Deborah Kara Unger

Deborah Kara Unger

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Deborah Kara Unger and Guest - The Los Angeles premiere of 'Spring Breakers' held at the Archlight Hollywood - Arrivals - Hollywood, California, United States - Thursday 14th March 2013

Deborah Kara Unger and Guest
Deborah Kara Unger
Deborah Kara Unger

Silent Hill: Revelation 3D Trailer


Heather Mason is now a teenager and has grown up running away from dark forces that are constantly following in her wake. She has just started at her fifth school since the age of eleven and darkness is about to descend upon her once more with a series of terrifying nightmares being just the beginning. She keeps finding herself drifting in and out of horrific alternate realities and being hunted by grotesque demons then, just before her 18th birthday, Heather suspects she is being followed. Soon after, her foster father, Harry, disappears from their home and left behind is a dripping message written on the wall reading 'Come to Silent Hill'. She journeys to the dark place, being stalked by demons as she goes and begins to discover that she is not everything she thought she was.

Continue: Silent Hill: Revelation 3D Trailer

Fury [aka The Samaritan] Review


Very Good
Set in Toronto, this noir thriller gets under the skin due to layered performances from the entire cast. It's a slow build until the final act, but it remains gripping thanks to a snaky plot that gets nastier and scarier as it develops.

After 25 years in prison, con-artist Foley (Jackson) decides to change his life. All his old friends are gone, and his best pal's son Ethan (Kirby) now works for vicious businessman Xavier (Wilkinson). But Ethan brings back the issues Foley is trying to put behind him. Worse, Ethan needs Foley's help for a "samaritan" grift, which involves coming to the aid of the mark to win his trust. Then Foley meets vulnerable young call-girl Iris (Negga), who manages to get under his skin.

Continue reading: Fury [aka The Samaritan] Review

Deborah Kara Unger - Deborah Kara Unger, guest New York City, USA - at the premiere of 'The Way' to benefit the Walkabout Foundation at School of Visual Arts. Wednesday 5th October 2011

Deborah Kara Unger
Deborah Kara Unger

Deborah Kara Unger Wednesday 16th April 2008 The World Premiere of '88 Minutes' held at at Planet Hollywood Hotel Casino - Arrivals Las Vegas, Nevada

Deborah Kara Unger
Deborah Kara Unger

Silent Hill Review


Very Good
I have not played the video game upon which this film is based, and I assume that that's not a prerequisite. If the game is anywhere as creepy and odd as this movie, perhaps I should. The plot concerns a typical family with atypical problems, their young daughter Sharon (played by the J-horror-haired Jodelle Ferland) is a sleepwalker and it seems as though her somnambulistic journeys take her further and further from the safety of home (in the opening minutes of the movie we see her standing atop a particularly dangerous cliff face). Her parents Rose (Radha Mitchell) and the dour Christopher (Sean Bean) are at odds over what to do. Christopher opts for medication, while Rose decides to follow Sharon's lead. When she's dreaming, Sharon mentions a town called Silent Hill. Rose decides she'd better bring Sharon to the town and find out just what all the fuss is about. Turns out, Silent Hill is off limits - the place is a ghost town after a disastrous fire. And the fire still burns under its decaying crust.

A car accident, a nosy cop on a motorcycle (Deborah Kara Unger), and Sharon's escaping into the deserted town that rains ash, all collide in a chain reaction that leads Rose into a literal heart of darkness. Silent Hill, the town, inhabits a peculiar limbo - it is quite literally cut off from the rest of the world - where air raid sirens (surely some of the creepiest sound effects you're ever likely to hear in a film) precede the coming of a dark tide that washes over the ghost town with surprising regularity. With the arrival of the eldritch dark, the walls literally shred away, revealing an industrial hellscape that lies somewhere beneath the reality of the decaying town, populated by human-faced, screaming insects, twisted lava infants, and something called "Pyramid Head," that has an incredibly unwieldy helmet and one of the largest swords in cinema history. It's a brutal, dark, and hideous place and the highlight of the film.

Continue reading: Silent Hill Review

Between Strangers Review


Very Good
Between Strangers? Hmmm, sounds like a softcore porn movie. Turns out it's a weepy melodrama starring a generation-bounding collection of movie stars.

Ever since Short Cuts won accolades, we get a yearly version of this movie, a sometimes thoughtful collection of stories, none large enough to stand alone as a feature film, some to slight to merit any attention at all. Between Strangers mitigates this problem by focusing on the stories of three women, all wrestling with past mistakes or old regrets.

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Ten Tiny Love Stories Review


Very Good
A curious movie experiment, you see films like Ten Tiny Love Stories from time to time, with varying degrees of success. At its core, this is a fictional, ensemble version of The Vagina Monologues, with -- as the title suggests -- ten women speaking five-minute to 15-minute monologues directly to the camera. However, very few involve love of any kind. Instead they're almost all about sex.

The stories are all over the map. Alicia Witt tells a short piece about her first time. Kimberly Williams tells a long piece about a tryst with a Greek waiter. Most of the stories involve being spurned by the man -- whether it's a one-night stand or a long-time relationship. While they're all fictional (and I'm assuming Rodrigo García is a man), they come off as extremely real, with a good half of the actresses appearing on the verge of tears during their monologues.

Continue reading: Ten Tiny Love Stories Review

White Noise Review


Terrible
White Noise is predicated on an intriguing process called Electronic Voice Phenomenon (EVP) where the dead contact the living through televisions, telephones, and radios. Some may think it's ridiculous, but EVP has long been a fascination for ghost researchers. It's also been the basis for some of the creepiest and most disturbing horror movies ever made, like The Ring and Poltergeist. But with White Noise, we receive mixed signals and a new broadcast that becomes a boring waiting game for the thrills to begin.

Michael Keaton is Jonathan Rivers, a successful architect and loving husband to his pregnant novelist wife Anna (Chandra West) and father to his son Mike (Nicholas Elia), from a previous marriage. After Anna's sudden disappearance and subsequent death, a man named Raymond Price (Ian McNeice) contacts Jonathan claiming he's been receiving messages from Anna on the other side. Desperate to be connected once again with his wife, Jonathan begins a dangerous obsession with EVP.

Continue reading: White Noise Review

A Love Song For Bobby Long Review


OK
In a year-end blitz of small films about dysfunctional, broken families (e.g., Around the Bend) comes this variation on the theme set in a tacky section of New Orleans. While a confident cast ultimately makes something of the drama, a certain awkwardness in the storytelling sets up discordant side tracks as it attempts to live up to its title.

Purslane "Pursy" Hominy Will (Scarlett Johansson) has lived most of her 18-year life without the mother from whom she's estranged but whose memory she cherishes. As a teenage independent she's become hardened and jaded beyond her years. When her live-in boyfriend tells her that he received word of Lorraine's death several days after the fact, she rages at the dumbshit for neglecting to let her know right away. She storms out of the house with all her possessions and buses her way from Florida back to the town she grew up in and to her childhood home, a day too late to make the funeral.

Continue reading: A Love Song For Bobby Long Review

Thirteen Review


OK
You can't argue that the film Thirteen doesn't know its teenagers. It gets all the obsessions and silly little dramas just right - the autobiographical script was written by one of the film's stars when she herself was thirteen - but just knowing the milieu isn't always going to create gripping drama.

After an opening scene in which 13-year-old Tracy (Evan Rachel Wood) and her friend Evie (Nikki Reed, the writer) suck gas from a can of compressed air, laugh hysterically, and slap each other senseless, Thirteen flashes back to four months earlier, in order that we can get an idea of how Tracy got this way. Tracy's family situation is nothing spectacular, what with a distant father who only occasionally pays child support and a flaky mom (Holly Hunter) who scrapes by as a hairdresser and keeps letting Brady, her former cokehead boyfriend (Jeremy Sisto), sleep over. Her life seems pretty dull and irritating, so when Tracy ditches her nerdy friends to suck up to Evie, the lead Heather in the school's hottest clique, it makes an adolescent kind of sense. But when that friendship quickly morphs into an unending stream of shoplifting and drinking, Tracy also starts lashing out at her mother and pretty much everyone else around her, except Evie, who has essentially moved herself into Tracy's bedroom.

Continue reading: Thirteen Review

Fear X Review


Good

It's a rare movie that holds back information, allowing the audience to get inside it and ask questions about its strange universe, like Nicolas Winding Refn's "Fear X."

The film stars John Turturro as Harry Caine, a mall security guard who becomes obsessed with finding his wife's murderer, which was captured, muddy and distant, on the mall's video security system.

Like another angle on Michelangelo Antonioni's "Blow-Up," the plot follows Harry as he studies the tapes and digital pictures, looking for connections and clues. He becomes obsessed with a house across the street from his own, breaks in and finds a strip of film -- a vague clue that leads him to Montana. Once there, his crosses paths with a cop (James Remar) and his wife (Deborah Kara Unger).

Continue reading: Fear X Review

The Salton Sea Review


OK

A handsomely stylish, semi-punk, drug-culture updating of the wronged-man's-revenge film noir plot, "The Salton Sea" has one of the most enticingly, quintessentially film noir opening scenes I've ever seen.

Picture this: Val Kilmer, dressed as a hep cat who just finished a gig at a downtown jazz club, sits on the floor of his burning apartment. Leaning on a wall, silhouetted against the orange flames, he's playing his trumpet and bleeding -- possibly to death -- from a gunshot wound. A bag full of money lies beside him with wads of bills spilling out onto the floor beside him.

"My name is Tom Van Allen. Or Danny Parker. I honestly don't know any more," he breathes in a honeyed, genre-perfect voice-over. "You can decide -- yeah, maybe you can help me, friend. You can help me decide who I am. Avenging Angel? Judas Iscariot? Loving husband? Trumpet player? Speed freak?"

Continue reading: The Salton Sea Review

Deborah Kara Unger

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Deborah Kara Unger Movies

Silent Hill: Revelation 3D Trailer

Silent Hill: Revelation 3D Trailer

Heather Mason is now a teenager and has grown up running away from dark forces...

Fury [aka The Samaritan] Movie Review

Fury [aka The Samaritan] Movie Review

Set in Toronto, this noir thriller gets under the skin due to layered performances from...

The Way Movie Review

The Way Movie Review

This thoughtful, openly emotive film resists cynicism due to its quiet honesty. As a story...

Silent Hill Movie Review

Silent Hill Movie Review

I have not played the video game upon which this film is based, and I...

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Sunshine Movie Review

Sunshine Movie Review

Now that the 20th century is finally over, I guess it's time to start re-interpreting...

The Salton Sea Movie Review

The Salton Sea Movie Review

The imagery of The Salton Sea surpasses standard noir. It's a tale of a...

Crash (1997) Movie Review

Crash (1997) Movie Review

Kinky sex? Intentional car wrecks? Extreme underground perversion? A year and a...

White Noise Movie Review

White Noise Movie Review

White Noise is predicated on an intriguing process called Electronic Voice Phenomenon (EVP) where the...

A Love Song For Bobby Long Movie Review

A Love Song For Bobby Long Movie Review

In a year-end blitz of small films about dysfunctional, broken families (e.g., Around the Bend)...

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