Dennis Haysbert

Dennis Haysbert

Dennis Haysbert Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Quotes RSS

San Diego Comic-Con International 2015 - Celebrity Sightings

Dennis Haysbert - San Diego Comic-Con International 2015 - Celebrity Sightings - San Diego, California, United States - Saturday 11th July 2015

Dennis Haysbert
Dennis Haysbert
Dennis Haysbert
Dennis Haysbert
Dennis Haysbert

New York premiere of 'Ted 2'

Dennis Haysbert - New York premiere of 'Ted 2' at the Ziegfeld Theater - Red Carpet Arrivals at Ziegfeld Theater - New York City, United States - Wednesday 24th June 2015

Dennis Haysbert
Dennis Haysbert

Los Angeles Police Memorial Foundation Celebrity Golf Tournament

Dennis Haysbert and Jack Wagner - Los Angeles Police Memorial Foundation Celebrity Golf Tournament at Brookside Golf Club - Pasadena, California, United States - Saturday 20th June 2015

Neal McDonough, Ruve McDonough and Dennis Haysbert
Neal McDonough, Ruve McDonough and Dennis Haysbert
Neal McDonough, Ruve McDonough and Dennis Haysbert
Neal McDonough, Ruve McDonough and Dennis Haysbert
Neal McDonough, Ruve McDonough and Dennis Haysbert

The eighth annual George Lopez Celebrity Golf Classic

Dennis Haysbert - The eighth annual George Lopez Celebrity Golf Classic presented by Sabra - Arrivals at Lakeside Golf Club - Toluca Lake, California, United States - Monday 4th May 2015

Dennis Haysbert
Dennis Haysbert

2015 We Day - Performance

Dennis Haysbert - A variety of stars performed at the 2015 We Day held which was held at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont, Chicago, Illinois, United States - Thursday 30th April 2015

Men, Women & Children Review


Weak

There's a fundamental flaw to this multi-strand social media-themed drama: it's told completely from the perspective of older people who are fearful about the possibilities, rather than the generation for whom electronic communication is the norm. It's well-made by director Jason Reitman (age 36) and his cowriter Erin Cressida Wilson (50) from the novel by Chad Kultgen (38), but it kind of misses the point that this is the future of human interaction. So younger (or more switched-on) viewers won't buy the cautionary message.

IR's set in Austin, Texas, where Rachel and Don (Rosemarie DeWitt and Adam Sandler) are each so focussed on finding space outside their marriage that they don't notice that their teen son Chris (Travis Tope) is hanging out with self-proclaimed slutty cheerleader Hannah (Olivia Crocicchia). Her best friend Allison (Elena Kamporis) is starving herself to be like her, spurred on by her mother (Judy Greer), who is doing everything she can to make Allison a star. Meanwhile, Patricia (Jennifer Garner) is desperate to control how her daughter Brandy (Kaitkyn Dever) uses small-screens, especially worried about her growing friendship with Tim (Ansel Elgort), whose father (Dean Norris) is annoyed that he has quit the school football team.

Oddly, the film seems to adopt the adults' fears as its central tone: the internet and mobile phone communications are potentially dangerous, addictive and isolating. But this makes the film feel more like a sermon than a set of intertwined stories. A far more interesting approach would be to explore how communication and relationships are shifting due to the influence of online media. Indeed, the generational aspects to the films various plotlines are the most compelling elements, with clashing points of view between grown-ups and kids. But audience members who believe that mobile phones and social media sites are the future will struggle with the way Reitman presents them as inherently troublesome.

Continue reading: Men, Women & Children Review

Sin City: A Dame to Kill For Review


Good

It's taken nearly 10 years for filmmaker Robert Rodriguez and graphic novelist Frank Miller to get around to making this sequel, but it was worth the wait because the technical advancements make this second triptych of stories even more visually stunning, and the emotional resonance is even stronger. This is a lean, mean noir thriller that doesn't waste a single moment as it rips through three interlocking plots that centre on revenge for the events of the first movie.

Two people are out to get even with the ruthlessly nasty politician Roark (Powers Booth). Watched over by the hulking Marv (Mickey Rourke), gun-toting stripper Nancy (Jessica Alba) is still heartbroken after Roark killed her beloved Hartigan (Bruce Willis), who appears to her as a ghostly apparition. And Johnny (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) is determined to bring Roark down by humiliating him at his own high-stakes poker game, even though merely having uncanny good luck might not be enough. But the main story centres on private eye Dwight (Josh Brolin), who is stopped in his tracks when he encounters his old flame Ava (Eva Green), a bombshell who has power over most men she meets. She asks for help with a domestic problem, and Dwight is powerless to walk away even though he knows something is fishy.

As before, these stories unfold exactly as they would in a graphic novel, with blunt dialogue and strikingly visual imagery black and white that's spotted with flashes of colour. Aside from Ava's blue coat, that colour is usually red: hair, nails, lips, but not blood, which splashes in glaring white. It looks fantastic in (ahem) eye-popping 3D. And it's fiercely violent as death hovers around the residents of Basin City, especially the lawless Old Town district. But there's just as much emphasis on surging passion, including some surprisingly graphic sexuality that plays up how helpless men are around a scantily clad woman. Indeed, it's rare to see an action film in which the women are so resolutely in charge.

Continue reading: Sin City: A Dame to Kill For Review

Video - Emily Deschanel And David Tennant Are Snapped At FOX Upfronts - Part 4


'Bones' star Emily Deschanel and 'Gracepoint' actor David Tennant were among the TV guests at the FOX Network Upfront presentation held at The Beacon Theater in New York. The latter is new to American television with his crime drama series that is based on the original British series 'Broadchurch'.

Continue: Video - Emily Deschanel And David Tennant Are Snapped At FOX Upfronts - Part 4

Wreck-it Ralph Review


Good

Visually ambitious and packed with inside jokes for arcade gamers, this colourful animated adventure is an enjoyable romp but is probably too energetic for its own good. It simply never settles down so that we can sink into its various settings or get to know its lively characters. So in the end we've enjoyed the talent of the animators and the vocal cast, but we feel rather exhausted.

The story is set in a vintage 1980s arcade game called Fix-it Felix Jr, in which Felix (voiced by McBrayer) must repair damage inflicted by Ralph's (Reilly)massive fists. But after 30 years, Ralph is tired of being the unloved villain. He wants to be the good guy for a change, so heads across the room into another game, the combat role-play adventure Hero's Duty. There he's trained by tough-talking squadron leader Calhoun (Lynch) and battles space insects to win a medal and escape. But a killer bug follows him into the candy-themed road-race game Sugar Rush, threatening the balance of the whole arcade.

The majority of the plot takes place here, as Ralph teams up with unloved "glitch" Vanellope to challenge the smiling tyrant King Candy (Tudyk). Unlike the pixellated Fix-it Felix Jr and the virtual reality of Hero's Duty, Sugar Rush is a pink-hued, delicious-looking land of sugary treats. Each of these games, and the transfer station between them, is populated by spirited characters with their own subplots. And there are also appearances by iconic favourites such as Pac-Man, Mario and Q*bert. So with the different animation styles and eclectic ensemble of characters, our eyes aren't bored for a second.

Continue reading: Wreck-it Ralph Review

Video - Taylor Swift, Jerry Springer And Robert F. Kennedy Jr. Arrive At The Kennedy's Ripple of Hope Awards Dinner


Taylor Swift, Jerry Springer, Alec Baldwin and his wife Hilaria Thomas and Robert F. Kennedy Jr. were among the mass of arrivals for the 2012 Ripple of Hope Awards Dinner at The Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights in New York City.

Continue: Video - Taylor Swift, Jerry Springer And Robert F. Kennedy Jr. Arrive At The Kennedy's Ripple of Hope Awards Dinner

Breach Review


Good
Moving briskly from equivocator Stephen Glass to the chairman of the Benedict Arnold Fan Club, Robert Hanssen, director Billy Ray turns his tonal focus from Shattered Glass's journalistic felony to high crime in the intelligence agency. In what seems to be a new trend of cinematically capturing events before they have actually played out, Breach reenacts what is widely accepted as the greatest fracture of FBI security in the history of the organization.

Following possible terrorists and their contacts, Eric O'Neil (Ryan Phillipe) eagerly tries to discuss bureau protocol with his team, only to be ignored and have his well-prepared report on the subject shoved back in his face. That is, until he is dragged into a bureau conference room on a Sunday to meet with his superior and head agent Kate Burroughs (Laura Linney). It's here that O'Neil is asked to shadow Russian intelligence specialist Robert Hanssen (Chris Cooper) for what is originally agreed to be sexually perverse activities. It isn't till O'Neil is taken under wing by the intelligence expert that Burroughs reveals that Hanssen has actually been selling information to the Russians for some time and has cost the government billions of dollars and uncountable agent lives.

Continue reading: Breach Review

24: Season Four Review


Extraordinary
Before launching with any credibility into my review of 24, I must confess in the church of guilty little pleasures my absolute obsession with the program and the pursuits of its hero, the honorable Mr. Jack Bauer (Kiefer Sutherland). At the mercy of the networks, such devotion and obsession are rewarded with sweaty and torturous weeklong waits. The clock ticks Monday to Sunday with its trademark "beep... beep... beep..." for anxious fans anticipating the coming thrills of a fresh episode. Will the President survive? Will the bomb be launched? Will Michelle end up with Tony? In DVD format, such questions are answered with great expediency, the wait reduced to whatever length of time your anxiety permits, and the resulting real "real time" is the epitome of geekish rushes. 24's fourth season is its best yet and demonstrates most ferociously the brilliance of the program's premise and its suitability to the instantly accessible digital and versatile disc.

Having saved the President from assassination, the country from both nuclear and viral threats, and having been addicted to heroin, lost his wife and had to murder his boss, one understands when in the first moments of season four Jack Bauer is under different employment. No longer at CTU (Counter Terrorist Unit) - in fact not even welcome there - Jack is now the chief bodyguard for Secretary of Defense James Heller (William Devane). Jack's love interest for the day, Audrey Raines (Kim Raver), happens to be his boss' daughter, and when dad and daughter are kidnapped, ransomed and threatened with live web-syndicated trial and execution, Bauer must again brace the corridors of CTU and endeavor to save the day, for the fourth time.

Continue reading: 24: Season Four Review

The Minus Man Review


Terrible
I'm still trying to figure out how to look at The Minus Man. Either it's supposed to be a dark, black comedy, or it's supposed to be a thoughtful, pensive drama/thriller a la Sling Blade.

Either way, it's a dismal failure.

Continue reading: The Minus Man Review

Love and Basketball Review


Grim
Of all of the projects for Spike Lee to attach his name onto, Love and Basketball may go down as one of the most idiotic. Lee produced this Hoop Dreams meets Romeo and Juliet love story and his largest mistake by far was to hand the position of director over to Gina Prince-Bythewood. Prince may have made four films, but she still hasn't gotten it quite right. And, from the looks of it, she won't be getting it right anytime soon.

Love and Basketball concerns Monica Wright (Sanaa Lathan), a basketball loving girl who wants nothing more than to be the first woman in the NBA. Her next door neighbor, Quincy McCall (Omar Epps) is the son of a NBA player and wants nothing more than to follow in his father's footsteps and get some booty along the way. When he realizes (at about age 18) that the booty he has been wanting all along has been living next door, he quickly hooks up with her. Both find themselves going to USC and both find themselves on the USC basketball teams.

Continue reading: Love and Basketball Review

The Thirteenth Floor Review


Grim
I want to start by mentioning that I actually work on the 13th floor of a real live building in downtown San Francisco. My business card actually reads "13th Floor". Reading my business card is more interesting than this film.

Interesting premise: Computer geniuses build a virtual reality machine that lets them go back in time to 1937 Los Angeles. Only the virtual people have feelings and emotions just like us; they don't know they're not real. But then they find out.

Continue reading: The Thirteenth Floor Review

Dennis Haysbert

Dennis Haysbert Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Quotes RSS