Deborah Mailman

Deborah Mailman

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Picture - Deborah Mailman - TV Week... Melbourne Victoria Australia, Sunday 7th April 2013

Deborah Mailman - TV Week Logie Awards at Crown Casino - Press Room - Melbourne, Victoria, Australia - Sunday 7th April 2013

Picture - Shari Sebbens, Miranda Tapsell, Chris... New York City New York United States, Wednesday 13th March 2013

Shari Sebbens, Miranda Tapsell, Chris O'Dowd, Deborah Mailman and Jessica Mauboy - The Weinstein Company presents a special screening of 'The Sapphire' at The Paris Theater - New York City, New York , United States - Wednesday 13th March 2013

Shari Sebbens, Miranda Tapsell, Chris O'Dowd, Deborah Mailman and Jessica Mauboy
Shari Sebbens, Miranda Tapsell, Chris O'Dowd, Deborah Mailman and Jessica Mauboy
Chris O'Dowd
Shari Sebbens, Miranda Tapsell, Chris O'Dowd, Deborah Mailman and Jessica Mauboy
Chris O'Dowd

Mental Review


Even for a riotous Australian black comedy, this film packs in just a bit too much chaos. It's consistently smart and funny, with lively characters and especially witty dialog, but some of the sideroads never go anywhere. Still, there's so much terrific material in here that it's well worth a look for fans of the genre. And it's great to see Collette return home to reunite with her Muriel's Wedding director P.J. Hogan nearly 20 years after they launched their careers.

The story centres on suburban housewife Shirley (Gibney), who is obsessed with The Sound of Music and wishes her unruly family was more like the Von Trapps. But no, her husband (LaPaglia) is the town's philandering mayor, and their five daughters all think they're mentally ill. Then when Shirley herself ends up in a psych ward, Dad brings in the drifter Shaz (Collette) to watch the girls. She takes no prisoners, whipping them into shape while trying to give them some self-respect. She also shows them that the people society considers "normal" are probably crazier than they are. Meanwhile, eldest daughter Coral (Sullivan) gets a job at a shark exhibit run by a salty fisherman (Schreiber) who has a connection with Shaz.

Writer-director Hogan packs the film with rude references to The Sound of Music, from a pastiche pre-title sequence to Shaz's unconventional Maria-like approach to child-rearing (with heavy overtones of Mary Poppins). The film is colourful and sometimes too hyperactive, with Collette often going way over-the-top as the wildly unhinged Shaz, who also upends the life of their compulsive next-door neighbour (Fox). Much of this is simply too wacky for us to go along with, but other scenes are quietly insightful and very, very funny. Often at the same time.

Continue reading: Mental Review

The Sapphires Review


Shamelessly crowd-pleasing, this warmly engaging film is based on a remarkable true story. And since it's topped off by Chris O'Dowd's most engaging performance yet (which is saying a lot), resistance is futile. Surprisingly for a comedy, there are also some startlingly serious moments along the way, as the film touches on racial issues and war violence without getting too heavy.

It's set in 1968, which was just as turbulent in Australia as in America and Europe. In the rural Outback, music promoter Dave (O'Dowd) is looking for new talent while slowly pickling himself in alcohol. Then he discovers three sisters - Gail, Cynthia and Julie (Mailman, Tapsell and Mauboy) - who can actually sing. They call themselves the Cummeraganja Songbirds, but as Aboriginals they're shunned by bigoted white society. So Dave takes them on, giving them a crash-course in soul and helping them secure a gig singing for the troops in Vietnam. Joined by their lighter-skinned cousin Kay (Sebbens), they head into the war zone rebranded as The Sapphires.

Where this goes is both hilarious and unexpectedly intense, and credit should go to the filmmakers for resisting the usual movie structures. Everything comes and goes as it would on the frontline of battle: romances begin and end without big movie climaxes, people are suddenly separated and there isn't time to get too melodramatic even in life-or-death situations. Meanwhile, the filmmakers also stir in an underlying current exploring the civil rights protests of the period in both the US and Australia. All of this adds up to a breezy, enjoyable journey with serious points along the way. And a lot of fabulous music.

Continue reading: The Sapphires Review

Picture - Shari Sebbens, Miranda Tapsell, Chris... , Tuesday 16th October 2012

Shari Sebbens, Miranda Tapsell, Chris O'Dowd, Jessica Mauboy and Deborah Mailman - Shari Sebbens, Miranda Tapsell, Chris O'Dowd, Jessica Mauboy, Deborah Mailman, Tuesday 16th October 2012 at the premiere of 'Sapphires' at The Savoy.

Picture - Shari Sebbens, Miranda Tapsell, Jessica... , Tuesday 16th October 2012

Shari Sebbens, Miranda Tapsell, Jessica Mauboy and Deborah Mailman - Shari Sebbens, Miranda Tapsell, Jessica Mauboy, Deborah Mailman, Tuesday 16th October 2012 at the premiere of 'Sapphires' at The Savoy.

Picture - Shari Sebbens, Miranda Tapsell, Wayne... , Tuesday 16th October 2012

Shari Sebbens, Miranda Tapsell, Wayne Blair, Jessica Mauboy, Deborah Mailman and Chris O'Dowd - Shari Sebbens, Miranda Tapsell, Wayne Blair, Jessica Mauboy, Deborah Mailman, Chris O'Dowd, Tuesday 16th October 2012 at the premiere of 'Sapphires' at The Savoy.

The Sapphires Trailer


Four indigenous Australian women, sisters Gail, Cynthia and Julie and their cousin Kay, are ambitious country and western musicians in 1968 that set out to become stars in the wake of a political bill that increased the rights of the Aborigine people. Following a singing contest in rural Australia, a whiskey drinking Irish musician Dave Lovelace sees their potential and sets out to turn the girls into soul singing global sensations. Although apprehensive at first, the group (known as The Sapphires) soon begin to warm to Lovelace, especially when he manages to secure them a gig performing for US soldiers in Vietnam. It soon becomes a life-changing journey for them as they learn the true importance of friendship, family and bravery.

Continue: The Sapphires Trailer

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