David Suchet

David Suchet

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Richard Attenborough Memorial

David Suchet - Richard Attenborough memorial service held at Westminster Abbey - Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 17th March 2015

David Suchet
David Suchet

Memorial service for Lord Richard Attenborough at Westminster Abbey

David Suchet - Memorial service for Lord Richard Attenborough at Westminster Abbey - Arrivals at Westminster Abbey - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 17th March 2015

David Suchet

'The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel' Premiere

Sheila Ferris and David Suchet - 'The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel' Premiere - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 17th February 2015

Premiere of 'The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel'

David Suchet - A host of stars were photographed as they attended the UK premiere of 'The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel' which was held at the Odeon Leicester Square in London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 17th February 2015

David Suchet
David Suchet and partner?
David Suchet and partner?

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel - Premiere

David Suchet and Guest - A host of stars were photographed as they attended the UK premiere of 'The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel' which was held at the Odeon Leicester Square in London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 17th February 2015

David Suchet

Effie Gray: Does It Take Victorian Repression Too Far?


Dakota Fanning Emma Thompson Tom Sturridge David Suchet Greg Wise Robbie Coltrane Derek Jacobi

Critics have been divided about the latest British period drama to hit cinemas. Effie Gray is based on a notorious true scandal from the mid-19th century, and most reviews have commented that the buttoned-up approach leaves the film feeling more than a little dull.

'Effie Gray' poster
Dakota Fanning stars in 'Effie Gray'

Indeed, for a film about a torrid love triangle, the movie only barely hints that there's any sex going on beyond lots of aching glances. Director Richard Laxton was clearly channelling Victorian timidity about these things, but there are spicier hints laced through Emma Thompson's script and the layered performances of the strong cast, including Dakota Fanning, Greg Wise, Tom Sturridge, Julie Walters, David Suchet, Derek Jacobi and Thompson herself.

Continue reading: Effie Gray: Does It Take Victorian Repression Too Far?

Effie Gray Review


Good

Based on a notorious true story, this film takes a muted approach that matches the Victorian period and attitudes, which somewhat undermines the vivid emotions of the characters. It's a fascinating story about a woman caught in her society's harshly restrictive rules about women, and the script by Emma Thompson captures some strong observations, interaction and personal feelings, but the film is so dark and repressed that it ultimately feels a bit dull.

In the mid 19th century, Effie Gray (Dakota Fanning) has been courted by noted art critic John Ruskin (Greg Wise) since she was only 12 years old, and he has waited for her to come of age to marry her. But as she moves in with his suffocating parents (Julie Walters and David Suchet) in London, Effie soon realises that she's trapped in a hopeless situation. While he's loving, John simply refuses to touch her, which makes her doubt her own intellect and femininity. She's befriended by Lady Eastlake (Thompson), who knows a thing or two about cold marriages and helps her make a plan. Then Effie and John travel to Scotland with John's protege, the painter Everett Millais (Tom Sturridge), and Effie begins to understand that there might be other possibilities out there.

Since the film is made in Victorian style, it leaves all of the heaving passion far beneath the surface. It's obvious that Effie (and the audience) are craving a bit of lusty bodice-ripping, but any action remains behind closed doors, only hinted at in the clever dialogue. This makes the film realistic and intriguing, but difficult to get a grip on. And instead of the scandalous love triangle of historical record, the film plays out more as a drama about a young woman working out a complex escape from male-dominated society. Even so, it's a compelling journey, with some remarkable twists and turns along the way, and the complex characters add plenty of detail.

Continue reading: Effie Gray Review

Effie Gray Trailer


When young Effie Grey (Dakota Fanning) is married to John Ruskin (Greg Wise), a man ten years older than her, she feels no pleasure whatsoever. She is soon whisked away from her native Scotland and follows her husband as he travels to Venice in order to work on his book, 'The Stones of Venice'. People often notice that there is no love between the pair, and they drift apart during their time in Italy, with Effie spending her time walking the streets of Venice and spending more and more time with her husband's protégée John Everett Millais (Tom Sturridge). With the two steadily falling in love, the struggle between right and wrong rages within Effie, as she is forced to make the choice between what she is told, and what she wants. 

Continue: Effie Gray Trailer

David Suchet Waves Goodbye to Poirot After 25 Years of Solving Crimes


David Suchet

It’s not the hardened criminal thrillers we see on Sunday nights after 9pm, but Poirot’s murder mysteries have captivated audiences for a quarter of a century. Now, though, as David Suchet sees himself on the small screen as the Belgian detective for the last time, it’s time to wave goodbye to the character, having filmed every one of the books Agatha Christie wrote for him.

PoirotDavid Suhet as Poirot

"Crime drama… has changed completely… it's become very dark and extraordinarily violent," says Suchet to BBC News. "That's not the world of Agatha Christie and the fact that he's still so popular must say a lot about the public - that they actually don't need the blood and gore and the sex and the drama."

Continue reading: David Suchet Waves Goodbye to Poirot After 25 Years of Solving Crimes

David Suchet Had No Idea Poirot Would Change His Life So Profoundly


David Suchet

After a quarter of a decade as the moustachioed Belgian super sleuth Hercule Poirot, David Suchet will finally bid a fond farewell to the character that has defined his career as an actor. The Emmy and BAFTA award-winning actor will return to ITV as Poirot for one last time when he stars in the eagerly anticipated adaption of Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case.

Poirot
Suchet in his final incarnation as Poirot

The final Poirot tale written by Agatha Christie, Curtain is also Suchet's final bow as the famed detective and picks up with an aged and immobilised Poirot who comes out of retirement to return to the scene of his first case, Styles Court. With the help of his old friend Captain Hastings (Hugh Fraser) the frail Poirot may not be as spry as he once was, but his wits have not left him as he and Hastings team up once more to prevent an imminent murder.

Continue reading: David Suchet Had No Idea Poirot Would Change His Life So Profoundly

Last Ever Poirot Episode 'Curtain' Prepares To Air On ITV


David Suchet

David Suchet has played Agatha Christie's detective Hercule Poirot for 25 years but soon it will be finally time to walk away from the role after final episode 'Curtain.'

Poirot David Suchet
'Poirot' Fans Prepare To Bid Farewell To The Legendary Detective.

Suchet spoke of his upcoming departure but was careful not to give too much away. "Curtain will be a very emotional farewell to a character who has been a big part of my life and has become one of my very dearest best friends," he said. "Considering the outcome of the final film it would have been very difficult for me psychologically to leave Poirot in this way. He is a brilliant, yet profoundly complicated character and I've always enjoyed playing him."

Continue reading: Last Ever Poirot Episode 'Curtain' Prepares To Air On ITV

New Author To Bring Agatha Christie's Poirot Out Of Retirement


Agatha Christie David Suchet

Agatha Christie left us with some truly memorable characters in her time as a best-selling author, and no better example can be found than the Belgian super sleuth Hercule Poirot. Having been put to rest along with Christie and her other literary creations following her death in 1976, now, with the permission of the crime author's family, the detective is being brought out of retirement and brought back into the literary world.

Sophie Hannah, an experienced crime novelist and poet, has been put to work to write the first official Agatha Christie story since her death some decades ago. Christie's grandson, Mathew Prichard, was particularly keen to bring the Belgian detective back to life and gave full consent to Hannah to return Poirot - who is portrayed on screen by David Suchet - to his former glories. The reboot comes almost a century after the character was first introduced in 1920's The Mysterious Affair at Styles.

David Suchet
David Suchet plays Poirot on television

Continue reading: New Author To Bring Agatha Christie's Poirot Out Of Retirement

The Bank Job Review


Weak
Based on some unspeakable, super classified bank robbery that took place in 1971 London, the investigation of which yielded no recovered money nor any arrests, Roger Donaldson's The Bank Job throttles its engines and tosses in just enough criminal bottom-dwellers to keep the viewers' minds away from the fact that it's still just another heist flick with a cockney accent and a taste for pints.

Names changed (get this) to protect the guilty, the whole mess breaks out when political revolutionary Michael X (Peter De Jersey) snaps some shots of Princess Margaret getting double teamed by two young men on a secluded island. Michael, in fact a pimp and a gangster, places this get-out-of-jail-free card in a safety deposit box at Lloyd's Bank on Baker Street. Adjoining boxes hold more blackmail bait for a brothel Madame, consisting of pictures of government officials getting their spank on, and a ledger of corrupt cops kept by local hood Vogel (David Suchet).

Continue reading: The Bank Job Review

The In-Laws (2003) Review


Excellent
Has Michael Douglas found The Fountain of Youth in Catherine Zeta-Jones? Since the Gordon Gekko days of Wall Street fame, his body is certainly a little less nimble, his face a little more wrinkled, and his hair a shade too light. But the guy looks great, and he's once again an action hero. That bumps him up from "silver spoon" to "ageless wonder" in the Hollywood classification book - ever closer to the royalty of perennial good lookers Redford and Basinger.

In The In-Laws (based on the 1979 film of the same name), like most other Michael Douglas vehicles, his gaunt face is rarely off the camera. Wisely, director Andrew Fleming inserts a hilarious Albert Brooks as the perfect remedy for Douglas's self-absorption.

Continue reading: The In-Laws (2003) Review

The Falcon and the Snowman Review


Excellent
Underseen (and true) spy drama set in the early 1970s, The Falcon and the Snowman tells the perplexing tale of Christopher Boyce (Hutton), a low-level document controller who filtered reams of material to the Soviet Union. His mistake? Using his coked-up drug pusher buddy (Penn) as his bagman. As Penn's character falls apart, so does the plan. And in a way, so does the film. While most of Falcon is great, some of it drags and doesn't make sense. Still, you do get to hear a bit about Boyce's motivation: His conscience, which told him to expose the CIA for some of its more nefarious and off-topic activities. A good companion piece to better-known thrillers of the era like All the President's Men.
David Suchet

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