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Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales Trailer


Jack Sparrow finds himself in constant trouble with the law; not only is his name known from ocean to ocean, his face is now just as famous. With a reward of two hundred pounds Jack is being chased by bounty hunters once again. Not only are naval officers pursuing him, he also has a number of former rival captains hot on his heels too.

Captain Barbossa is now in control of the ship The Queen Anne's Revenge, after winning it from Captain Blackbeard and a long-time nemesis of Jack's called Captain Salazar who doesn't want to just kill Jack, he wants to kill every pirate on the sea in a bid to be once and for all to be total control over the oceans.

When Jack learns of Salazar's plan, the lovable rogue and Salazar go head to head in a race to retrieve a Trident that once belonged to the god of the oceans Poseidon. Whoever holds the trident controls the power of the sea and everything that lives in or sails on it.

Continue: Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales Trailer

Lion Trailer


Saroo Brierley has lived a good life with his caring mother and father in Australia, but as he grows older, memories begin to return to Saroo of his life before he was adopted.

When he was young, Saroo lived with his family in a small village and since the father of the family left years earlier, Saroo's mother looks after him, his 2 elder brothers and young sister; she works as often as she can to feed and care for her children but often that just wasn't enough. Wishing to help the family, the two elder boys would often go off and beg at the busy railway station and find occasional work helping sweep trains.

When Guddu announces that he's going to the train station, his younger brother (Saroo) asks if he can go with him, he accepts and the boys set out on their journey. With his little brother feeling tired, Guddu leaves his brother to rest and tells him to stay where he is. The five year old did what he was told for a while but soon grew impatient by his brother's absence, he decides to go look around the train station and eventually falls asleep on a stationary train thinking his brother would know where he was. When the little boy awakes he finds himself speeding through unfamiliar landscapes with no way to escape.

Continue: Lion Trailer

Oranges And Sunshine Review


Excellent
For his feature-directing debut, Jim Loach (son of Ken) tackles a big story with topical relevance and emotional undercurrents. It's an earnest, straightforward film that's intensely moving and never sentimental.

In 1986 Nottingham, Margaret Humphreys (Watson) stumbles into something that seems unthinkable: poor children in the 1950s were bundled onto ships and sent to Australia, where they were stripped of their identities and put into indentured service at children's homes. As she starts investigating, in order to help now-grown children find long-lost parents, she realises that this is just the tip of the iceberg. Assisted by two of these orphans (Weaving and Wenham), she uncovers a horrific system that ran for four decades with complicity from both governments.

Continue reading: Oranges And Sunshine Review

Oranges And Sunshine Trailer


Oranges And Sunshine tells the story of Oranges And Sunshine Margaret Humphreys, a woman who works as a post-adoption social worker in the North of England. Maraget receives a letter from an Australian citizen informing her that as a child she was taken from the UK over to the country she now calls home but wishes to trace her past.

Continue: Oranges And Sunshine Trailer

Legend Of The Guardians: The Owls Of Ga'Hoole Review


Excellent
Spectacular animation and a terrific voice cast go a long way to making this soaring adventure feel much more original than it is. Despite heavy echoes of other movies, it's thoroughly engaging and often genuinely thrilling.

Soren (voiced by Sturgess) is an idealistic owlet who dreams of one day meeting his heroes, the mythical Guardians of Ga'Hoole. Then he and his brother Kludd (Kwanten) are kidnapped by the evil Pure Ones, led by Queen Nyra (Mirren) and Metalbeak (Edgerton), as slaves for their nefarious plan. In their wasteland hideout, Soren meets the feisty dwarf owl Gylfie (Barclay), and they flee to Ga'Hoole for help. There, Soren meets the quirky Ezylryb (Rush), who helps teach him to fly properly and punctures some of his heroic ideals before they head into battle.

Continue reading: Legend Of The Guardians: The Owls Of Ga'Hoole Review

Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole Trailer


The Guardians of Ga'Hoole are sworn to protect the innocent from trouble and vanquish evil. Soren is a young owl who's grown up listening to his father tell the stories of The Gaurdians. His dream is to one day join his heroes and be a part of that noble life he's learnt so much about.

Continue: Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole Trailer

Public Enemies Review


Excellent
Combining artful filmmaking with a true story, this internalised thriller keeps us thoroughly involved in the experiences of a notorious anti-hero. And superb acting makes sure that we care what happens to him.

In 1933, John Dillinger (Depp) is America's public enemy No 1, the top target for FBI chief Hoover (Crudup) and his top agent Purvis (Bale). And the brazen nature of his bank-robbing spree makes the Feds even more irate. But as Dillinger falls for the exotic Billie (Cotillard), his colleagues are being captured or killed. Dillinger may be able to slip out of prison, but without his trusted friends, he's forced to work with unpredictable gangsters like Baby Face Nelson (Graham) and Alvin Karpis (Ribisi). And the agents are closing in.

Continue reading: Public Enemies Review

Dust (2001) Review


Bad
Here's a uniquely bad movie that combines not one unwatchable story, but two!

It begins when a punk kid breaks into an old woman's house. The old lady overpowers him, and forces him to listen to a story. She even ends up in a hospital, and the kid follows her there to keep hearing this damn story.

Continue reading: Dust (2001) Review

Australia Review


OK
It takes a half hour before you're able to put a finger on the tone and tactic of Baz Luhrmann's Australia. First steps are taken on shaky legs until the sweeping picture hits its stride. After that, you're given an additional two-and-a-half-hours to determine whether or not you like what's attempted.

At 165 minutes, Australia is ambitious to a point -- and then, to a fault. You can actually point to two movies jockeying for position on screen (well, one full story and the seeds of another). And while I quite liked the primary story, the third-act coda struck me as fodder for a potential sequel I wasn't prepared to sit through at the time.

Continue reading: Australia Review

The Children Of Huang Shi Review


Bad
Roger Spottiswoode's limp The Children of Huang Shi sounds, looks, and feels like a chapter torn from a dusty history textbook that was relevant somewhere in the mid-1960s. Every revelation feels like a lesson being thrust upon the viewer, every character a simple metaphor for their nationality's opinion toward (and hand in) the Japanese occupation of China that culminated in the Rape of Nanking in the winter of 1937. Here, the Chinese were honorable soldiers from a conflicted country, the Japanese were buffoonish barbarians who still took their shirt off before they decapitated people, the British were naive and in way over their heads, and the Americans just wanted to get married.

As the film's pre-script enlightens us, Children follows the life of George Hogg (Jonathan Rhys Davies), a British journalist who steals the identity of a Red Cross worker to sneak into Nanking and get the story and the pictures of the massacres. After being captured, he almost meets the business-end of Tokyo steel before Hansheng (Chow Yun-Fat, not having fun with a mostly-American dialect), a resistance fighter, saves him from the blade. Hansheng sends Hogg off to the titular village, which serves as a sort of city for lost children, held in check by Dr. Pearson (Radha Mitchell), an actual Red Cross medic.

Continue reading: The Children Of Huang Shi Review

300 Trailer


300
Trailer

300, one of the highlights of the Berlin Film Festival, had its world premiere last night and received a standing ovation in the sold out Berlinale Palast. The film inspired by the work of graphic novelist Frank Miller, was attended by director Zack Snyder and cast members Gerard Butler (King Leonidas) and Rodrigo Santoro (Xerxes).

300 is a ferocious retelling of the ancient Battle of Thermopylae in which King Leonidas and 300 Spartans fought to the death against Xerxes and his massive Persian army. Facing insurmountable odds, their valor and sacrifice inspire all of Greece to unite against their Persian enemy, drawing a line in the sand for democracy. The film brings Miller’s (Sin City) acclaimed graphic novel to life by combining live action with virtual backgrounds that capture his distinct vision of this ancient historic tale.

Russian Doll Review


Very Good
See Matrix bad guy Hugo Weaving play a loveable schlub in Russian Doll, featuring Weaving as an Aussie P.I. who agrees to marry his best friend's Russian mistress so she can stay in the country indefinitely. Sound like a recipe for disaster? Surprisingly, Russian Doll is short on the hijinks you might expect from this genre, focusing more on the quaint romance that develops (of course) and the mild culture clash between the two conspirators. Generally amusing.

The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review


Excellent
Peter Jackson returns with his third and final installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy with the explosive - and exhausting - conclusion to his acclaimed series. Let's cut to the chase: Jackson's final entry is the best of the series, largely thanks to his pushing the boundaries of digital effects to their very limits.

Picking up after a flashback to Sméagol/Gollum's discovery of the ring many years earlier, the film then takes us back to the twin stories from Fellowship andThe Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers: Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and company are basking in the glory of victory at Helm's Deep and Isengard, while Frodo (Elijah Wood), Sam (Sean Astin), and Gollum trek toward Mount Doom to destroy the ring.

Continue reading: The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review

The Proposition Review


Excellent

The opening of John Hillcoat's The Proposition wastes no time getting you in the mood. Four or five criminals are being shot at in a small shack and quickly answer back with ample fire power. Blood spurts everywhere, and two Asian prostitutes are quickly disposed of.

It's the 1880s: Dirt and dust are on the rise and hygiene is sadly in decline. The Burns brothers have been split up: Eddie (Danny Huston) has run off into the desert caves of Australia while Charlie (Guy Pearce) and Mike (Richard Wilson) have gotten snagged in a gunfight. The captain of the local English sheriffs, Captain Stanley (a brooding Ray Winstone), has ordered the hanging of Mike but tells Charlie that if he kills Eddie, he will turn them both free.

Continue reading: The Proposition Review

The Crocodile Hunter: Collision Course Review


Good
Steve Irwin brings his popular Animal Planet antics to the big screen in The Crocodile Hunter: Collision Course. Irwin plays a hardly fictionalized version of himself in which he tackles the wildest of outback prey. The film's poorly constructed plot centers on a crocodile that has gobbled a key piece from a U.S. spy satellite that has blown up and fallen into the Australian bush. The CIA wants it back so they send some bumbling agents down under to find it. Bad news for them, because Steve Irwin and his wife Terri think they're poachers who want the crocodile dead in order to make handbags and belts.

The plot doesn't matter (and even Crocodile Dundee took care of that). Irwin is the real show here - everything else just distracts from him. The movie is just another episode of his popular television series. While in the Outback, he gets up close and personal with spiders, lizards, crocodiles, and snakes. Speaking directly to the camera, he gives us a fairly useful education about these different animals while Terri provides additional commentary (think commercial spokesperson). It's all very interesting stuff and Irwin's humor and quick wit is enough to keep the lessons entertaining and the action scenes believable.

Continue reading: The Crocodile Hunter: Collision Course Review

The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review


Excellent
Peter Jackson returns with his third and final installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy with the explosive - and exhausting - conclusion to his acclaimed series. Let's cut to the chase: Jackson's final entry is the best of the series, largely thanks to his pushing the boundaries of digital effects to their very limits.

Picking up after a flashback to Sméagol/Gollum's discovery of the ring many years earlier, the film then takes us back to the twin stories from Fellowship and The Two Towers: Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and company are basking in the glory of victory at Helm's Deep and Isengard, while Frodo (Elijah Wood), Sam (Sean Astin), and Gollum trek toward Mount Doom to destroy the ring.

Continue reading: The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review

Dust Review


Bad
Here's a uniquely bad movie that combines not one unwatchable story, but two!

It begins when a punk kid breaks into an old woman's house. The old lady overpowers him, and forces him to listen to a story. She even ends up in a hospital, and the kid follows her there to keep hearing this damn story.

Continue reading: Dust Review

Russian Doll Review


Very Good
See Matrix bad guy Hugo Weaving play a loveable schlub in Russian Doll, featuring Weaving as an Aussie P.I. who agrees to marry his best friend's Russian mistress so she can stay in the country indefinitely. Sound like a recipe for disaster? Surprisingly, Russian Doll is short on the hijinks you might expect from this genre, focusing more on the quaint romance that develops (of course) and the mild culture clash between the two conspirators. Generally amusing.

Van Helsing Review


Weak
Mary Shelley and Bram Stoker receive zero writing credit for Stephen Sommers' lopsided Van Helsing, and you can hear the immortal authors breathing a sigh of relief from beyond the grave. The novelists' legendary creatures may receive prominent placement in Universal Studio's big-budget rollercoaster ride, but the half-baked ideas propping up the mediocre monster mash belong solely to writer/director Sommers - for better or for worse.

Van Helsing ends up as a high-concept adrenaline rush that never stops generating lesser concepts over its elongated 145-minute run time. Wheels start turning when Count Dracula (Richard Roxburgh) funds the creation of the Frankenstein monster (Shuler Hensley) to power a machine that will allow the vampire's offspring to live. The prince of darkness is trying to please his voracious brides, while the final descendent of a line of Transylvanian vampire hunters (Kate Beckinsale) is trying in vain to stake the brute before he ends her life. The wild card in this mix is Van Helsing (Hugh Jackman), a hired gun with a guilty conscience working for the Catholic Church to vanquish various evil beings.

Continue reading: Van Helsing Review

Van Helsing Review


Zero

The epitome of everything that's wrong with $150 million B-movies, "Van Helsing" is an inane, soulless, 19th century vampire-hunting action flick of computer-F/X overkill and ham-fisted actors chewing on stale catch-phrase dialogue (when dialogue is even allowed) as if it's a mouthful of bubblegum with the flavor long gone.

Despite being inspired (if you can even call it that) by a character in "Dracula" and lifting a slew of monsters from other classic horror tales too, the picture has little story to speak of -- just a few minutes about Bram Stoker's bloodsucking Count using the electrifying re-animation technique of Mary Shelley's Dr. Frankenstein to zap life into thousands of his gestating offspring that hang in slimy pods all over his castle lair.

So since writer-director Stephen Sommers (who clearly blew all his talent on "The Mummy" -- as anyone who's seen "The Mummy Returns" can attest) couldn't be bothered with anything more than Cliffs-Notes plot and character development, I'm going to respond in kind -- not bothering with a structured review and instead simply listing examples of the twaddle and tripe that pass for script and storytelling in this laughable example of Hollywood's numbing, style-without-substance approach to summer movies.

Continue reading: Van Helsing Review

David Wenham

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David Wenham Movies

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales Movie Review

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales Movie Review

Subtitled Salazar's Revenge in the UK, this fifth film in the long-running series never quite...

Pirates Of The Caribbean 5: Dead Men Tell No Tales (Salazar's Revenge) Featurette and Trailer

Pirates Of The Caribbean 5: Dead Men Tell No Tales (Salazar's Revenge) Featurette and Trailer

It seems Captain Jack Sparrow has been sailing the seas as a pirate for many,...

Pirates of the Caribbean 5: Dead Men Tell No Tales Trailer

Pirates of the Caribbean 5: Dead Men Tell No Tales Trailer

Forget Davy Jones' Locker and the Fountain of Youth, Captain Jack Sparrow is on an...

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales Trailer

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales Trailer

Jack Sparrow finds himself in constant trouble with the law; not only is his name...

Lion Trailer

Lion Trailer

Saroo Brierley has lived a good life with his caring mother and father in Australia,...

Blinky Bill The Movie Trailer

Blinky Bill The Movie Trailer

Blinky Bill has always considered himself an explorer, the kind of Koala that's willing to...

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The Turning Movie Review

The Turning Movie Review

Life-changing moments feature in each of the nine short films in this Australian anthology, and...

300: Rise of an Empire Movie Review

300: Rise of an Empire Movie Review

Fans of the 2007 Spartan war romp 300 probably won't care that this spin-off is...

300: Rise Of An Empire Trailer

300: Rise Of An Empire Trailer

When Leonidas and his valiant army of 300 Spartans were wiped out by the vast...

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