Diane Ladd

Diane Ladd

Diane Ladd Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS

Diane Ladd - 26th Annual Night of 100 Stars held at the Beverly Hills Hilton Hotel - Arrivals at Beverly Hilton - Beverly Hills, CA - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 28th February 2016

Diane Ladd

Diane Ladd - AARP's 15th Annual Movies for GrownUps Awards held at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel - Arrivals at Beverly Wilshire Hotel, Beverly Hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 8th February 2016

Diane Ladd

Diane Ladd - AARP's Movie For GrownUps Awards at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Monday 8th February 2016

Diane Ladd
David O. Russell and Diane Ladd
David O. Russell and Diane Ladd
Diane Ladd
Diane Ladd, Joy Mangano and David O. Russell
Diane Ladd, Joy Mangano and David O. Russell

Diane Ladd - Hallmark Channel and Hallmark Movies & Mysteries Winter 2016 TCA Press Tour - Arrivals at Tournament House - Pasadena, California, United States - Saturday 9th January 2016

Diane Ladd
Diane Ladd
Diane Ladd
Diane Ladd
Diane Ladd
Diane Ladd

Joy Review

Extraordinary

After Silver Linings Playbook and American Hustle, mercurial filmmaker David O. Russell reunites with Jennifer Lawrence, Bradley Cooper and Robert De Niro for an offbeat biopic about the woman who invented the Miracle Mop. It's such a quirky movie that it's destined to divide audiences, but there's magic in Russell's loose, inventive filmmaking style. And this lively story has a lot to say about the tenacity required to achieve the American dream.

Joy Mangano (Lawrence) is the only sensible person in her family, so she's been running the household most of her life. But now things are getting a bit too complicated, as her father Rudy (De Niro) moves back into the house after his second marriage fails, Joy's mother Terry (Virginia Madsen) does little but watch her favourite soap opera, Joy's ex-husband Tony (Edgar Ramirez) lives in the basement pursuing his dream of becoming a pop star, and her sister (Dascha Polanco) undermines everything she does. As Joy cares for her own children, it's only her grandmother (Diane Ladd) who has any confidence in her. And when she has a flash of inspiration and creates a self-wringing mop, getting it on the market is an uphill battle. Finally, she catches the attention of Neil (Bradley Cooper), who runs a brand new shopping network called QVC.

The story spans some 40 years, during which Russell gleefully parallels Joy's family chaos with the lurid soap on Terry's television. Of the people around Joy, only Grandma, Tony and her childhood buddy Peggy (Elizabeth Rohm) believe in her. So even though her dad's new girlfriend (the fabulous Isabella Rossellini) invests in her mop, no one thinks she'll achieve any real success. This means that Joy's journey is a series of sometimes outrageous obstacles both within and outside her immediate circle. And of course the biggest barrier is her gender, because almost no one accepts the idea that she might be a genius.

Continue reading: Joy Review

Diane Ladd - "Joy" New York Premiere - Red Carpet Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Monday 14th December 2015

Diane Ladd
Diane Ladd

Joy Trailer


Joy Mangano always wanted to be an inventor and, after getting married, having three children and then getting divorced, she finally decides to follow her dream. It's often the male entrepreneurs that people remember in history, but Joy proves that women can be just as powerful as she rises to become president of her own company, Ingenious Designs, and invents the cutting edge cleaning system, 'Miracle Mop'; all while taking care of a family on her own and running into some difficult circumstances along the way. Betrayed, occasionally on the wrong side of the law and suffering from many losses, Joy is the living embodiment of what doesn't kill you makes you stronger - and with millions of dollars in sales, she's certainly stronger.

Continue: Joy Trailer

HBO Cancels Laura Dern's 'Enlightened' After Two Seasons


Laura Dern Diane Ladd Luke Wilson

HBO has cancelled Laura Dern's dramedy 'Enlightened' after just two seasons. Though critics loved the series, it failed to pull in large audience numbers and - as we're now well aware - that won't cut it in the ruthless world of American television. "It was a very difficult decision," a rep for HBO told E! Online in a statement. "We've decided not to continue Enlightened for a third season. We're proud of the show and we look forward to working with Mike White and Laura Dern in the future."

In fairness, Enlightened was expected to get the chop during HBO's bloody cull last year when Hung, How To Make It In America and Zach Galifianakis' Bored To Death were all cancelled. As mentioned, the show was a big hit with critics and Dern - one of America's finest television actresses - won the Golden Globe for Best Actress In A Comedy Series for the first season. The show was also nominated for Best Comedy Series that same year.

The show followed the story of Amy Jellicoe (Dern), a self-destructive executive who tries to get her life back together after the implosion of her professional life and a subsequent philosophical awakening in rehabilitation. She moved  back in with her mother (played by her real-life mom Diane Ladd) and reconnects with her ex-husband Levi (played by Luke Wilson) who is also struggling with his own demons and addictions. 

Continue reading: HBO Cancels Laura Dern's 'Enlightened' After Two Seasons

The World's Fastest Indian Review


Very Good
"You live more in five minutes on a bike... than some people live in their lifetime," says the plucky, gravel-voiced Burt Munro (Anthony Hopkins), early on in writer-director Roger Donaldson's The World's Fastest Indian. That line and the scene containing it eloquently sum up Munro's fearless devotion to his lifelong love: speed racing, specifically on his re-conditioned 1920s-era Indian motorcycle. World's Fastest is part biopic, part road movie, part triumph of the sprit moviemaking, but, underneath all that, it's a tribute to the aging Munro, whose grit and tenacity elevated him for small-time obscurity to the status of motorcycling legend--the holder of several land speed records.

Donaldson's movie focuses on Munro's 1967 odyssey from his remote New Zealand town to his record-setting speed trials in Utah's Bonneville Salt Flats. Though plagued by a heart ailment, Munro soldiers on, modifying his ancient Indian motorcycle using nothing more than junkyard parts and his try-anything chutzpah. Backed by the goodwill of his townsfolk, Munro ships off to Los Angeles where he commences his cross-country trek towards Utah and the record books.

Continue reading: The World's Fastest Indian Review

Something Wicked This Way Comes Review


Good
Try as I might to get into this movie, based on the classic Ray Bradbury tale, I've found myself blocked by its off-putting ways. The guts of the piece are there: Evil carnival comes to town and wreaks havoc on everyone who lives there. But something comes up short that I can't quite place. My best guess: The focus of the film is on two Hardy Boys-like kids who play detective. They aren't very bright nor very likeable, and they detract from some otherwise fun set pieces. In fact, the film is by far at its best when they're nowhere to be seen.

The World's Fastest Indian Review


Very Good
"You live more in five minutes on a bike... than some people live in their lifetime," says the plucky, gravel-voiced Burt Munro (Anthony Hopkins), early on in writer-director Roger Donaldson's The World's Fastest Indian. That line and the scene containing it eloquently sum up Munro's fearless devotion to his lifelong love: speed racing, specifically on his re-conditioned 1920s-era Indian motorcycle. World's Fastest is part biopic, part road movie, part triumph of the sprit moviemaking, but, underneath all that, it's a tribute to the aging Munro, whose grit and tenacity elevated him for small-time obscurity to the status of motorcycling legend--the holder of several land speed records.

Donaldson's movie focuses on Munro's 1967 odyssey from his remote New Zealand town to his record-setting speed trials in Utah's Bonneville Salt Flats. Though plagued by a heart ailment, Munro soldiers on, modifying his ancient Indian motorcycle using nothing more than junkyard parts and his try-anything chutzpah. Backed by the goodwill of his townsfolk, Munro ships off to Los Angeles where he commences his cross-country trek towards Utah and the record books.

Continue reading: The World's Fastest Indian Review

Wild At Heart Review


OK
Was there any film so anxiously awaited in the late 1980s and early 1990s as Wild at Heart? The picture was released to a cult that had just been born: that of its director, David Lynch, whose Blue Velvet, in 1986, had reaped an enthusiastic following among the mainstream hipsters who had missed Eraserhead in 1977, and whose budding appetite for Lynch's singular brand of the macabre had been whetted by the prime-time ghoulishness of 1990's Twin Peaks. Wild at Heart's Palme d'Or win at Cannes just before its 1990 release only tantalized more; and after what seemed for Lynch's starving fans a nearly eternal wait, the film opened at last to high expectations, but decidedly mixed reviews.

Wild at Heart was puzzling, because it was screwed up and it was hard to figure out why. Time - and, 14 years later, the DVD release - helps to clear up that central enigma. Based very loosely on Barry Gifford's novel, this manic, Southern Gothic road movie now seems too deliberately weird. And in retrospect the cause seems to be that its creator, a strange man if the available evidence of his films is to be believed, and one who then was only recently revered as a certain type of genius, was trying so hard just to be himself.

Continue reading: Wild At Heart Review

The Wild Angels Review


Terrible
Hell's Angels maraud California until one of their pals (Bruce Dern) bites it. Then his Nazi funeral turns ugly. That's the sum of it. Peter Fonda, Nancy Sinatra, and Diane Ladd can't save this pile of junk, a train wreck of epic proportions. It manages to be exploitative, lifeless, and boring at the same time! Truly, one of the most awful movies ever made, despite its pedigree (Venice Film Festival, Peter Bogdonavich rewrite, banned in Denmark, etc.).

Chinatown Review


Extraordinary
I do my homework. All right. So I don't always do my homework, but when it comes to film critiquing, I'm pretty good at doing my homework. So, since The Ninth Gate is being released later this week, I figured I should check out the Chinatown DVD, in order to get background on Roman Polanski's career.

Ain't homework painful?

Continue reading: Chinatown Review

28 Days Review


Good

Director Betty Thomas' name in the opening credits of "28 Days" came as a big relief leading in to what looked like a soft-pedaled, politically corrected comedy about a happy-go-unlucky drunk -- played by button-cute Sandra Bullock -- wise-cracking her way through rehab.

It was reassuring to see that the woman holding the reins was a filmmaker who certainly knows how to turn a sow's ear into a silk purse. I mean, if she could make Howard Stern not only presentable but borderline sentimental (and without a hint of saccharine whitewash) in "Private Parts," surely a touchy subject like alcoholism is safe in her hands.

And so it is. Striking a sure-footed balance between its addiction woe and impudent humor, Thomas isn't afraid to scoff at twelve-steppers and include jests of questionable taste while still pulling off a story of a woman's difficult personal journey toward sobriety.

Continue reading: 28 Days Review

Diane Ladd

Diane Ladd Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Diane Ladd Movies

Joy Movie Review

Joy Movie Review

After Silver Linings Playbook and American Hustle, mercurial filmmaker David O. Russell reunites with Jennifer...

Joy Trailer

Joy Trailer

Joy Mangano always wanted to be an inventor and, after getting married, having three children...

28 Days Movie Review

28 Days Movie Review

Everyone knows that writers are drunks. I mean, I'm drunk right now. I'm...

Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore Movie Review

Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore Movie Review

The early 1970s were a great time for American movies, but one segment of the...

28 Days Movie Review

28 Days Movie Review

Director Betty Thomas' name in the opening credits of "28 Days" came as a big...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.