Devon Aoki

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Devon Aoki leaves Madeo restaurant

Devon Aoki - Devon Aoki leaves Madeo restaurant - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 25th May 2014

Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki

Devon And Steve Aoki Battling Their Father's Widow Over Estate


Devon Aoki Steve Aoki

Devon Aoki (model and actress) and her brother Steve Aoki (DJ) are currently embroiled in a bitter fight with their father's widow over his leftover fortune. Hiroaki 'Rocky; Aoki, father of Devon and Steve, was a Japanese restaurant founder before he died in 2008. His widow, Keiko Ono Aoki, has stated that his six children stole 3 million USD from him while he was dying in the hospital.

Related: Devon Aoki Is In 'Sin City 2: A Dame To Kill For' - Watch The Trailer 

Keiko was the third wife of Hiroaki, and received his 35 million USD estate in 2013, although, according to the 'New York Post', she now wants to take back the money she accuses his children of stealing. All of the six children disagree, though, stating that the money came to them from a trust-fund which Keiko had no control over. 

Continue reading: Devon And Steve Aoki Battling Their Father's Widow Over Estate

2013 amfAR Inspiration Gala Los Angeles Presented By MAC Viva Glam

Devon Aoki - 2013 amfAR Inspiration Gala Los Angeles Presented By MAC Viva Glam At Milk Studios - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 13th December 2013

Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki

2013 amfAR Inspiration Gala

Devon Aoki - Celebrities attend 2013 amfAR Inspiration Gala at Milk Studios. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 12th December 2013

Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki

2nd Annual BABY2BABY Gala

Devon Aoki - The Second Annual Baby2Baby Gala to raise awareness and funds for the Los Angeles based non profit organization - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 9th November 2013

Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki

The 2nd Annual Baby2Baby Gala

Devon Aoki - The 2nd Annual Baby2Baby Gala - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 10th November 2013

Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki
Devon Aoki

Video - Heather Graham Looks Breathtaking In Azure Blue Number - 2012 CFDA Fashion Awards Part 2


Arrivals for the 2012 Cfda Fashion Awards at Alice Tully Hall included model Karen Elson with shoe designer Tabitha Simmons, designer Betsey Johnson with daughter Lulu, actress Heather Graham with DKNY founder Donna Karan, model/actress Devon Aoki with Alice + Olivia designer Stacey Bendet and actress Mandy Moore with designer Lela Rose.

Karen looked stunning in a dark green, belly-showing number that complimented her red locks while standing next to Tabitha who opted for a unique gold jacket with a splendid peacock design. Betsey Johnson in an OTT shiny gold dress couldn't outshine her towering daughter in stunning blue satin. Whilst some arrivals went eccentric for the Awards event, such as Stacey Bendet in her kaleidoscopic floor-length gown, others dazzled in simpler attire such as Heather Graham's sheer, azure blue dress

Mutant Chronicles Review


Unbearable
She's become something of an icon in the worst possible sense. Glowering in the background, her face a mask of fury, her eyes piercing and yet remote, this young woman is almost always adept in both samurai-styled swordplay as well as gymnastics skills that rival anything seen on Earth. She speaks little, never dates, and almost always has a torturous family history. You've seen her kicking her way through almost every futuristic action film to hit screens this decade -- from The Matrix to The Chronicles of Riddick. Meet the new sci-fi femme fatale. She's been exclusively designed by Tinseltown engineers to whet the appetites (and other parts) of the largely male, Internet-based fanboy universe.

And God is she getting dull.

Continue reading: Mutant Chronicles Review

War Review


Weak
The problem with being a connoisseur of B-grade action movies is that eventually you start applying the kind of elevated expectations that this genre is supposed to guard against. You get so accustomed to, say, a late-summer Jason Statham movie providing more thrills than many of its big-budget counterparts that suddenly Statham and Jet Li costarring in a chintzy action picture becomes a victim of perhaps unreasonable expectations.

That pairing of B-movie titans, somewhat inexplicably titled War, is neither a team-up nor a battle royale; it's actually kind of like a low-budget Heat knockoff, with a far larger cast and a far snakier plot than is warranted by the stars' specific and unpretentious skill sets. It begins with FBI agent Jack Crawford (Statham) losing his partner (Terry Chen) to a mysterious assassin called Rogue; so far, so cheesy, so good. But when Rogue (Jet Li) re-appears three years later, involved in a convoluted (or maybe just dull) bit of Asian-mob rivalry between the Yakuza and Triad families, momentum falters. Crawford attempts to navigate the underworld and bring his nemesis to justice, while geeks in the audience become confused by Rogue's inability to absorb Jason Statham's mutant fighting powers.

Continue reading: War Review

Doa: Dead Or Alive Review


Grim
Dead or Alive could be the most literal cinematic interpretation of a computer game ever made. In the film, three young women fight in a combat tournament called DOA: Dead or Alive, held on a top secret, technologically advanced Pacific island resort. As they kick, punch and scratch their way through a smorgasbord of fighters (and suitors), they are recorded by the island's invasive video cameras and watched on multiple screens in a computer laboratory by tournament director Donovan (Eric Roberts). Here's where it gets literal. Donovan injects all competitors with nanobots that record data from their blood stream. This data is relayed back into the computer system so that when Donovan (and the audience) views the fights, incongruous colored bars hover in the upper right and left corners of the screen, indicating the power levels of each competitor. Each time a player is hit, the bar reduces. As the bar is diminished, the fighter becomes more sluggish, until it disappears completely and the fighter collapses. When this happens, giant red and yellow words jump onto the screen and announce who won, who lost, and how.

Clearly, the filmmakers have respected the basic format of the DOA computer game and respected its fans. However, in respecting the computer game director Cory Yuen has disrespected cinema and forgotten the basic needs of a decent film: a good story, interesting characters and some sort of drama. DOA occasionally touches on all of these points, but kicks away in favor of a slavish desire to package the entire production in the style of its source material.

Continue reading: Doa: Dead Or Alive Review

2 Fast 2 Furious Review


Grim
Two years ago, Rob Cohen's The Fast and the Furious tapped into a subculture of gearheads and speed freaks as it transformed Vin Diesel and Paul Walker into overnight sensations. Its $145 million domestic gross guaranteed a sequel, even after Vin hit the brakes on his involvement.

Not surprisingly, Diesel's presence is missed in John Singleton's lame 2 Fast 2 Furious. Seriously, did anyone leave the first Furious wondering what happened to Walker's cardboard cutout cop character? If anything, the sequel should've tracked down Diesel's gruff-and-tumble Dominic Toretto, who sidestepped the long arm of the law after proving his loyalty to Walker's undercover officer, Brian O'Conner.

Continue reading: 2 Fast 2 Furious Review

2 Fast 2 Furious Review


Grim
Two years ago, Rob Cohen's The Fast and the Furious tapped into a subculture of gearheads and speed freaks as it transformed Vin Diesel and Paul Walker into overnight sensations. Its $145 million domestic gross guaranteed a sequel, even after Vin hit the brakes on his involvement.

Not surprisingly, Diesel's presence is missed in John Singleton's lame 2 Fast 2 Furious. Seriously, did anyone leave the first Furious wondering what happened to Walker's cardboard cutout cop character? If anything, the sequel should've tracked down Diesel's gruff-and-tumble Dominic Toretto, who sidestepped the long arm of the law after proving his loyalty to Walker's undercover officer, Brian O'Conner.

Continue reading: 2 Fast 2 Furious Review

D.E.B.S. Review


Grim
Somewhat like watching the Disney Channel's girl-power prime-time lineup through a muddled exploitation-lite filter, D.E.B.S. is a patently ridiculous teen-spies scenario that's played mostly for laughs but oddly enough only works when it's being downright sincere.

The film imagines that there's an entire wing of the national intelligence apparatus composed of nubile young women in tarty schoolgirl outfits (knee socks, plaid miniskirts, the whole bit) selected by how they answered questions buried in the SATs that secretly test for espionage aptitude. The starring quartet of hotties soon to graduate from the D.E.B.S. academy are: straight-A and dishwater dull Amy (Sara Foster, her blonde hair making her the star), chain-smoking and slutty Domique (Devon Aoki, sporting a respectable French accent), love-starved and not-too-bright underachiever Janet (Jill Ritchie) and their over-the-top bitchy leader Max (Meagan Good, trying too hard).

Continue reading: D.E.B.S. Review

Sin City Review


OK
Innovative and dazzling in its absolute loyalty to thevisual style of its inspiration, "Sin City" brings comic bookpages alive to a degree that is unprecedented in movie history.

A triptych of dark, violent tales set in a fallen cityof corruption and grime, the film is a collaboration between film directorRobert Rodriguez (of "Desperado" and "SpyKids" fame) and graphic novelist FrankMiller (responsible for the gritty reinventions of Batman and Daredevil),whose unique touch in the unusual role of co-director is unmistakable.

Pages from the "Sin City" books were clearlyused as storyboards for the stunning, stark black-and-white cinematography,which features exclamation points of illustrative color: the golden tressesof a beautiful femme fatale, white-on-black silhouettes, red splashes ofblood from brutal murders that occur just out of frame.

His influence can also be felt (along with that of Rodriguezpal Quentin Tarantino, who is curiously credited as a "special guestdirector") in the "Pulp Fiction"-like plot structure thatlends itself well to the interconnected short stories, each of which makeup in atmosphere what they sometimes lack in profundity.

Continue reading: Sin City Review

2 Fast 2 Furious Review


Grim

When even a skillful writer-director with soul to spare like John Singleton ("Boyz 'N' the Hood," "Shaft") can't lend a street-racing movie an ounce of personality, it becomes abundantly clear that the trendy genre never had anything worthwhile to offer in the first place.

Stepping behind the camera for the carbon-copy sequel "2 Fast 2 Furious," Singleton frontloads the film with one scene of enjoyable B-movie flair -- a midnight drag race punctuated by car-wake camera shakes, colorful background-blur effects, and cheesy close-ups of revving tachometers, needle-buried speedometers and bad actors squinting with determined concentration as they grip the wheel.

But as soon as the movie is sideswiped by its imbecilic plot, Singleton loses his ironic sense of style and the flick crashes and burns.

Continue reading: 2 Fast 2 Furious Review

Devon Aoki

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