Deborah Kara Unger

Deborah Kara Unger

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The Los Angeles premiere of 'Spring Breakers'

Deborah Kara Unger and Guest - The Los Angeles premiere of 'Spring Breakers' held at the Archlight Hollywood - Arrivals - Hollywood, California, United States - Thursday 14th March 2013

Deborah Kara Unger
Deborah Kara Unger

Silent Hill: Revelation 3D Trailer


Heather Mason is now a teenager and has grown up running away from dark forces that are constantly following in her wake. She has just started at her fifth school since the age of eleven and darkness is about to descend upon her once more with a series of terrifying nightmares being just the beginning. She keeps finding herself drifting in and out of horrific alternate realities and being hunted by grotesque demons then, just before her 18th birthday, Heather suspects she is being followed. Soon after, her foster father, Harry, disappears from their home and left behind is a dripping message written on the wall reading 'Come to Silent Hill'. She journeys to the dark place, being stalked by demons as she goes and begins to discover that she is not everything she thought she was.

Continue: Silent Hill: Revelation 3D Trailer

Fury [aka The Samaritan] Review


Good
Set in Toronto, this noir thriller gets under the skin due to layered performances from the entire cast. It's a slow build until the final act, but it remains gripping thanks to a snaky plot that gets nastier and scarier as it develops.

After 25 years in prison, con-artist Foley (Jackson) decides to change his life. All his old friends are gone, and his best pal's son Ethan (Kirby) now works for vicious businessman Xavier (Wilkinson). But Ethan brings back the issues Foley is trying to put behind him. Worse, Ethan needs Foley's help for a "samaritan" grift, which involves coming to the aid of the mark to win his trust. Then Foley meets vulnerable young call-girl Iris (Negga), who manages to get under his skin.

Continue reading: Fury [aka The Samaritan] Review

at the premiere of 'The Way' to benefit the Walkabout Foundation at School of Visual Arts.

Deborah Kara Unger - Deborah Kara Unger, guest New York City, USA - at the premiere of 'The Way' to benefit the Walkabout Foundation at School of Visual Arts. Wednesday 5th October 2011

at the premiere of 'The Way' to benefit the Walkabout Foundation at School of Visual Arts.

Deborah Kara Unger Wednesday 5th October 2011 at the premiere of 'The Way' to benefit the Walkabout Foundation at School of Visual Arts. New York City, USA

The Way Review


Excellent
This thoughtful, openly emotive film resists cynicism due to its quiet honesty.

As a story of self-discovery, it may seem a little simplistic, but the themes it grapples with along the way are genuinely challenging.

Tom (Sheen) is a California ophthalmologist whose only son Daniel (Estevez) dropped out of society in his late 30s to travel the world. Then Tom gets a call: Daniel has died on the Camino de Santiago (The Way of St James) in northern Spain. In France to collect the body, Tom suddenly decides to take the two-month pilgrimage himself, partly to understand his son better. Along the way he collects three companions who just won't leave him alone: a jaded Canadian (Unger), a too-cheerful Dutchman (van Wageningen) and a jagged Irishman (Nesbitt).

Continue reading: The Way Review

The World Premiere of '88 Minutes' held at at Planet Hollywood Hotel Casino - Arrivals

Deborah Kara Unger Wednesday 16th April 2008 The World Premiere of '88 Minutes' held at at Planet Hollywood Hotel Casino - Arrivals Las Vegas, Nevada

Deborah Kara Unger

Sunshine (2000) Review


Excellent
Now that the 20th century is finally over, I guess it's time to start re-interpreting it. Hopefully, summarizers of the century will follow the example of Hungarian director Istvan Svabo and honestly face the truth, no matter how painful. (Unfortunately, many intellectuals don't always seem interested in the truth --- especially about subjects like communism, which many continue to embrace.)

In Sunshine, Svabo looks back through the last 100 years of his country's history for meaning, and finds some --- enough to fill a three-hour, soapy epic about the century's chaos. The film mostly works, and is a worthy addition to Svabo's art.

Continue reading: Sunshine (2000) Review

Silent Hill Review


Good
I have not played the video game upon which this film is based, and I assume that that's not a prerequisite. If the game is anywhere as creepy and odd as this movie, perhaps I should. The plot concerns a typical family with atypical problems, their young daughter Sharon (played by the J-horror-haired Jodelle Ferland) is a sleepwalker and it seems as though her somnambulistic journeys take her further and further from the safety of home (in the opening minutes of the movie we see her standing atop a particularly dangerous cliff face). Her parents Rose (Radha Mitchell) and the dour Christopher (Sean Bean) are at odds over what to do. Christopher opts for medication, while Rose decides to follow Sharon's lead. When she's dreaming, Sharon mentions a town called Silent Hill. Rose decides she'd better bring Sharon to the town and find out just what all the fuss is about. Turns out, Silent Hill is off limits - the place is a ghost town after a disastrous fire. And the fire still burns under its decaying crust.

A car accident, a nosy cop on a motorcycle (Deborah Kara Unger), and Sharon's escaping into the deserted town that rains ash, all collide in a chain reaction that leads Rose into a literal heart of darkness. Silent Hill, the town, inhabits a peculiar limbo - it is quite literally cut off from the rest of the world - where air raid sirens (surely some of the creepiest sound effects you're ever likely to hear in a film) precede the coming of a dark tide that washes over the ghost town with surprising regularity. With the arrival of the eldritch dark, the walls literally shred away, revealing an industrial hellscape that lies somewhere beneath the reality of the decaying town, populated by human-faced, screaming insects, twisted lava infants, and something called "Pyramid Head," that has an incredibly unwieldy helmet and one of the largest swords in cinema history. It's a brutal, dark, and hideous place and the highlight of the film.

Continue reading: Silent Hill Review

Sunshine Review


Excellent
Now that the 20th century is finally over, I guess it's time to start re-interpreting it. Hopefully, summarizers of the century will follow the example of Hungarian director Istvan Svabo and honestly face the truth, no matter how painful. (Unfortunately, many intellectuals don't always seem interested in the truth --- especially about subjects like communism, which many continue to embrace.)

In Sunshine, Svabo looks back through the last 100 years of his country's history for meaning, and finds some --- enough to fill a three-hour, soapy epic about the century's chaos. The film mostly works, and is a worthy addition to Svabo's art.

Continue reading: Sunshine Review

White Noise Review


Unbearable
White Noise is predicated on an intriguing process called Electronic Voice Phenomenon (EVP) where the dead contact the living through televisions, telephones, and radios. Some may think it's ridiculous, but EVP has long been a fascination for ghost researchers. It's also been the basis for some of the creepiest and most disturbing horror movies ever made, like The Ring and Poltergeist. But with White Noise, we receive mixed signals and a new broadcast that becomes a boring waiting game for the thrills to begin.

Michael Keaton is Jonathan Rivers, a successful architect and loving husband to his pregnant novelist wife Anna (Chandra West) and father to his son Mike (Nicholas Elia), from a previous marriage. After Anna's sudden disappearance and subsequent death, a man named Raymond Price (Ian McNeice) contacts Jonathan claiming he's been receiving messages from Anna on the other side. Desperate to be connected once again with his wife, Jonathan begins a dangerous obsession with EVP.

Continue reading: White Noise Review

The Game Review


Excellent
Any more of that brooding atmosphere and I might have to strangle myself. I don't know how Michael Douglas does it, much less manage to keep himself alive and kicking through two hours of torment, all of which may or may not be a fantasy "game" his brother (Sean Penn) has enrolled him in. Douglas plays an uber-rich tycoon who has everything he could want and is bored to tears with all of it. When kid brother promises the game will fill in what's lacking in his life, Mikie finds himself drawn to it, and a labyrinthine all-too-realistic game of murder, deceit, and betrayal begins. Set in my newly adopted home of San Francisco, I find this city full enough of intrigue even without machine gun-toting assassins and attack dogs chasing me around back alleys. And I can't imagine what I'd do if a cabbie drove us into San Francisco Bay... but I suppose that's why you have to watch the movie.

Continue reading: The Game Review

The Hurricane Review


Good
If anyone even dares to hum the lyrics of the Bob Dylan song, I'm going to have to kill them. All right. So this is an empty threat. I have zero way of knowing whether or not you are humming the Bob Dylan song just to spite me, but please don't do it anyway. After seeing The Hurricane, I have Bob Dylan stuck in my head.

In fact, Bob Dylan and Denzel Washington are about the only things stuck in my head after that movie... that and enormous sense of racial injustice and a newfound respect for the residents of Toronto.

Continue reading: The Hurricane Review

Stander Review


Weak
Johannesburg. The late '70s. Nelson Mandela is still in jail. Cries of "Amandla!" ("Freedom!") still ring from protesters. White police still put down these riots with brutality. Andre Stander (Thomas Jane) is an appalled police captain, complicit in these acts. Stander tells the true story of what happens when he can take no more, with surprisingly tepid results.

The film opens with a brief window on Stander's life. He's just re-married his ex, Bekkie (Deborah Kara Unger). His star is on the rise in the department. All is well. Until he finds himself shooting an unarmed black youth during a particularly bloody demonstration. He can't shake the feeling that the "wrong people" are dying. He resigns from Riot Patrol, only to find that when everyone else is out on that task, "a white man can get away with anything." So he does. As if on a whim, he robs a bank.

Continue reading: Stander Review

Thirteen Review


Weak
You can't argue that the film Thirteen doesn't know its teenagers. It gets all the obsessions and silly little dramas just right - the autobiographical script was written by one of the film's stars when she herself was thirteen - but just knowing the milieu isn't always going to create gripping drama.

After an opening scene in which 13-year-old Tracy (Evan Rachel Wood) and her friend Evie (Nikki Reed, the writer) suck gas from a can of compressed air, laugh hysterically, and slap each other senseless, Thirteen flashes back to four months earlier, in order that we can get an idea of how Tracy got this way. Tracy's family situation is nothing spectacular, what with a distant father who only occasionally pays child support and a flaky mom (Holly Hunter) who scrapes by as a hairdresser and keeps letting Brady, her former cokehead boyfriend (Jeremy Sisto), sleep over. Her life seems pretty dull and irritating, so when Tracy ditches her nerdy friends to suck up to Evie, the lead Heather in the school's hottest clique, it makes an adolescent kind of sense. But when that friendship quickly morphs into an unending stream of shoplifting and drinking, Tracy also starts lashing out at her mother and pretty much everyone else around her, except Evie, who has essentially moved herself into Tracy's bedroom.

Continue reading: Thirteen Review

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