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Dermot Mulroney - 66th Annual Writer's Guild Awards Los Angeles Ceremony at JW Marriott - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 2nd February 2014

Dermot Mulroney

Dermot Mulroney - 66th Annual Writer's Guild Awards Los Angeles Ceremony at JW Marriott - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 1st February 2014

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Dermot Mulroney

Dermot Mulroney - NBC TCA Winter 2014 Press Tour - Pasadena, California, United States - Sunday 19th January 2014

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Dermot Mulroney and Tharita Cesaroni - The 20th Annual Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Awards held at The Shrine Auditorium - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 18th January 2014

Dermot Mulroney and Tharita Cesaroni
Dermot Mulroney and Tharita Cesaroni
Dermot Mulroney and Tharita Catulle
Dermot Mulroney and Tharita Catulle

Dermot Mulroney and Tharita Catulle - The 71st Annual Golden Globe Awards - Weinstein Party at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 13th January 2014

Dermot Mulroney and Tharita Catulle
Dermot Mulroney and Tharita Catulle
Dermot Mulroney and Tharita Catulle
Dermot Mulroney and Tharita Catulle

Dermot Mulroney - The New York premiere of August: Osage County held at the Ziegfeld Theatre - Arrivals. - New York, New York, United States - Thursday 12th December 2013

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Dermot Mulroney

Tharita Catulle and Dermot Mulroney - Celebrities attend 'TrevorLIVE LA' honoring Jane Lynch and Toyota for the Trevor Project at Hollywood Palladium. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 8th December 2013

Tharita Catulle and Dermot Mulroney
Tharita Catulle and Dermot Mulroney
Tharita Catulle and Dermot Mulroney
Tharita Catulle and Dermot Mulroney
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Tharita Catulle and Dermot Mulroney

Thanita Catulle and Dermot Mulroney - The Weinstein Company's "August Osage County" Screening Benefiting Children Mending Hearts & The Episcopal School Of Los Angeles At the Landmark Theater - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 5th December 2013

Thanita Catulle and Dermot Mulroney
Dermot Mulroney
Dermot Mulroney
Dermot Mulroney and Juliette Lewis
Dermot Mulroney and Juliette Lewis
Thanita Catulle and Dermot Mulroney

Dermot Mulroney - Xbox One official launch celebration held at Milk Studios - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 21st November 2013

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Dermot Mulroney

Dermot Mulroney - GQ Men Of The Year Party at The Wilshire Ebell Theatre - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 12th November 2013

Dermot Mulroney
Dermot Mulroney

Dermot Mulroney - AFI FEST 2013 Presented By Audi - "August Osage County" Premiere at TCL Chinese Theatre - Hollywood, California, United States - Saturday 9th November 2013

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Dermot Mulroney

Tharita Catulle and Dermot Mulroney - 17th Annual Hollywood Film Awards held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, CA. 21-10-2013 - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Monday 21st October 2013

Tharita Catulle and Dermot Mulroney
Dermot Mulroney
Tharita Catulle and Dermot Mulroney
Tharita Catulle and Dermot Mulroney
Chris Cooper, Margo Martindale and Dermot Mulroney
Dermot Mulroney

Dermot Mulroney - Toronto International Film Festival - 'August: Osage County' - Premiere - Toronto, Canada - Tuesday 10th September 2013

Dermot Mulroney and Tharita Catulle - August Osage County premiere at Roy Thomson Hall during the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival. - Toronto, Canada - Monday 9th September 2013

Dermot Mulroney and Tharita Catulle
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Dermot Mulroney
Dermot Mulroney

Dermot Mulroney - The Los Angeles premiere of 'Jobs' at Regal Cinemas - Outside Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 13th August 2013

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Dermot Mulroney

Dermot Mulroney - Arrivals for the JOBS Movie Premiere in Downtown, Los Angeles. - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Wednesday 14th August 2013

Dermot Mulroney - Los Angeles Premiere of "JOBS" held at the Regal Cinemas LA Live Stadium 14 - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Tuesday 13th August 2013

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Dermot Mulroney and Tharita Catulle - Screening Of Open Road Films And Five Star Feature Films' "Jobs" - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 14th August 2013

Dermot Mulroney and Tharita Catulle
Dermot Mulroney and Tharita Catulle
Dermot Mulroney
Dermot Mulroney and Tharita Catulle
Dermot Mulroney and Tharita Catulle
Dermot Mulroney

Dermot Mulroney - Hollywood Foreign Press Association's 2013 Installation Luncheon Held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Tuesday 13th August 2013

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Dermot Mulroney - The Screen Actors Guild Foundation hosts it's 4th Annual Los Angeles Golf Classic - Burbank, California, United States - Monday 10th June 2013

Dermot Mulroney
Dermot Mulroney

Georgia Rule Review


Bad
We have reached the point where Lindsay Lohan's reputation eclipses her resume. The still-young actress, once recognized for her impressive acting ability, must now contend with an audiences' pre-conceived assumption that she is the party-hungry wild child tabloid pushers make her out to be. Sadly, Lohan's latter identity is now winning the battle.

It doesn't help that Lohan's latest film, Georgia Rule, endured documented production delays due in part to her childish on-set antics. And now that we're able to see the finished product, we realize the star plays... well, a coarse version of the pseudo-diva we've grown accustomed to. Without judging whether her scandalous exploits are accurate, it's difficult to hear Lohan utter lines like, "You can't stop what is done to you. You can only survive it," without applying such words of wisdom to her well-publicized, off-camera existence.

Continue reading: Georgia Rule Review

Where The Money Is Review


Good
At more than one point in his career, Paul Newman has been the ultimate con man. The Sting, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Cool Hand Luke, The Hustler, and The Color of Money all epitomized this master of smooth talk and wily ways. But the successes of all of his past films and all of their cons have one common denominator: a memorable and talented supporting cast. In The Hustler, Jackie Gleason played Minnesota Fats, who proved to be a worthy nemesis by outsmarting the cocky and more talented Newman. Tom Cruise, in The Color of Money, was like an apprentice learning from the master sorcerer, as Newman molded Cruise into an effigy of his old self. While Newman always emerged the star, he would continually share the spotlight, so that none of those movies became one-dimensional.

Newman's latest film, Where the Money Is, directed by Marek Kanievska (Less Than Zero), unfortunately lacks the supporting cast for Newman to thrive as the luminary "hustler." In the film, Newman plays Henry Manning, a former bank robber who plans to break out of prison by faking a stroke. When he is transferred to a minimum-security nursing home, he thinks he's home free. However, the woman assigned to take care of him, Carol Ann McKay (Linda Fiorentino - Men in Black) suspects that he's a fake and attempts to lure him out of his trance so he will help her in a burglary with her and her husband Wayne (Dermot Mulroney - Copycat, My Best Friend's Wedding). She goes to some outrageous lengths to keep him from playing possum, but when she finally awakes the bank robbing legend, she faces a challenge that could change her life.

Continue reading: Where The Money Is Review

The Family Stone Review


Weak
The Family Stone wants to be many things. It wants to be funny and touching and warm-hearted, like any good holiday film, but aspiration is not achievement and The Family Stone proves it.

Written and directed by Thomas Bezucha, the story starts with Everett Stone (Dermot Mulroney) bringing his uptight girlfriend, Meredith (Sarah Jessica Parker), home for Christmas to meet his family. The Stones take an immediate disliking to Meredith -- she's corporate, they're earthy -- forcing her into a downward spiral where she tries ever harder to win their approval. Sort of like Meet the Parents... at Christmastime... without the laughs.

Continue reading: The Family Stone Review

My Best Friend's Wedding Review


Very Good
An out-and-out blatant chick flick from the first frame on, My Best Friend's Wedding will be as enjoyable to its female patrons as it is frustrating to its male ones. Yes, Julia Roberts is back, and in fine form -- playing Julianne, the bad girl, against Cameron Diaz's squeaky-clean bride-to-be (Kim). The best friend in question is Michael (Dermot Mulroney), Roberts's long-time confidant. When Michael reveals his imminent marriage, Julianne develops a jealousy to be reckoned with, and makes it her life's work to break up the couple.

In addition to its problems with alienating male viewers, the real flaw in My Best Friend's Wedding is the lack of chemistry between the Mulroney and Roberts. While I'd probably be a little shy smooching on Julia, hey, that's no excuse for a seasoned pro. Then there's also the minor detail that the trailer tells the story better than the film -- leaving some gaping plot holes -- but who's quibbling? Roberts is the one to watch here, along with Rupert Everett as her gay editor and co-conspirator in this mess. It's really these two that make this picture fun -- and funny. And it's in Wedding's fall-down funny moments that the picture really shines.

Continue reading: My Best Friend's Wedding Review

Copycat Review


Very Good
Hot on the heels of Seven, another very unconventional thriller has arrived in theaters: Copycat, an equally creepy film with the thematic premise that there really are an awful lot of sick people out there.

Judging from Copycat, there's more of them than we're giving credit to. Copycat is the story of a serial killer apparently chasing psychologist Helen Hudson (Sigourney Weaver). The only problem is, some 13 months earlier, another killer (Harry Connick Jr.) almost got her, and the experience was enough for her to lock herself into her snazzy apartment for good. When killer #2 comes around, two detectives, M.J. (Holly Hunter) and Ruben (Dermot Mulroney) try to solve the mystery. This is a much more disturbing and difficult task than it first seems, entangling everyone in an intensely engaging plot full of surprises and "rule-breaking" twists.

Continue reading: Copycat Review

About Schmidt Review


Weak
See Jack brood. See Jack rebelliously piss standing up (no, no frontal nudity). See Jack cry. Notice the use of the name "Jack" and not Schmidt because, no matter how much Jack Nicholson is supposed to be restrained from his normally boisterous persona, the amount of tightly shot footage in About Schmidt dedicated specifically to closely framing Jack's mug never lets you forget exactly who you are looking at. There should be plenty of available excerpt material for Oscar this year. It certainly doesn't help derail the notion of this being a vanity piece that none of the supporting characters get a chance to shine.

Not that Jack can't be remarkably and convincingly low-key. His roles in both of Sean Penn's directorial projects, The Crossing Guard and The Pledge, are some of the best and most understated work he's ever done. And having enjoyed Citizen Ruth and Election, it's surprising to find that writer/director Alexander Payne's latest attempt at satire falls short of impressing when it stars someone that is capable of delivering. Maybe a comparison of the type of respect Penn must demand versus a relative newcomer to Hollywood is in order.

Continue reading: About Schmidt Review

Kansas City Review


Weak
Every time Robert Altman makes a movie, it becomes the thing to do for the Hollywood acting community. It happened with The Player. It happened with Short Cuts. It happened with Ready to Wear. And it happened with Kansas City.

The only problem is that The Player was the last of his films that was really all that great. While Kansas City marks a slight improvement over Ready to Wear, that ain't saying much because, after all, so does Showgirls.

Continue reading: Kansas City Review

Lovely & Amazing Review


Extraordinary
Lovely & Amazing, Nicole Holofcener's follow-up to her feature debut Walking And Talking, doesn't quite rank with suburban classics like Ordinary People and American Beauty -- it never takes itself quite seriously enough for that; but it has the right makings for a memorable movie experience. Simple, sweet, and direct, this sensational portrait of engaging characters ranks as one of the year's best movies to date.

The film observes the daily rituals of four hapless but elastic women as they struggle with various demands of their eventful lives. While most movies would become lost in the complicated world of these spontaneous situations, Lovely & Amazing simply observes as the characters deal with thought-provoking issues involving relationships, health, age, romance, and work.

Continue reading: Lovely & Amazing Review

Where The Money Is Review


Good
At more than one point in his career, Paul Newman has been the ultimate con man. The Sting, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Cool Hand Luke, The Hustler, and The Color of Money all epitomized this master of smooth talk and wily ways. But the successes of all of his past films and all of their cons have one common denominator: a memorable and talented supporting cast. In The Hustler, Jackie Gleason played Minnesota Fats, who proved to be a worthy nemesis by outsmarting the cocky and more talented Newman. Tom Cruise, in The Color of Money, was like an apprentice learning from the master sorcerer, as Newman molded Cruise into an effigy of his old self. While Newman always emerged the star, he would continually share the spotlight, so that none of those movies became one-dimensional.

Newman's latest film, Where the Money Is, directed by Marek Kanievska (Less Than Zero), unfortunately lacks the supporting cast for Newman to thrive as the luminary "hustler." In the film, Newman plays Henry Manning, a former bank robber who plans to break out of prison by faking a stroke. When he is transferred to a minimum-security nursing home, he thinks he's home free. However, the woman assigned to take care of him, Carol Ann McKay (Linda Fiorentino - Men in Black) suspects that he's a fake and attempts to lure him out of his trance so he will help her in a burglary with her and her husband Wayne (Dermot Mulroney - Copycat, My Best Friend's Wedding). She goes to some outrageous lengths to keep him from playing possum, but when she finally awakes the bank robbing legend, she faces a challenge that could change her life.

Continue reading: Where The Money Is Review

Undertow Review


OK
However you may feel about David Gordon Green's movies, his strong suit is his ability to create powerful moments from the simplest daily activities. His characters feel like whole people, whether you're aware of their entire personal history or not. And the settings in which his films take place play an intricate role in the overall story without getting tedious or feeding into stereotypes.

The same could be said for Undertow, a richly filmed human drama of two boys being raised by single father John (Dermot Mulroney). Chris (Jamie Bell), being the stronger teen, is forced to do much of the labor around their small rural farm while little brother Tim (Devon Alan) eats poorly due to stomach problems. John's brother Deel (Josh Lucas) comes to stay after being released from prison to exact revenge for losing his woman and his inheritance to John, and Chris must forget his illusions of leaving familial obligations to ensure his and Tim's survival.

Continue reading: Undertow Review

Young Guns Review


Bad
Remember the Alamo, and remember the '80s. Young Guns supposedly takes place in the old west, but it actually takes place in front of the cameras. If you use your imagination, behind the impeccably coiffed brat pack (Emilio Estevez, Kiefer Sutherland, Lou Diamond Philips, Charlie Sheen), you can almost see their hairdressers, lint removers, personal assistants, entourages, and playmates. Young Guns doesn't have a good reason to exist besides an excuse for these hot young Turks to look good onscreen, pop off their guns, then mosey off the set and indulge in stardom. It might seem unfair to judge the movie this way, but damn if that isn't the way it feels -- an excuse for preening.

Fifteen years later (as the film is reissued on an indulgent Special Edition DVD set, complete with commentary track from three of the less-busy stars), everything in Young Guns feels wrong. The cheap sawdust sets, the dust-free costumes (except for tobacco chompin' Dermot Mulroney, who is "Pigpen" to the rest of the Peanuts Gang cast), the barely awake performances by Yoda-like mentor Terence Stamp and bad guy Jack Palance, and the flat-out arrogance of some of the cast members. At the time, they may have been the masters of the universe -- emblematic success stories of the Reagan era. Now, Emilio Estevez's Billy the Kid is a cute nihilist, a maniac winking at the camera to let us know deep down, he's really svelte Emilio.

Continue reading: Young Guns Review

Trixie Review


OK
It's a damn shame when a bad movie happens to a great actor. It's even worse when you try to enjoy their performance in the film while being distracted by a terrible wasteland of a script. Such is the sad case of Alan Rudolph's latest "screwball noir" farce, Trixie, a misguided attempt at expanding the noir genre by giving it a comedic twist.

Everything seemed to be in place to make a good film out of Trixie, starting with a great cast of Nick Nolte, Will Patton, Dermot Mulrooney, newcomer Brittany Murphy, Nathan Lane, and the wonderfully versatile actress Emily Watson. The story follows a misunderstood girl named Trixie, who has an annoying habit of mixing up her metaphors - with such memorable lines as "life is no bed of gravy" and "it's like looking through a needle for a haystack." Trixie holds dead-end jobs as a security guard for low-rent department stores but yearns for something better in her life. Don't we all. Eventually she takes a job at a casino resort as an undercover cop and gets involved in a tangled mess of a political sex scandal/murder mystery. Don't you just hate when that happens?!

Continue reading: Trixie Review

Goodbye Lover Review


Good
Patricia Arquette plays a Sound of Music-obsessed, Martha Stewart wannabe, psychotic killer in this slightly clever but ultimately not-clever-enough comedy/film noir. While Arquette is delish, the story ultimately lacks much compelling material that isn't lifted from Double Indemnity or one of its contemporaries. Okay for a Sunday night, but hardly great filmmaking, especially from Roland Joffé, who's done better.

Must Love Dogs Review


Very Good
Hollywood overexposes young starlets, from Lindsay Lohan to Scarlett Johansson, and puts distinguished veterans on pedestals. Yet the industry has no idea how to handle an actress once she reaches her late thirties or forties. Lacking suitable offers for mainstream parts, these talented ladies either pour their fortunes into vanity projects (Salma Hayek in Frida), turn to lower-budget independent fare (Holly Hunter in Thirteen), or dabble in primetime television (The Shield lures Glenn Close, and Teri Hatcher is reborn as a Desperate housewife).

A recent trend finds older but still attractive actresses downheartedly treading water in the dating pool for the benefit of a far-fetched plot. Heather Locklear played a flighty single mom unlucky in love for Hilary Duff's The Perfect Man. Now Oscar-nominee Diane Lane is taking her turn in the barrel with improved results.

Continue reading: Must Love Dogs Review

The Safety Of Objects Review


OK
For all of Robert Altman's greatness, his lasting legacy to future filmmakers may be the wrongheaded assumption that anyone can successfully weave together sprawling, multi-character stories into a coherent thematic experience. With the exception of a scant few disciples (headed by the visionary Paul Thomas Anderson), these spiritual and technical descendents of Altman's films, too often hampered by schematic plotting and clumsy melodrama, routinely turn out to be wobbly facsimiles of Altman's operatic, multi-layered storytelling. The latest release that falls into said category is Rose Troche's The Safety of Objects, an uneven tale (based on the short stories of A.M. Homes) of intertwined suburban families dealing with grief and loss, and its failed bid for originality takes the form of an unreasonably high quirkiness quotient.

Despite an awful title that's perfectly suited for a hospital or construction site safety guide, the objects in question are not dirty syringes or rusty nails; rather, The Safety of Objects is brimming with narrative strands about people coping with life's most difficult and daunting elements (the loss of a loved one, sexual frustration, professional ennui) by focusing their quests for happiness on either their unsatisfying careers or mundane possessions such as dishwashers, guitars, and treadmills. Esther Gold (Glenn Close) fanatically dotes on her comatose songwriter son Paul (Joshua Jackson) in lieu of caring for her husband Howard (Robert Klein) and rebellious daughter Julie (Jessica Campbell). Neighbor Annette Jennings (Patricia Clarkson) is a single mother trying to take care of her two kids while waging a financial and personal battle with her ex-husband. Lawyer Jim Train (Dermot Mulroney) can't see the forest from the trees because of his fixation with work, and his constant absence from his wife and kids has made him unaware of son Jake's (Alex House) creepy relationship with a Barbie-esque doll that speaks to him. And in a prime example of dysfunctional overload, we even get sexually frustrated, fanatically health conscious housewife Helen Christiansen (Mary Kay Place), as well as neighborhood gardener Randy (Timothy Olyphant), who's dealing with the death of his adolescent brother.

Continue reading: The Safety Of Objects Review

Must Love Dogs Review


Weak
While watching "Must Love Dogs," a romanticcomedy about moving on from divorc=E9e depression, I was sure this wouldbe a three-star review. The leads -- Diane Lane and John Cusack -- areirresistibly charismatic but accessible, the writing is wonderfully witty,and the story has a good hook: the travails of internet dating for peoplewho are still young, but too mature and serious about love for delvinginto the meat market of bars and nightclubs.

This was going to be a three-star review because of theway writer-director Gary David Goldberg (adapting Claire Cook's popularnovel) deliberately flirted with and skirted around romantic comedy cliches,making the story familiar yet fresh:

Custom boat builder Cusack and preschool teacher Lane meetearly on (in a park with borrowed dogs they both pretended to own in theirpersonal ads) and have a string of funny -- and perhaps a little too frank-- misfire dates that retain just enough chemistry to keep them both interested.But at the same time Lane, eight months out from being dumped for a youngerwoman and egged on by a family of amusingly well-intentioned busybodies,experiences bad date montages with other men. And Cusack wallows in a littleself-inflicted depression over his own divorce by watching "DoctorZhivago" at least once a day, slumped on his couch like a pile oflaundry.

This was going to be a three-star review right up untilthe movie's final five minutes, which are so much worse than any of thegenre hallmarks "Must Love Dogs" goes out of its way to set upand knock down -- so much more sappy, saccharine, ridiculous and contrived-- that it broke the picture's charming spell.

Continue reading: Must Love Dogs Review

Lovely & Amazing Review


Weak

In the 1996 modest and little-seen relationship comedy delight "Walking and Talking," writer-director Nicole Holofcener demonstrated a preternatural knack for capturing the bonds between women with her candid and vicarious style of emotion honesty and funny, true-to-life dialogue. But her second independent film, "Lovely and Amazing," fails to find the same spark as it eavesdrops on a family of gratingly neurotic and insecure women.

Sad-eyed Brenda Blethyn, a specialist at screwed-up moms ("Little Voice," "Secrets and Lies"), is the emotionally messy matriarch, who spends most of the movie in the hospital due to complications from liposuction surgery. Doped up on painkillers and more depressed than usual (in part because her flirtations with her plastic surgeon aren't getting anywhere), she still has complaints about her daughters at the ready.

"One's really f**ked up," she tells the doctor, "and the other one isn't married."

Continue reading: Lovely & Amazing Review

Undertow Review


OK

If I were to choose the single greatest American directorial debut of the last ten years, David Gordon Green's "George Washington" would be very near the top of the list. This extraordinarily lyrical film unfolded its odd, wonderful moments with a near complete disregard for plot mechanics. Green's second film, "All the Real Girls," included many of the same disconnected moments, but they were now spattered into a story about a womanizer who falls in love for the first time.

His third film, "Undertow," continues in the same vein as his latter effort. It still has the good stuff, but now it's steeped in a rudimentary, even ludicrous, plot. It plays like nothing more than an exceedingly well-written "Friday the 13th" sequel.

"Undertow" tells the story of a Southern family: a soft-spoken father, John (Dermot Mulroney), a troublesome older boy, Chris (Jamie Bell), and a sickly younger boy, Tim (Devon Alan); their mother has long ago passed on. When John's brother Deel (Josh Lucas) turns up on their doorstep, fresh from prison, John invites him to stay. It turns out that the menacing Deel is really after a case of gold coins that their father once collected. He stops at nothing to get them, not even killing his own brother and stalking the two boys across hill and dale.

Continue reading: Undertow Review

Goodbye Lover Review


Good

A darkly comic, manifold double-cross, murder-for-insurance-moneymovie, "Goodbye Lover" invokes film noir by way of Hitchcockand Tarantino as it follows a cast of sexpot ne'er-do-wells through a plotof increasingly familiar twists.

Patricia Arquette stars as Sandra Dunmore, an oddball,fashion victim, femme fatale in a blonde pageboy 'do, who seduces her brother-in-lawwhile plotting her husband's murder -- or so it seems at first.

Said brothers -- Dermot Mulroney (husband, misanthropicdrunk) and Don Johnson (cocky Casanova) -- are both insured for millionsby the upscale public relations firm at which they are executives, and,under the enticement of Sandra, have each developed nefarious designs onthe other.

Continue reading: Goodbye Lover Review

Trixie Review


Weak

Undeniably an ardently independent filmmaker with unique and eccentric vision, Alan Rudolph has made some peculiarly fascinating movies.

"Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle" radiated with atmospheric, addled Algonquin Roundtable intellectualism. "Afterglow" made the threadbare theme of marital infidelity almost hypnotically riveting.

Even when he goes down in flames, like he did with last year's "Breakfast of Champions" adaptation, he does it so spectacularly that it's almost impossible to look away.

Continue reading: Trixie Review

Where The Money Is Review


OK

Even in his 70s, strapped into a wheelchair and (supposedly) paralyzed by a stroke, Paul Newman is magnetic.

In the caper comedy "Where the Money Is" he plays an aged bank robber who has spent the better part of his life in the can. His first hint of freedom in eons has come when he's transferred to a nursing home after suffering a seizure that has left him a near vegetable.

Or has it? Even motionless and contorted there's still that glint in his eye -- which doesn't go unnoticed by one caretaker, played by Linda Fiorentino.

Continue reading: Where The Money Is Review

About Schmidt Review


Very Good

Attention anyone who has ever complained about the lack of movies for adults and about adults: Now is your chance to prove to the studio suits a great film about growing old is economically viable.

"About Schmidt" is an unaffected, quietly ingenious, wonderfully melodious, melancholy comedy starring Jack Nicholson in what may be the most tactile, nuanced and natural performance of his exalted career. He plays Warren Schmidt, a former insurance actuary from Omaha, Neb., whose life has become untethered in the double-whammy wake of recent retirement and sudden widowhood.

Trying to cope with a glut of old emotional baggage, Schmidt sets out on a soul-searching trip -- the eventual destination of which his daughter's unfortunate wedding to a mullet-headed waterbed salesman -- in the monstrous, 35-foot deluxe motor home he'd reluctantly purchased at his loving late wife's behest.

Continue reading: About Schmidt Review

Dermot Mulroney

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Dermot Mulroney

Date of birth

31st October, 1963

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.77


Dermot Mulroney Movies

The Mountain Between Us Trailer

The Mountain Between Us Trailer

When two people from different walks of life find themselves unable to take their scheduled...

Sleepless Movie Review

Sleepless Movie Review

In remaking the 2011 French thriller Sleepless Night, the filmmakers have dumbed down both the...

Sleepless Trailer

Sleepless Trailer

Vincent Downs and Derrick Griffin are two police detectives who don't play by the rules....

Careful What You Wish For Trailer

Careful What You Wish For Trailer

As they do every summer, the Martin family relocate to their summer home over the...

Dirty Grandpa Movie Review

Dirty Grandpa Movie Review

There's nothing clever about this deliberately rude and vulgar comedy, but certain audiences will find...

Dirty Grandpa Trailer

Dirty Grandpa Trailer

Dick Kelly has never been able to unwind, he's a retired army general and even...

The D Train Movie Review

The D Train Movie Review

A provocative drama wrapped in the skin of an adult sex comedy, this sharply written...

Insidious: Chapter 3 Movie Review

Insidious: Chapter 3 Movie Review

Instead of wrapping up a trilogy, writer-turned-director Leigh Whannell launches a new horror franchise with...

Insidious: Chapter 3 Trailer

Insidious: Chapter 3 Trailer

A year and a half ago, a young girl lost her mother. She misses her...

August: Osage County Movie Review

August: Osage County Movie Review

Tracy Letts adapts his own prize-winning play into a blistering depiction of one of cinema's...

August: Osage County Trailer

August: Osage County Trailer

The Weston family know they are probably one of the most dysfunctional families around, but...

Jobs Trailer

Jobs Trailer

Steve Jobs founded Apple Inc. with his techie pal Steve Wozniak after leaving Reed College...

Stoker Movie Review

Stoker Movie Review

You could argue that this film is all lurid style over substance, but there's actually...

Jobs Trailer

Jobs Trailer

Steve Jobs is the late founder of Apple Inc. and who was a technological pioneer...

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