (but sloppily) pruned from film.

Continue reading: The 13th Warrior Review

Diane Venora

Diane Venora Quick Links

Pictures Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Suggested

Relive Kate Bush's 2014 Live Show With 'Before The Dawn'

Relive Kate Bush's 2014 Live Show With 'Before The Dawn'

The live album is set for released in November.

Benedict Cumberbatch Joins David Gilmour Onstage For 'Comfortably Numb'

Benedict Cumberbatch Joins David Gilmour Onstage For 'Comfortably Numb'

The 'Sherlock' and 'Doctor Strange' star joined Gilmour onstage at the Royal Albert Hall for a rendition of the Pink Floyd classic.

Advertisement
Chapter Three Of 'American Horror Story: Roanoke' Explains The Story Behind The Haunting (Spoilers)

Chapter Three Of 'American Horror Story: Roanoke' Explains The Story Behind The Haunting (Spoilers)

Time to learn what Kathy Bates' character has to do with all of this.

Advertisement

Diane Venora Movies

The Young Girl and the Monsoon Movie Review

The Young Girl and the Monsoon Movie Review

A finger-snapping swing soundtrack and the Manhattan skyline are accompanied by the sarcastic voice-over of...

Hamlet (2000) Movie Review

Hamlet (2000) Movie Review

A new school of acting should be constructed based on the method of Ethan Hawke....

Advertisement
The Insider Movie Review

The Insider Movie Review

Listen up! A movie adapted from a magazine article about the making of a...

The 13th Warrior Movie Review

The 13th Warrior Movie Review

After a year's worth of post-production monkeying, "The 13th Warrior" has finally come to theaters,...

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.