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Wonder Woman Trailer


Diana is a princess and one of the best fighters on the island she was raised on. Her homeland was very different to what we know, it's a beautiful paradise inhabited only by women and Diana herself was brought to like by the mighty god Zeus. When a body washes up on the shore of the island, Diana cannot believe what she sees, a man has somehow found his way to their land and is in need of help.

Nursing the his back to help, the two bond and Diana learns that the man, an American pilot by the name of Steve Trevor was flying a plane when he crashed and found himself at her mercy. Steve regales many tail about the outside world and tells Diana of a catastrophic world war that's currently happening.

Moved by the pilot's stories, much to the dismay of the queen, Diana decides to leave her homeland and help fight with the Allies. The new outer world is a completely different place for Diana and she soon sees that life is very different for women outside of her normal environment. Demonstrating her fierce fighting method and lasso and sword skills, the superhero learns that her abilities are needed to protect the humans and must only be used for the greater good.

Continue: Wonder Woman Trailer

The Conjuring 2 Trailer


Not fazed by their previous experiences, Lorraine and Ed Warren are still successful paranormal investigators and their reputations have made them known around the world. As they hunt for new cases to investigate they decide to travel to England, Enfield just outside London to help a single mother and her children who are being haunted by a nasty spirit. 

Continue: The Conjuring 2 Trailer

Anomalisa Review

Essential

As he did in films like Being John Malkovich and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Charlie Kaufman continues to explore the nature of human identity in this bracingly original stop-motion animated feature. It's an exquisitely crafted drama following a man and woman who find a way to see beyond the sameness of the world around them. And with his co-director Duke Johnson, Kaufman creates a witty, complex, dreamlike world that's unashamedly aimed at grown-ups.

It's the story of Michael (voiced by David Thewlis), an efficiency expert who travels to Cincinnati to deliver a lecture at a conference. But his mind is preoccupied with Bella, an ex who lives there. He phones his wife and son to clear his conscience before arranging to meet Bella in his hotel. Then later that evening he runs into Lisa (Jennifer Jason Leigh), a fan of his book who feels like such an anomaly that she can't quite believe that Michael might be interested in her. But there's a spark of attraction between them, something that feels rare in this soft, bland place.

This is a story about how life is essentially selfish and lonely, only livened up by hopeful connections we make with the people around us. Yes, it's sometimes rather bleak and dark, but it's also breathtakingly honest. And the film is packed with staggeringly clever touches that touch on ideas in ways that cut right through to our hearts (we'll never year Girls Just Wanna Have Fun in quite the same way again). Aside from Michael and Lisa, all of the characters are voiced by Tom Noonan, a stylistic flourish that feels gimmicky until its meaning becomes clear. As played out by these delicately crafted puppets on remarkably detailed sets, the film looks simply astonishing. It's almost hyper-realistic, with characters who are packed with visible quirks that echo in the actors' vocal performances.

Continue reading: Anomalisa Review

Simon McBurney and David Thewlis - A host of stars were photographed on the red carpet as they arrived at the 21st Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards which were held at the Shrine auditorium in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 25th January 2015

Simon Mcburney and David Thewlis
Simon Mcburney and David Thewlis
Simon Mcburney and David Thewlis

See Eddie Reymane As Stephen Hawking In 'The Theory Of Everything' Trailer


Eddie Redmayne Felicity Jones James Marsh Emily Watson David Thewlis

Excitement for the forthcoming British biopic, The Theory of Everything, based on the life of cosmologist and theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking has been propelled forward twice this week: firstly with a still of the two main characters, Hawking and his wife Jane, and now with a full trailer.

The Theory of Everything
The first still released from the Stephen Hawking forthcoming biopic, The Theory of Everything

Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones assume the roles of the two main characters and will take audiences on a journey through the early stages of Hawking’s studies and the difficulties the couple face when he is diagnosed with motor neurone disease at the age of 21.

Continue reading: See Eddie Reymane As Stephen Hawking In 'The Theory Of Everything' Trailer

A Week In Movies: Gibson's Major Award, Special Screenings In New York, Set Photos From London And Three Big Trailers


Mel Gibson Andy Serkis Keri Russell Daniel Radcliffe Tom Hardy Christopher Eccleston David Thewlis Ben Affleck Steve Carell

Mel Gibson

This is a week when most attention was on the sporting world, with the Wimbledon finals, the Formula One British Grand Prix and the Tour de France starting in Britain, and of course the World Cup in Brazil. So most people didn't notice that the Karlovy Vary Film Festival kicked off in the Czech Republic by awarding Mel Gibson with the Crystal Globe for outstanding artistic contribution to world cinema. The festival wraps up on Saturday. Here's Mel Gibson at the 49th Karlovy Vary International Film Festival - Mad Max screening .

Meanwhile in New York, the stars turned out on Tuesday for the premiere of Dawn of the Planet of the Apes. Cast members Andy Serkis and Keri Russell were joined by visiting filmmakers Darren Aronofsky and Paul Haggis and actors Alex Karpovsky and Bridget Moynahan. The film opens this week in the US and next week in the UK. Here's a Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes clip to get you in the mood.

Continue reading: A Week In Movies: Gibson's Major Award, Special Screenings In New York, Set Photos From London And Three Big Trailers

The Fifth Estate Trailer


When Julian Assange began to leak damaging governmental information online through WikiLeaks, he was praised as a hero by many for finally showing the truth about unethical military operations such as the famous 'collateral murder' video showing an AH-64 Apache taking aim at some unarmed Iraqi journalists. One supporter, Daniel Domscheit-Berg, became good friends with Julian and eventually worked with him in his truth and justice exploits. However, when hundreds of names of government informers were under threat of being leaked, the pair were at a conflict as Daniel understood that many people's lives were at risk if the information got out while Julian remained determined to enlighten the public.

Continue: The Fifth Estate Trailer

Red 2 Trailer


Following the perilous events of the first movie, former CIA agent Frank Moses tries yet again to retire quietly with his young partner Sarah. However, he is soon chased down by his paranoid buddy Marvin Boggs who isn't taking to retirement as well as Frank is and is determined to set out on a new mission; to find a nuclear device that is being hunted by a group government officials, terrorists and brutal assassins. Meanwhile, the aging MI6 agent Victoria is mildly curious to learn that she has been contracted to hunt and kill Frank despite the pair being friends. 'Red 2' is set to be full of more death-defying adventures, dry humour and nigh on impossible missions as the Retired, Extremely Dangerous crew get together once more.

'Red 2' is the follow up from the 2010 movie directed by Robert Schwentke ('The Time Traveller's Wife') and based on the graphic novel mini-series created by Warren Ellis and Cully Hamner on DC Comics' Homage. This time we have an all new director, Oscar winner Dean Parisot ('Galaxy Quest', 'Fun with Dick and Jane'), and two returns from screenwriters Jon Hoeber and Erich Hoeber ('Battleship', 'Whiteout'). It's an action comedy due for release in the UK on August 2nd 2013.

Director: Dean Parisot

Continue: Red 2 Trailer

David Thewlis - David Thewlis and guests Saturday 31st March 2012 The worldwide Grand Opening event for the

David Thewlis
Guest and David Thewlis

The Lady Trailer


Aung San Suu Kyi, born in Burma, watched her father die when she was three years old. Her father had lead Burma into independence from the British empire in 1947, as well as founding the modern Burmese army. But in that same year, he was assassinated by his rivals.

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David Thewlis and Odeon Leicester Square Sunday 8th January 2012 War Horse - UK film premiere held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals. London, England

David Thewlis and Odeon Leicester Square
David Thewlis and Odeon Leicester Square

War Horse Review


Very Good
Spielberg takes the hit stage play (based on the Michael Morpugo novel) to the big screen with guns blazing, not only recapturing the heart-stopping urgency of war, but also cranking up the emotion exponentially.

In early 1900s Devon, teenager Albert (Irvine) lives on a farm with his impulsive-drunk father Ted (Mullan) and his tough-minded mum Rose (Watson).

When Ted overpays for the wrong horse to work the fields, Albert adopts the horse, names him Joey and teaches him the ropes. But when war breaks out in Europe, Ted sells Joey to a cavalry captain (Hiddleston). At war, Joey changes hands between British and German officers, a young soldier (Kross) and a French farmer (Arestrup). Meanwhile, Albert joins the army, heading into the trenches to search for Joey.

Continue reading: War Horse Review

The Lady Review


Very Good
The inspirational story of Aung San Suu Kyi comes to the big screen in the unlikely hands of Luc Besson, better known for mindless action like Taken and The Transporter. This is an emotionally involving film, with terrific central performances.

As daughter of Aung San, founder of independent Burma, Suu (Yeoh) has a place in her nation's heart. She lives in Britain with her Oxford-professor husband Michael (Thewlis) and their sons (Raggett and Woodhouse), and when she returns home to care for her ailing mother, she gets involved in the pro-democracy movement. This terrifies the military junta that rules with an iron fist, so they put her under house arrest just before the 1990 election that her party won in a landslide. Then the military refuses to cede power.

Continue reading: The Lady Review

David Thewlis - David Thewlis, New York City, USA - at the World Premiere of 'War Horse' at Avery Fisher Hall in the Lincoln Center for The Performing Arts. Sunday 4th December 2011

David Thewlis

David Thewlis and Grauman's Chinese Theatre Friday 4th November 2011 AFI Fest 2011 Premiere Of The Lady Hollywood, California

David Thewlis and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
David Thewlis and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
David Thewlis, Luc Besson, Michelle Yeoh and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
Michelle Yeoh, David Thewlis and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
David Thewlis and Grauman's Chinese Theatre
Luc Besson, David Thewlis, Michelle Yeoh and Grauman's Chinese Theatre

David Thewlis - Actor David Thewlis Rome, Italy - 6th International Rome Film Festival - 'The Lady' - Photocall Thursday 27th October 2011

David Thewlis
David Thewlis
David Thewlis

Anonymous Review


OK
Based on the long-mooted Oxfordian theory about the true authorship of Shakespeare's plays and poems, this film undermines its own point by over-egging the story. An over-complicated script and arch performances don't help the case.

In 16th century London Edward (Ifans), Earl of Oxford, has a passion for writing, which is forbidden by the puritan leaders of the day. So he passes his anonymous work to playwright Ben Jonson (Armesto), who allows actor William Shakespeare (Spall) to take the credit. Edward's life is inextricably linked with Queen Elizabeth (Redgrave): they were lovers several years ago (played by Bower and Richardson), and the political fallout is still being controlled by William Cecil (Thewlis) and his son Robert (Hogg).

Continue reading: Anonymous Review

David Thewlis and Empire Leicester Square Tuesday 25th October 2011 David Thewlis at the premiere of Anonymous at BFI London Film Festival at Empire, Leicester Square, London, England

David Thewlis and Empire Leicester Square
David Thewlis and Empire Leicester Square
David Thewlis and Empire Leicester Square

Anonymous Trailer


Edward de Vere is the illegitimate child of Queen Elizabeth I, as well as the Earl of Oxford. In his youth, he wrote a play called A Midsummer Night's Dream but was forbidden from writing anymore from his family, as it was considered taboo.

Continue: Anonymous Trailer

David Thewlis Thursday 7th July 2011 Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows: Part 2 - World Film Premiere - Afterparty at Old Billingsgate Market London, England

David Thewlis
David Thewlis
David Thewlis
David Thewlis
David Thewlis
David Thewlis

David Thewlis - David Thewlis, London, England - Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows: Part 2 - world film premiere held on Trafalgar Square - Arrivals. Thursday 7th July 2011

David Thewlis
David Thewlis
David Thewlis

War Horse Trailer


In rural England during the First World War, a horse named Joey befriends a young boy called Albert. One day Joey is sold to the cavalry and sent to the trenches in France, seeing firsthand the horrors of the Great War, yet touching the hearts of everyone he meets, including a French farmer, a German soldier and the British army. Although too young to enlist, 16 year old Albert joins the army and heads to France to find his friend.

Continue: War Horse Trailer

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - Part 2 Trailer


Harry Potter and his friends, Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger, continue their search for Voldemort's Horcruxes - dark magical objects that help the user gain immortality. Having found and destroyed one Horcrux - a locket belonging to Hogwarts founder Salazar Slytherin - the three friends travel from Ron's older brother Bill Weasley's house by the sea to the wizarding bank, Gringotts and then to Hogwarts to look for the final remaining Horcruxes.

Continue: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - Part 2 Trailer

David Thewlis - David Thewlis, London, England - at the London Evening Standard British Film Awards 2011 at the Marriot Hotel - Arrivals Monday 7th February 2011

David Thewlis

Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Review


Excellent

Cranking up the action and emotion, JK Rowling's Harry Potter saga moves into the first half of its extended grand finale. It's a relatively harrowing film punctuated by real violence, and it cleverly starts weaving together both the plot and the relationships.

After the tragic events of the previous school year, Harry (Radcliffe) and his pals Ron and Hermoine (Grint and Watson) know that they can't go back to normal. Instead, they're on the run from Voldemort (Fiennes) and his fearsome Death Eaters. They also have an overwhelming task: collecting the horcruxes that Voldemort has hidden to ensure his immortality. But where to look? And when they find one, how do they destroy it? Then a rebel journalist (Ifans) tells them the story of the Deathly Hallows, which makes their quest even more urgent.

The plot has a very different structure, as our three heroes are propelled by startling events into increasingly uncertain situations. Persistently chased by the bad guys and unable to trust anyone, they are profoundly alone and constantly in danger. We strongly feel their lonely desperation all the way through the film, so when another nasty thing happens to push them further along, it's genuinely unsettling.

Although it feels far too long, Yates and Kloves thankfully mix the dark drama with lighter comedy, allowing the characters to grow organically. Over seven films the story has grown increasingly gloomy but, despite the relentless anxiety, this chapter has an insistent pace, which is helpful since pretty nightmarish things are happening. There's also some subtext in the political storyline, as the villains seize control first of the media and then the government.

By now, the three central actors have settled solidly into their roles, adding subtle edges in every scene. Intriguingly, Grint has emerged as the most complex performer, but all three are excellent. And the who's who of British acting talent around them is fantastic. Stand-outs this time are Nighy (as a slippery politician), Isaacs (as a disgraced baddie) and Mullan (as a vicious security guy). But several others get a chance to shine as well, and of course there's a lot more action to come in Part 2.

Mr Nice Review


Excellent
The life of notorious drug smuggler Howard Marks hits the big screen in a lively, fiercely well-made biopic that never condemns drugs as its story spirals through the decades. It also features Ifans' best-ever performance.

Born in a rugby-mad Welsh mining town, Howard Marks (Ifans) knew he didn't fit in and proved it by getting into Oxford against the odds. There he immediately falls into the early-1960s brainy/druggy crowd, dealing marijuana but never anything harder. Despite efforts to go straight, he continually returns to trafficking, arguing that it's not a crime to break an immoral law. But his associations with a notorious IRA terrorist (Thewlis) and a rule-bending Indian businessman (Djalili) attract the attentions of a tenacious American agent (Tosar).

Continue reading: Mr Nice Review

David Thewlis Monday 4th October 2010 The UK film premiere of 'Mr Nice', held at the Cineworld Cinemas, Haymarket. London, England

David Thewlis
David Thewlis
David Thewlis
David Thewlis
David Thewlis

Mr. Nice Trailer


In the 1970's Howard Marks was one of the biggest weed smugglers in the world but the Welshman from the small town of Kenfig never indented to become such a major player in the industry. In the beginning Marks started out as a relatively minor drug dealer, supplying small amounts of dope but as his connections began to grow more opportunities became available.

Continue: Mr. Nice Trailer

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Part 1) Trailer


The final instalment of the Harry Potter series is almost upon us! Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows will bring the much loved set of films to a close.

Continue: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Part 1) Trailer

David Thewlis and Howard Marks - David Thewlis, Bernard Rose, Howard Marks and Rhys Ifans Edinburgh, Scotland - Edinburgh International Film Festival - 'Mr Nice' premiere Tuesday 22nd June 2010

David Thewlis and Howard Marks
Rhys Ifans and David Thewlis
David Thewlis
David Thewlis and Howard Marks
Rhys Ifans and David Thewlis
David Thewlis

David Thewlis Tuesday 29th September 2009 Celebrities arrive at the Breakfast at Tiffany's press night held at The Theatre Royal Haymarket London, England

David Thewlis
David Thewlis

Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince Review


Very Good
Darker and a whole lot drearier, this sixth Harry Potter adventure centres on a slow-developing mystery, and the filmmakers clearly struggle to give it much pace. It's well-made and watchable, but feels like an intake of breath before the frantic finale.

After the horrific conclusion of their fifth year at Hogwarts, Harry (Radcliffe) has a solitary summer before being drafted by headmaster Dumbledore (Gambon) into the ongoing war between the wizarding forces of light and darkness. And as year six starts, Dumbledore assigns Harry to get some important information from new potions professor Slughorn (Broadbent) about the Dark Lord's background. He of course does this with the help of pals Ron and Hermione (Grint and Watson), who with Harry are also caught up in conflict more typical for 17-year-olds: raging hormones.

Continue reading: Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince Review

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince - Trailer & Featurette


Watch the trailer for Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

Continue: Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince - Trailer & Featurette

David Thewlis and Anna Friel - David Thewlis and Anna Friel Los Angeles, California - Champagne Launch of BritWeek 2009 at the Consul General's Official Residence Thursday 23rd April 2009

David Thewlis and Anna Friel
David Thewlis

David Thewlis - David Thewlis, Anna Friel Monday 20th April 2009 at Paramount Studios Los Angeles, California

David Thewlis
David Thewlis

The Boy In The Striped Pajamas Review


Very Good
In Mark Herman's adaptation of John Boyne's controversial children's bestseller offering a kid's-eye view of Holocaust, the young eight-year-old Bruno (Asa Butterfield) has the wide, blue-eyed innocence of the unprotected. Sheltered and half in a fantasy world, he runs through city streets with his friends, his arms outstretched like wings, gliding untouched through the busy and congested world of adults. Herman bathes these opening scenes in a fantastic fairy-tale burnish, like a golden world ready to be lost.

Bruno shares a family dinner with his loving parents (Vera Farmiga and David Thewlis) and his older sister Gretel (Amber Beattie). With their sparkling British Masterpiece Theatre accents, the family appears as well-scrubbed paragons of British banality. (Even Richard Johnson, that great bastion of British nobility from the epics of the 1960s, is exhumed to appear as the family's Grandpa.) So it comes as a shock when Thewlis dons a German commandant's uniform for a going-away party and Herman quietly reveals that the Dad has been reassigned, taking the family with him. As Dad remarks, "Home is where the family is." In this case, however, home is Auschwitz and Dad is the new camp commandant, who will be supervising the mass exterminations.

Continue reading: The Boy In The Striped Pajamas Review

The Inner Life Of Martin Frost Review


Good
The work of Paul Auster can be an acquired taste, but his Inner Life of Martin Frost is so sweet and harmless that even the most jaded of moviegoers ought to find it a breezy way to spend 90 minutes, lost in Auster's weird fantasy land.

Martin Frost (David Thewlis) is a novelist, and he's off to the country for a vacation after finishing his latest book and to work on a new story. No sooner does he fall asleep, though, that he wakes up to find someone else in his bed, Claire Martin (Irène Jacob), who initially says she was lent the house by the same guy who lent it to Martin. Funny coincidence, eh? Just like their names: His first is Martin, her last is Martin. It helps that she's a hot, exotic French beauty with an active libido, and soon she's got her top off as they roll around in the sheets.

Continue reading: The Inner Life Of Martin Frost Review

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Trailer


Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
Trailer

Continue: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Trailer

Whatever Happened To Harold Smith? Review


Very Good
This strange and compelling Brit-flick has two disparate tales that surprisingly intersect when the father (Harold Smith) of one boy manages to stop the pacemakers of three elderly audience members during his attempt at mentally stopping the watches in the crowd. Whoops. In his defense is a scientist he refutes such mental powers, and his daughter and the Smith boy turn out to be semi-secret lovers. Well-acted and full of droll humor, and worth a look if you can find it for rent or on cable. Unfortunately, it has perhaps the worst movie title I've ever heard (and it makes me not want to see it again, just thinking about that title!)... except, of course, for this movie.

The Omen (2006) Review


Very Good
My favorite character in John Moore's remake of The Omen is the Pope. I am not entirely sure which Pope it is, and it is more of a cameo role really, but every time the pontiff graced the screen, I knew why I liked this film so much. He first features in a brief conference scene. His cardinals (I presume) are concerned that a recent meteor shower is the final sign of the birth of the Anti-Christ, as predicted by the book of Revelations. These concerns are presented to the Pope in a multimedia display, with numerous screens airing a student film depicting scenes from the destruction of the Space Shuttle Columbia to September 11. In his second appearance, after hearing some disturbing news, the Pope drops his glass of red on the floor, while still in bed. I have never been to Vatican City, but I doubt this is how things go down. Yet, the film's disconnectedness from the laws of reality, personified here by its treatment of the leader of the Catholic Church, got me. Richard Donner's original Omen was a pig in a cocktail dress, a silly story treated with undeserving earnestness. Here, John Moore tells it like it should be told.Turns out the cardinals were on to something and the Anti-Christ is born. The unfortunate Anti-Joseph and Anti-Mary are Robert and Katherine Thorn (Liev Schreiber and Julia Stiles), the deputy to the U.S. ambassador to Italy and his young wife. When Katherine gives birth to a boy who dies just outside the hospital room, Robert accepts the offer of a priest at the hospital, taking in the child's place a baby boy whose mother died during labor and letting Katherine believe it is theirs. They name him Damien (cue choirs). After a bizarre explosion (so massive in scale it proves the devil doesn't pay for petrol) in which the U.S. ambassador dies, Robert takes the position and a promotion to the U.K. The family lives in British manor house bliss until, at a very public birthday for Damien (Seamus Davey-Fitzpatrick), his nanny hangs herself, shrieking, "It's all for you!" From that moment forward the dangers of raising the Anti-Christ begin to become obvious. The black dogs begin to bark, monkeys screech, priests prophesize and a very un-Doubtfire-like nanny, Mrs Baylock (Mia Farrow), shows up to keep an eye on things.Moore doesn't stray widely from the path of the original's narrative and most changes made are welcome. I liked seeing a bit of determination in Damien's face. I liked that Katherine was young and seemed to be suffering post-partum depression. A lot of the dialogue is admittedly laughable, and Pete Postlethwaite and Michael Gambon as over-caffeinated priests add to a sense of the ludicrous. However, this only compounds its The Omen's minor brilliance. Everything is overdone: Damien sleeps on red silk sheets; people at the party start running and knocking over tables when the nanny kills herself; an interview with an old crippled man is conducted outside in the snow. The horror scenes are equally flamboyant; Marco Beltrami's score may lack the original's Latinized theme, but it kicks in to stunning and loud effect practically every time the lights go out.Schreiber is good as the politician and after a shaky start Stiles communicates her anguish very well. But it is Farrow (next to the Pope, of course) who steals the show. Her Mary Poppins performance oozes subtle menace in every sweet grin and glittery eye. When she unleashes eventually, it provides for the film's most exciting sequence - if you have dreamed for the day Rosemary would take on the Manchurian Candidate, dream no more. Though some critics might begrudge the film its directness, its loudness, perhaps its lack of class or cinematic restraint, I reveled in it. The story of Damien has always seemed a little stupid to me, and here Moore has matched the story with its telling. The result is fun, in a scary/jokey kind of way. I am not sure if John Moore is in on the joke he's telling in his remake of The Omen, but he tells it very well.If only she could do one pull-up.

Basic Instinct 2 Review


Bad

Paul Verhoeven, director of the original Basic Instinct, must be great in bed. The women in his films attest to this assumption. They don't just make love - they soar athletically about bedrooms and swimming pools. They don't simply orgasm - they erupt, cascade and convulse. Who can forget the otherwise forgettable Elizabeth Berkeley's rodeo pool ride atop the bucking and bullish Kyle Maclachlan in Verhoeven's surrealistically brilliant Showgirls? And no man could etch from his memory the opening of the original Basic Instinct - where a woman reaches such a state of thrill in conjugation that with her climax comes the crushing force of an ice pick into her partner's chest. Quite a release! If art imitates life and artists draw from experience, Verhoeven clearly has another skill set somewhat more impressive than his directorial abilities. Verhoeven's energy, his thrust if you will, informs Basic Instinct 2, a sequel he wisely chose to avoid.

In the tradition of hyperbolic orgasms, the opening of Basic Instinct 2 finds us in a car with Catherine Tramell (Sharon Stone) pleasuring herself with the hand of a drugged passenger while speeding through the streets of central London. Howling to her peak, Tramell drives the car through a roadblock and into the Thames. She survives. Her passenger does not. The accident and its involvement with popular author Tramell becomes a sensation and a mystery to the bottom of which detective Washburn (David Thewlis), a hard-worn London cop, seems unusually desperate to get. Tramell, in the course of the investigation, is sent to visit Dr. Michael Glass (David Morrissey) in order to undergo a psychiatric evaluation. As those viewers of the first film know, an interview with Tramell is no tame affair; an immediate attraction grows between doctor and patient that will end inevitably in blood, tears, and plenty of the good stuff that defined Verhoeven's earlier film.

Continue reading: Basic Instinct 2 Review

Restoration Review


Good
Robert Downey's schizophrenic personality has finally found a home in Restoration. This sweeping film, set in 1660 England during the reign of the flamboyant Charles II (Sam Neill), tells the story of Merivel (Downey), who rides a rollercoaster from volunteer surgeon to King's veterinarian, to his fall from grace and his eventual rebirth.

Merivel, the kind of guy who pawns his medical instruments to buy time with prostitutes, starts out as a pretty loathsome chap. However, he's also a pretty talented (and daring) physician, and after healing the King's beloved spaniel, he is brought into the fold of nobility. But the story then takes an inexplicable turn as Merivel is given a knighthood and coerced to marry the King's mistress, Celia (Polly Walker), and then promptly falls in love with her.

Continue reading: Restoration Review

Gangster No. 1 Review


OK
Sometimes, a film just goes beyond its means. Gangster No. 1 is just such a film. With a lukewarm gangster drama script, over-the-top performances from such actors as David Thewlis, Malcolm McDowell, and Paul Bettany, and Paul McGuigan's (The Acid House) exaggerated directing style, it just falls apart like Jell-O left in the sun.

Gangster No. 1 feels like pieces a bunch of other, better movies slapped together -- GoodFellas' musical selections, the violence from American Psycho and Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer, a dash of any Quentin Tarantino or Guy Ritchie style of editing, Malcolm McDowell in a performance recalling A Clockwork Orange. Some of it's fun, but it just isn't original or creative.

Continue reading: Gangster No. 1 Review

Kingdom Of Heaven Review


Weak

For almost five years now, Hollywood studios have beentrying to duplicate the success of "Gladiator"by making the same big-budget historical battle epic over ("TheLast Samurai") and over ("Troy")and over ("KingArthur") and over ("Alexander").

Each movie has re-imagined history from a modern, let's-keep-an-open-mindperspective and hewed to a shopworn formula in which the hero rallies hismen against great odds and for a greater good. He invariably leads theminto the same blood-and-mud war scenes, which are always shot in the samestaccato slow-motion that characterizes the chaos of combat but forgetsthe audience needs to be kept abreast of who is winning. The hero alsoalways finds time to romance a beautiful woman from another culture.

Aside from having different casts, the only significantvariations between these films seem to be 1) whether the hero was of noblebirth or came up from nothing to become a great leader, and 2) whetherthe battlefields are green and forested or brown and sandy. One thing mostof them definitely have in common is that they've bombed at the box office.

Continue reading: Kingdom Of Heaven Review

Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban Review


Very Good

Harry Potter is growing up, and so is his movie franchise.Under the tutelage of a new director -- Alfonso Cuarón, known for both children's fare (the 1995 remake of "A Little Princess") and an edgy, insightfully soulful, sex-charged teen road-trip flick ("Y Tu Mama, Tambien") -- the boy wizard has graduated from the world of kiddie movie spectacles with tie-in toys.

"Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban" is a film in which depth of character, cunning humor and hair-raising chills come shining through the visual blitzkrieg of special effects -- which are also magnificently improved over the series first two installments. Case in point: a half-horse, half-eagle creature called a Hippogriff that gives "Lord of the Rings'" Gollum a run for his money as the most life-like CGI creation in cinema history.

Beyond just its detailed feathers (which fluff when it shakes) or its golden eyes (which bore holes in the screen with obstinate personality), this winged equine's every movement, from its canter to its peck, is a studied yet natural, amazingly fluid amalgam of the two beasts that were combined to create it.

Continue reading: Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban Review

David Thewlis

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David Thewlis

Date of birth

20th March, 1963

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.89


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David Thewlis Movies

The Mercy Trailer

The Mercy Trailer

Donald Crowhurst is an amateur sailor whose ambition eclipses his financial woes. When he comes...

Wonder Woman Movie Review

Wonder Woman Movie Review

Boldly optimistic, this action-packed adventure breathes fresh life into the DC universe with a welcome...

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Wonder Woman Trailer

Wonder Woman Trailer

Diana Prince is one of the Amazon warriors of Themyscira, a tribe of women with...

Wonder Woman Trailer

Wonder Woman Trailer

Diana is a princess and one of the best fighters on the island she was...

The Conjuring 2 Trailer

The Conjuring 2 Trailer

Not fazed by their previous experiences, Lorraine and Ed Warren are still successful paranormal investigators...

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Anomalisa Movie Review

Anomalisa Movie Review

As he did in films like Being John Malkovich and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless...

Anomalisa Trailer

Anomalisa Trailer

Anomalisa is a new film from directors Charlie Kaufman and Duke Johnson. Kaufman (Eternal Sunshine...

Macbeth Movie Review

Macbeth Movie Review

Shakespeare's Scottish play returns to the big screen with earthy energy, visual style and roaring...

Legend Movie Review

Legend Movie Review

Written and directed with a rakish swagger, and featuring two full-on performances from Tom Hardy,...

Queen And Country Trailer

Queen And Country Trailer

Basic training for the Korean War is tough on a group of young British cadets....

Macbeth - Clips Trailer

Macbeth - Clips Trailer

Macbeth is a Scottish Duke who is greeted by three witches following a victorious battle....

Macbeth - Teaser Trailer

Macbeth - Teaser Trailer

After a long, hard battle, a Scottish Thane learns of a prophesy that will change...

Legend - First Look Trailer

Legend - First Look Trailer

Throughout the 1950s and 1960s, London was at the mercy of the terrifying Kray twins...

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