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Dennis Quaid Will Play George W. Bush In 'Katrina: American Crime Story'


Dennis Quaid

Last year, 'The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story' entertained audiences across the globe, bringing an incredible roster of actors to the small screen for the first season of a new anthology series from executive producer Ryan Murphy. Adapting the real-life infamous O. J. Simpson murder trial and based on the 1997 book 'The Run of His Life: The People v. O. J. Simpson' by Jeffrey Toobin, the season won nine Emmy Awards and a pair of Golden Globes. It's fair to say it was a huge success.

Ryan Murphy has added Dennis Quaid to his 'Katrina' castRyan Murphy has added Dennis Quaid to his 'Katrina' cast

With all of that in mind, Murphy has been taking his time in bringing the show's second season to viewers, with the series not set to air at any point this year, instead with two seasons hitting the small screen in 2018. The first of those will be 'Katrina: American Crime Story' with Cuba Gooding Jr. and Sarah Paulson amongst the returning cast. This week however, a new face has been added to the 'Katrina' cast members.

Continue reading: Dennis Quaid Will Play George W. Bush In 'Katrina: American Crime Story'

'A Dog's Purpose' Producer Blasts The AHA And PETA In 'Abuse' Statement


Dennis Quaid

Last week, a video surfaced from the set of Lasse Hallstrom's latest movie 'A Dog's Purpose' seemingly showing a dog being forced into running water against its will and subsequently going under. Some members of the cast and crew who were not present during the incident expressed anger over the clip, but producer Gavin Polone has unveiled an article explaining exactly what happened.

Dennis Quaid stars in 'A Dog's Purpose'Dennis Quaid stars in 'A Dog's Purpose'

After the clip appeared on TMZ, PETA called for a boycott of the movie. A statement from Amblin Productions saw them insist that the German Shepherd in question, named Hercules, was not harmed in the stunt and suffered no lasting trauma. However, star Josh Gad, director Lasse Hallstrom and producer Gavin Polone all commented that they were disturbed by what they saw, regardless of the story behind it.

Continue reading: 'A Dog's Purpose' Producer Blasts The AHA And PETA In 'Abuse' Statement

'A Dog's Purpose' Under Fire Over Alleged Animal Cruelty On Set


Lasse Hallstrom Josh Gad Dennis Quaid

Animal lovers and PETA have reacted with anger after a dog was seen apparently being forced into a stream of running water on the set of Dennis Quaid's new film 'A Dog's Purpose'. Producers from the movie have since denied that the animal was forced to do anything during filming.

Lasse HallstromLasse Hallstrom 'disturbed' by video from the filming of his movie 'A Dog's Purpose'

In the forthcoming comedy drama 'A Dog's Purpose', one canine soul explores his various existences as different breeds of dogs with different owners and a range of purposes. Based on the 2010 novel of the same name by W. Bruce Cameron, it has been directed by Oscar nominated Swedish filmmaker Lasse Hallström.

Continue reading: 'A Dog's Purpose' Under Fire Over Alleged Animal Cruelty On Set

Dennis Quaid - Dennis Quaid arrives at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 12th May 2016

Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid

Bryan Cranston, Eric Berger, Kate Bosworth , Dennis Quaid - Crackle Upfront Presentation 2016 - Red Carpet Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Wednesday 20th April 2016

Bryan Cranston, Eric Berger, Kate Bosworth and Dennis Quaid
Eric Berger, Christian Cooke, Kate Bosworth and Bryan Cranston
Andy Kaplan, Bryan Cranston and Eric Berger
Bryan Cranston
Bryan Cranston
Bryan Cranston

Truth Review

Excellent

That generic title obscures a surprisingly complex exploration of the real-life events surrounding the fall of iconic American newscaster Dan Rather in 2004. And while the film's script is rather talky (it's like Aaron Sorkin's The Newsroom crossed with George Clooney's Good Night and Good Luck), it's strongly made point is too important to ignore. And it features yet another storming, intelligent performance from Cate Blanchett.

She plays Mary Mapes, a producer at the classic CBS news programme 60 Minutes, who just a few months before the 2004 presidential election is working on a story about incumbent George W. Bush's shady National Guard service during the Vietnam War. She has an ace team of investigators (including Topher Grace, Dennis Quaid and Elisabeth Moss), plus the nation's top news anchor Rather (Robert Redford). But after the story airs, Mary is attacked with questions about the authenticity of a series of memos that trace irregularities in Bush's service record. Her boss (Bruce Greenwood) applies plenty of pressure as the controversy gains more traction than the story itself. And the media storm that follows catches everyone by surprise.

This account is based on Mapes' own memoir about these events, which gives the film a personal, as opposed to journalistic, tone. It hints heavily at both government and corporate efforts to discredit the story, putting Mapes and her entire team in an impossible situation. The film also makes it clear that those memos were indeed real, and that the controversy was actually just misdirection. What brings this to life is the revelatory acting from the ensemble cast, led beautifully by Blanchett, who gives Mary a passion for the truth that's fuelled by her inner demons. And the entire supporting cast adds layers of wit and insight, although Redford kind of relaxes on his easy charm as the engaged, engaging Rather.

Continue reading: Truth Review

Dennis Quaid - Dennis Quaid arrives on a flight to Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 17th December 2015

Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid

Dennis Quaid , Kate Bosworth - Los Angeles premiere of 'The Art of More,' a Crackle original series at William Holden Theatre At Sony Pictures Studios - Culver City, California, United States - Thursday 29th October 2015

Dennis Quaid and Kate Bosworth
Dennis Quaid and Kate Bosworth
Dennis Quaid and Kate Bosworth
Dennis Quaid and Kate Bosworth
Dennis Quaid and Kate Bosworth

Dennis Quaid - Los Angeles Premiere for Crackle's "The Art of More" at William Holden Theatre At Sony Pictures Studios - Culver City, California, United States - Thursday 29th October 2015

Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Cary Elwes, Kate Bosworth and Dennis Quaid
Cary Elwes, Kate Bosworth and Dennis Quaid

Dennis Quaid - Hamptons International Film Festival - 'Truth' - Opening Night and Premiere at Guild Hall - East Hampton, New York, United States - Thursday 8th October 2015

Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
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Dennis Quaid

Dennis Quaid - Dennis Quaid leaves the Crosby Street Hotel holding a takeout container full of bread - Manhattan, New York, United States - Thursday 8th October 2015

Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid

Dennis Quaid , Kimberly Quaid - Dennis Quaid arrives at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 9th September 2015

Dennis Quaid and Kimberly Quaid
Dennis Quaid and Kimberly Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid and Kimberly Quaid
Dennis Quaid and Kimberly Quaid
Dennis Quaid and Kimberly Quaid

Dennis Quaid - Los Angeles Police Memorial Foundation Celebrity Golf Tournament at Brookside Golf Club - Pasadena, California, United States - Saturday 20th June 2015

Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid

Dennis Quaid - Dennis Quaid arrives at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 27th February 2015

Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
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Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid

Dennis Quaid, Terri Hatcher and Oscar De La Hoya - 42nd Annual LAPD Memorial Foundation Celebrity Golf Tournament at the Brookside Golf Club - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 31st May 2014

Dennis Quaid, Terri Hatcher and Oscar De La Hoya
Dennis Quaid

Dennis Quaid and William Dorfman DDS - Celebrity judges arrive for University of California, Los Angeles' (UCLA) annual Spring Sing, which showcases their most talented students performing song, dance and sketch comedy - Westwood, California, United States - Saturday 17th May 2014

Dennis Quaid and William Dorfman Dds
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid

Dennis Quaid - Dennis Quaid leaving The Luxe Hotel in Beverly Hills sucking on a pen - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Thursday 19th September 2013

Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid

At Any Price Trailer


Henry Whipple is a highly respected farmer in the world of agriculture and thinks of little else other than expanding his three generation old farming land in Iowa. After watching his favourite son Grant fly the nest as a football star, he does his best to push his youngest son Dean into the family business, understanding that the empire will be lost if he doesn't take on the responsibility. However, Dean has other things on his mind; he wants to be a professional car racer and is already a champion on his local circuit. He is determined to prove his sceptical father wrong by reaching the racing heights of ARCA and NASCAR. Henry, meanwhile, faces big business troubles when his farm is investigated by GMO corn company Liberty Seeds; his whole career hangs in the balance, but he must learn that if he doesn't change the way he is, it won't be the only thing he loses.

Continue: At Any Price Trailer

"New York Feels Like A Constant Film Set": Will Hurricane Sandy Inspire Movies?


Dennis Quaid Jake Gyllenhaal

Postmodern life has deigned that we receive the world through a media lens. Very little of what we encounter do we take at face value, rather everything is realised and equated with what we've seen on a screen. For those of us outside Hurricane Sandy it's difficult to understand the scale nor the emotion that must be present, but as the Sun has reported it's like "[waking] up in a disaster movie".  This is nothing new because "When you live in New York, it feels like you're constantly on a film set," as the Annette Witherage further stated.

Sandy has already been related to one disaster movie - The Day After Tomorrow which starred Jake Gyllenhaal as Dennis Quaid. A still from the film has already been exploited. The image was of the Statue of Liberty engulfed in waves; it sent its own waves of fear regarding the immense power of the storm, but it was later realised to be a hoax. The LA Times has also likened it to Life of Pi, which follows a boy stranded on a raft in the ocean when an enormous storm hits. Sandy has been touted as the disaster that tweeted, as accounts of the event is being circulated via the social networking site quicker than anywhere else. Sandy was never going to be able to keep out of the spotlight and as the disaster hits one of the most iconic cities of the world, let alone just America, the movie potential will also be something of a talking point in Hollywood. Flight 93 and United 93 are two movies that were made about the events as they transpired on 9/11, and this year has seen the release of one of the first Hurricane Katrina movies, Beasts of the Southern Wild. 

With a reported 48 people's lives claimed by Sandy, a film with even a fraction of the beauty and tenderness present in Beasts of the Southern Wild would be a beautiful tribute to the storm that has already stormed the media.

Dennis Quaid and White House Saturday 1st May 2010 2010 White House Correspondents Association Dinner held at the Washington Hilton Hotel - Arrivals Washington DC, USA

Dennis Quaid and White House

Legion Review


Good
There's nothing wrong with being preposterous, but this guilty pleasure thriller has a tendency to be pretentious as well. Despite a few winks at the camera, the emphasis on po-faced, nasty brutality wears rather thin.

The angel Michael (Bettany) has fallen from heaven, cut off his wings and armed himself to the teeth. Soon he's holed up in a remote desert diner run by Bob (Quaid) and his son Jeep (Black). Michael encourages the rag-tag group in the diner (including Gibson's shady tough guy, one-armed chef Dutton and bickering family Walsh, Tenney and Holland) to fight an invading horde of zombies, apparently sent by God to destroy humanity. And mankind's only hope is to save the unborn child of a waitress (Palicki) from the snarling angel Gabriel (Durand).

Continue reading: Legion Review

Battle For Terra Review


Very Good
Made two years before the similarly themed Avatar, this original, vividly designed sci-fi animation makes an astute commentary on current issues. And this depth of feeling more than makes up for the relatively slack pace and thin characters.

When a giant ship of humans arrives at an isolated planet, they don't really understand that the residents are living in peace with nature and others. So they launch an all-out attack on the world they have named Terra. But a feisty local named Mala (Wood) stands up to them, teaming up with crash-landed earthling Stanton (Wilson) and his robot sidekick (Cross). And earth's General Hemmer (Cox) is more than happy to indulge in annihilation top get his hands on this planet.

Continue reading: Battle For Terra Review

Legion Trailer


Watch the trailer for Legion

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Pandorum Review


Bad
An appalling script is only one problem with this loud, chaotic sci-fi thriller. It's also directed in such a deliberately confusing way that it's not only impossible to follow the action, but it's impossible to care about the characters.

In the spidery space vessel Elysium, which left Earth in 2174, Bower (Foster) awakens from hiber-sleep with no memory of who he is. The ship's in trouble, and when Lt Payton (Quaid) wakes up, he doesn't remember anything either. So Bower heads into the darkened ship to try to reboot the power supply. But he soon encounters viciously murderous creatures, as well as a few lost and desperate crewmen (Traue and Le). Meanwhile, Payton finds the mercurial Gallo (Gigandet), who seems to know more than admits.

Continue reading: Pandorum Review

Pandorum Trailer


Watch the trailer for Pandorum

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G.I. Joe: The Rise Of Cobra Review


Excellent
Frankly, this is what summer movies should be like. The filmmakers have harvested the coolest elements from blockbusters over the past five or six years and thrown them all into one wildly entertaining, thoroughly over-the-top action thriller.

US soldiers Duke and Ripcord (Tatum and Wayans) are guarding a terrifying new nano-weapon when they're attacked and then defended by two outrageously high-tech assault forces. They of course eventually join the good side, the G.I. Joes, an elite team led by General Hawk (Quaid). These top commandos (including Nichols, Taghmaoui, Akinnuoye-Agbaje and Park) are hunting Duke's ex Ana (Miller), who has gone over to the dark side to help supervillain arms dealer McCullen (Eccleston) and his Vader-esque evil-doctor sidekick with their nefarious plan for world domination.

Continue reading: G.I. Joe: The Rise Of Cobra Review

The Express Review


Good
Ernie Davis made the most of his too-brief life.

Football came naturally to the Pennsylvania native, and it was on the gridiron where he cemented his identity. A gifted running back, Davis was recruited by the great Jim Brown to play for coach Ben Schwartzwalder at Syracuse University. While an Orangeman, Davis earned MVP honors at the Cotton Bowl in 1960 and the Liberty Bowl in '61. Later that year, Davis became the first African-American to win the Heisman Trophy. The Washington Redskins used their first pick in the 1962 draft on Davis (though the team immediately traded him to the Cleveland Browns). But in 1963, before playing a single down in the National Football League, Davis died of leukemia at the age of 23.

Continue reading: The Express Review

Smart People Review


OK
In acting, chameleon-like versatility can be overrated. In Smart People, the principle actors are assigned roles right in their natural strike zones, and it's a pleasure to watch them swing away with ease. Dennis Quaid capitalizes on his natural late-career crankiness to play Lawrence Wetherhold, a widowed English professor with a perpetual sour look. His daughter Vanessa is a mouthy overachiever, which is the established domain of Ellen Page, whether her gift is configured through superhuman quippiness (Juno), insane manipulation (Hard Candy), or the ability to walk through walls (X-Men: The Last Stand).

Entering into the Wetherhold house, ostensibly to chauffer the belligerent prof after a seizure suspends his driver's license, is Lawrence's laid-back, semi-transient adopted brother Chuck. Chuck is played by Thomas Haden Church in a clear and mostly successful post-Sideways bid to establish future laid-back semi-transients as "the Thomas Haden Church part." Church and Page are especially fun to watch and, especially, listen to: Church's sort of deadpan surfer growl and Page's nasal precociousness in a vocal duel. That they recall their previous roles only hastens our desire to spend time with them.

Continue reading: Smart People Review

Dennis Quaid Thursday 27th March 2008 Dennis Quaid thanked medical healthcare journalists for their articles that helped him when his newborn twins almost died from a hospital error giving them 1000 times the prescribed concentration of the blood thinner Heparin Crystal City, Virginia

Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid
Dennis Quaid

Vantage Point Review


OK
When you hear that a film has been sitting on the shelf for a couple of years (since 2006, apparently), certain reactionary red flags go off in your head. Of course, the makers of the new political thriller, Vantage Point, could argue that it was the subject matter, not sloppy filmmaking or underdeveloped characters, that required some temporal displacement. After all, the narrative revolves around the attempted assassination of the U.S. President at an anti-terrorism summit in Spain. The argued novelty of writer Barry Levy's script and director Pete Travis' approach is the Rashomon-styled multiple perspective of the participants. We view this event from every possible point of view except a logical -- or entertaining -- one.

During a high powered public meeting between the United States and several Arab nations, President Ashton (William Hurt) is seemingly felled by an assassin's bullet. Seconds later, a bomb goes off in the square. While Secret Service agents Thomas Barnes (Dennis Quaid) and Kent Taylor (Matthew Fox) try to piece together the clues, camera-toting bystander Howard Lewis (Forest Whitaker) believes he captured the entire event, including the shooter, on tape. Similarly, a local police detective (Eduardo Noreiga) assigned to the mayor believes he knows who did it as well. There are ties to a local insurgency and Middle Eastern influences. But that's just the superficial version of what happened. Once everyone's vantage point is explored, the truth becomes warped and quite deadly.

Continue reading: Vantage Point Review

Yours, Mine And Ours (2005) Review


Bad
Three major studios (Sony, Paramount, and MGM) collaborated on one motion picture, and this is the result? A moronic mingling of massive families, Brady Bunch style, that isn't satisfied until father figure Dennis Quaid is coated in a sticky paste and pummeled into submission? That thinks it's amusing when one child pukes, but hilarious when another child slips in it? That somehow convinces Oscar winner Linda Hunt to attempt a demoralizing joke involving her pink thong? I've long since accepted that Hollywood requires its family comedies to be juvenile, but do they need to be so dumb?

Raja Gosnell's Yours, Mine and Ours is a remake of a mediocre Lucille Ball-Henry Fonda pairing that couldn't be further from the original. This version reunites former sweethearts Frank Beardsley (Quaid) and Helen North (Rene Russo), except now they're widows heading up huge families - he has eight children, she has 10. While attending their high school reunion, the two are pleasantly surprised to find that the feelings they once shared still exist. In the very next scene - which we have to assume occurs the day after the reunion - Frank and Helen are telling their respective broods that they tied the knot, forming one gigantic disaster of a family.

Continue reading: Yours, Mine And Ours (2005) Review

American Dreamz Review


Weak
There's a peculiarly painful sensation one gets when witnessing a comedy build toward its big moment, having carefully laid all out all the correct elements and primed you for all the gags as it leads up to the orchestrated finale and then... Just. Doesn't. Get. There. You get that feeling quite a lot in Paul Weitz's American Dreamz, about an American Idol-like reality show which becomes the linchpin in a dangerously rickety skit about wannabe celebrities, and yes, the war on terror (because one must be relevant). There's another feeling one gets, and it comes from that oft-ignored voice in the back of your head, the one that says, Hey, maybe we shouldn't be laughing at this, even if it was funny.What are we supposed to make of this queasy and uncertain concoction that lands a few weak punches and then dances safely back out of range? Weitz is no Wilder, but he's done better than most in comedy. American Pie may have brought us an unfortunate amount of Chris Klein, and In Good Company was hardly a beacon of originality, but they both possessed a refreshing amount of heart; while About a Boy proved that Hugh Grant's louche side is his best one. These were all films of modest means that succeeded beyond their stated intent. With American Dreamz, writer/director Weitz not only bites off more than he can chew, he (not to mention we) can barely get his mouth around the thing.The constellation of players include: Britney-like Ohioan pop striver Sally Kendoo (Mandy Moore), Simon Cowell-esque host Martin Tweed (Hugh Grant), a president and vice-president (Dennis Quaid and Willem Dafoe) who just may resemble a pair currently in power over there in D.C., and Omer (Sam Golzari), a clumsy, showtunes-loving terrorist (you read that right) who accidentally gets on the show after being sent to join a sleeper cell in Orange County. There's also Sally's sweet but dumb-as-rocks boyfriend William Williams (Chris Klein), who runs off to the army after she dumps him, and Omer's flaming-gay cousin Iqbal (Tony Yalda) who thinks he deserves to be on the show, and a number of fine performers like Shohreh Aghdashloo, Judy Greer, and John Cho wasted in dead-end roles. With all this at hand, Weiss aims to plug into some sort of vein of current American irreality, juxtaposing the fanatic public adulation of this TV show with the grinding presence of the war and the terrorist threat, but ends up splashing them all with the same cartoonish colors and scoring only the easiest of points.There is ample opportunity here, it's just not utilized. Quaid plays his Bush stand-in with ardent vigor as a decent but none-too-bright man who wakes up the day after his reelection and announces to his stunned manservant, "I'm going to read the newspaper." Cut to weeks later and the president bedroom is thick with papers and books, the commander in chief's head dangerously expanding, saying incredulously to his Cheney-like VP (Dafoe, mixing just the right amount of malice and buffoonery), "Did you know there were three different kinds of Iraqistanis?" But then this line of broad mockery is abandoned for a "Terrorist Training Camp" in some California desert masquerading as the generic Middle East, where Omer - who became a terrorist because his mom was killed by an American bomb; funny, that - dances to showtunes in his tent. Then it switches again to Ohio for some dreadfully unfunny reality-show-contestant satire that flops dead on arrival due to Moore's dead fish of a performance. Like Grant - who should have turned in a killer Cowell impression here, and whose soulless character bonds with Moore - she remains on the leash, never fully engaging. About the only thing in the too widely ranging American Dreamz that works is Omer, a sweetheart of a character whose earnest lack of talent is as endearing in the film as it would be on a reality show - for a satire aimed at modern society, he's about the only character who could actually exist in it.It has been said by some that Paul Greengrass's United 93 - prior to its opening, at least - is an exploitation of a national tragedy, a shameless attempt to make dramaturgical hay from an episode that should be treated with more respect. The jury of public opinion has yet, of course, to make a ruling in that matter. Until then, though, we have American Dreamz, which seems to think that the Iraq War, terrorism, the death of innocent Middle Easterners by American hands, and the current White House situation are all just as equally worthy targets of spoofery and fun as is reality TV. It's not really a cynical or outrageous point of view, but just a really lazy one, and offensively, exploitatively so.Who likes pizza?

Breaking Away Review


Good
27 years after its release, my memory had managed to turn Breaking Away into "a movie about cycling," all its other details lost to time. Upon rewatching it, I realize now why that happened: Breaking Away isn't about much at all. It's a small, almost silly little movie that takes the setup of The Outsiders -- rich kids vs. working class -- and throws in some bikes. Despite a reasonably fun performance from Daniel Stern, Dennis Quaid earnest overacting sinks what could have been a quaint film about middle America.

Yours, Mine And Ours Review


Bad
Three major studios (Sony, Paramount, and MGM) collaborated on one motion picture, and this is the result? A moronic mingling of massive families, Brady Bunch style, that isn't satisfied until father figure Dennis Quaid is coated in a sticky paste and pummeled into submission? That thinks it's amusing when one child pukes, but hilarious when another child slips in it? That somehow convinces Oscar winner Linda Hunt to attempt a demoralizing joke involving her pink thong? I've long since accepted that Hollywood requires its family comedies to be juvenile, but do they need to be so dumb?

Raja Gosnell's Yours, Mine and Ours is a remake of a mediocre Lucille Ball-Henry Fonda pairing that couldn't be further from the original. This version reunites former sweethearts Frank Beardsley (Quaid) and Helen North (Rene Russo), except now they're widows heading up huge families - he has eight children, she has 10. While attending their high school reunion, the two are pleasantly surprised to find that the feelings they once shared still exist. In the very next scene - which we have to assume occurs the day after the reunion - Frank and Helen are telling their respective broods that they tied the knot, forming one gigantic disaster of a family.

Continue reading: Yours, Mine And Ours Review

Frequency Review


Extraordinary
The time travel/time bending genre always seems worn out. The very topic lends itself to the production of hacky movies like Millennium, and yet I am constantly surprised to see one film after another making good on the hidden promise of the genre. Witness the Back to the Future series and the powerful 12 Monkeys. As it turns out, mucking with time actually pays off more often than not!

Not only is Frequency a good flick, it's fully worthy of a place among one of the best timetwisters ever made.

Continue reading: Frequency Review

The Parent Trap (1998) Review


Good
Quaint remake of the original Trap, featuring the oh-so-cute Lohan as separated twins trying to reunite their parents. Amazing work for a kid her age, I must admit. Way too long, though.

Dinner With Friends Review


Good
Ten minutes with Toni Collette's Beth and you'll understand why her husband (Greg Kinnear) wants to be rid of her. As an adult drama, Dinner With Friends is apt enough at exploring late-thirtysomething angst and crisis, well acting and paced with enough momentum to keep the story from dragging. Too bad the emotion is all on the surface, making it difficult to identify with any of the characters in a positive way.

Traffic Review


Essential
How do you fight a war when the people that you love are the enemy? When the conflict is in your own neighborhood, or your own house? Such is the dilemma in the exceptional new film about the drug trade in the United States and Mexico, Traffic.

A harrowing and thought-provoking film, Traffic revolves around three intertwining stories of cops, thugs, victims, enforcers, politicians, and the judicial system. The film is based on a British Channel 4 miniseries called Traffik, which traced a drug route from Pakistan through Europe and to Great Britain. Laura Bickford, one of the producers for Traffic, was attracted to the original miniseries because of the intersecting stories, the social commentary on drug usage, and the implication of The System itself being the major perpetrator of drug addiction.

Continue reading: Traffic Review

Any Given Sunday Review


Very Good
Football is as engrained in our society's mores as deeply as war, family values, and politics -- at least that's what Oliver Stone would like you to believe. To back up this statement, Any Given Sunday analyzes the effects of a culture that elevates professional athletes and coaches to a plateau where they are immortalized as heroes of the common man. Stone's football fairytale is a culmination of every anecdote, highlight, or soundbite you've ever seen associated with the pigskin, wrapped up in an aesthetically pleasing Christmas package, and sealed with a kiss from team owner Cameron Diaz. Stone aims to please, and he doesn't miss a single cliché of the revered and scrutinized American athlete.

At its core, Any Given Sunday is the story of Miami Sharks coach Tony D'Amato (Al Pacino - The Godfather, Dog Day Afternoon) and his two quarterbacks, Willie Beamen (Jamie Foxx - The Great White Hype, Booty Call) and Cap Rooney (Dennis Quaid - The Big Easy, Innerspace). The quarterback is the most vital position in the game. He is the team spokesperson and field chief, and he serves as a crucial link between coaches, administration, and players. When legendary two-time Pantheon Cup (aka: Super Bowl) champion Cap Bowman ruptures a disk after a bone crushing hit, coach Tony is left with Willie Beamen (Foxx), an athletic, yet untested QB. His team has lost four straight and appears to be plummeting in a downward spiral with the playoffs right around the corner. He's got delusional team owner Christina Pagniacci (Cameron Diaz) and sports analyst Jack Rose (John McGinley, doing his best Jim Rome impersonation) breathing down his neck because of his outdated coaching style, and a team of players he's losing control of.

Continue reading: Any Given Sunday Review

In Good Company Review


OK
It's one of those nightmare scenarios of which feel-good stories are made: Dan Foreman (Dennis Quaid), middle-aged family man and top sales guy at a big, Sports Illustrated-like magazine, gets thrown for a loop when his company is bought and he gets demoted to make room for Carter Duryea (Topher Grace), some whiz kid half his age. Oh, and his daughter wants to transfer from SUNY to the much more expensive NYU. Oh, and that night when he gets home, his wife tells him she's pregnant. At first it seems that In Good Company is not going to go for the feel-good resolution in which lessons are learned, lives are improved, and everybody fades into a happy sunset... but then it does, and it's hard not to feel cheated.

Whatever else may be said, this film is the work of consummate professionals, and that doesn't mean it's soulless but competent hackwork. Writer/director Paul Weitz showed with his wonderful, glowing adaptation of Nick Hornby's About a Boy that he could tell heartwarming stories that didn't insult the mind and could inject just enough acidity into a romance to keep a movie from flopping into a messy, Love, Actually-style mess. The directing and writing here are superbly crisp, and one really couldn't ask for better performances, both from the stars and supporting cast.

Continue reading: In Good Company Review

The Right Stuff Review


Extraordinary
Fortuitous time for The Right Stuff to hit DVD, when the American space program is nearing rock bottom in the court of public opinion.

Based on Tom Wolfe's novel (though heavily inspired by the truth), The Right Stuff follows the formative years of the space race, from 1947 to 1963, when it was us vs. the Russians. The film begins as we first punch through Mach 1 in experimental aircraft and ends with seventh and final Mercury astronaut blasting off.

Continue reading: The Right Stuff Review

The Alamo Review


OK

If you want to remember the Alamo, the latest feature film version of the Texas fort's famous last stand may not be much help.

A beautifully produced but relatively bloodless (literally and figuratively) Hollywood rendering of the 1836 siege on San Antonio by tyrannical General Santa Anna, who was determined to recapture the territory for Mexico, it's a movie more concerned with details like Jim Bowie's terminal case of consumption than it is with the historical context of its story and its legendary characters.

In this movie, Bowie (Jason Patric) the frontier adventurer and volunteer army colonel is presented as little more than an infamous "knife fighter" haunted by his wife's death. Newspaper publisher, lawyer and militiaman Lt. Col. William B. Travis (Patrick Wilson) is just a determined dandy with questioned military skills (questioned mostly by Bowie) who rises to the occasion as temporary commander of these now-fortified grounds surrounding an unfinished mission. David "Davey" Crockett (Billy Bob Thornton) is a fiddle-playing former senator made famous by a stage play written about something he once did while wearing a coonskin hat -- and why he's even at the Alamo isn't entirely clear.

Continue reading: The Alamo Review

Any Given Sunday Review


Good

There's only about 22 minutes of plot in "Any Given Sunday," Oliver Stone's innovative, bone-crunching ballet of sound and fury football, so lets get that out of the way right now:

Al Pacino stars as the embattled, old-school coach of a fictitious pro football team. Cameron Diaz, is the willful, profit-zealous daughter of the franchise's recently deceased owner. Jamie Foxx is a hotshot young quarterback whose know-it-all attitude and colossal ego threaten team unity. He's just replaced the injured, aging, Elway-esque veteran QB Dennis Quaid, whose compound back injury has spelled curtains for his career -- if only his ruthlessly ambitious, harpy of a wife (Lauren Holly) would accept that fact.

During the last two minutes of the fourth quarter of the Big Playoff Game that serves as the film's climax, each of these characters (especially the selfish ones) will have an epiphany about what's really important in their lives.

Continue reading: Any Given Sunday Review

Traffic Review


Weak

"Traffic" is a socially and politically grandstanding soap opera about the narcotics trade and the futility of the "war on drugs." It's a film about how that war is propagated by bureaucratic demagogues in the United States government, not because they think they can stem the flow of illegal substances but because they think saying they want to is a way to win elections.

OK. Point taken.

"Traffic" is also gritty and realistic feat of cinematic logistics, following no less than 15 major characters (and more than 50 speaking parts) through several complex, well-acted storylines about all sides of the drug trade -- from kingpins to cops to policy wonks to addicts. So my hat is off to the picture's ever-brilliant director, Steven Soderbergh ("Erin Brockovich"), who certainly does a fine juggling act, involving the audience in every story on a personal level.

Continue reading: Traffic Review

The Day After Tomorrow Review


OK

"The Day After Tomorrow" isn't quite the disaster of a disaster flick I thought it would be.

Don't get me wrong -- it's bad in a way only $150-million movies with awe-inspiring special effects can be bad. It's riddled with nonsensical pseudo-science, saddled with supposedly brainy characters (climatologists, high-school science whizzes) who nonetheless haven't a scrap of common sense, and stuffed with stock characters designed for the kind of instant sympathy (or instant comic relief) that doesn't require actually giving them a personality.

But for popcorn munching and smart-remarking during a bargain matinee, it's a bad movie worth the price of admission.

Continue reading: The Day After Tomorrow Review

Dennis Quaid

Dennis Quaid Quick Links

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Dennis Quaid

Date of birth

9th April, 1954

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.83


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Dennis Quaid Movies

A Dog's Purpose Trailer

A Dog's Purpose Trailer

If you're lucky enough to have a dog in your life, you'll know that you...

Truth Movie Review

Truth Movie Review

That generic title obscures a surprisingly complex exploration of the real-life events surrounding the fall...

Truth Trailer

Truth Trailer

Mary Mapes is the producer of CBS' '60 Minutes' and, in the run up to...

The Words Movie Review

The Words Movie Review

Like a Russian nesting doll, this film tells a story within a story within another...

At Any Price Trailer

At Any Price Trailer

Henry Whipple is a highly respected farmer in the world of agriculture and thinks of...

At Any Price Trailer

At Any Price Trailer

Henry Whipple is an ambitious farmer with high hopes for his promising agricultural family business....

The Words Trailer

The Words Trailer

Rory Jansen is a young writer who is failing to achieve any kind of literary...

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What to Expect When You're Expecting Movie Review

What to Expect When You're Expecting Movie Review

The odd moment of honest drama or genuinely witty humour catches us completely off guard,...

What To Expect When You're Expecting Trailer

What To Expect When You're Expecting Trailer

What to Expect When You're Expecting is a comic adaptation of the New York Times'...

Footloose Movie Review

Footloose Movie Review

A surprisingly faithful remake of the iconic 1984 hit, this crowd-pleasing romp finds some intriguing...

Soul Surfer Trailer

Soul Surfer Trailer

Thirteen year old Bethany Hamilton loves to surf; she comes from a family of surfers,...

Footloose Trailer

Footloose Trailer

Ren McCormack moves to Beaumont, Tennessee from Boston. He soon becomes friends with a boy...

Legion Movie Review

Legion Movie Review

There's nothing wrong with being preposterous, but this guilty pleasure thriller has a tendency to...

Battle For Terra Movie Review

Battle For Terra Movie Review

Made two years before the similarly themed Avatar, this original, vividly designed sci-fi animation makes...

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