David Soul

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Filth - Red Band Trailer


This trailer is only suitable for persons aged 18 or over.

Bruce Robertson is a vile, devious and emotionally disturbed individual who also happens to be a Detective Sergeant. Off duty, he lives a life of debauchery; snorting line after line of cocaine and indulging in sordid sexual encounters with numerous women while trying to control his unpredictable bipolar personality. On duty, he does everything within his power to trick, deceive and ruin the lives of his colleagues with whom he competes to achieve a promotion to detective inspector. He does nothing to hide his radical views on race and women as he attempts to solve a grisly murder that seems to have more to it than he initially thought. With the web of lies he weaves throughout his life, will he be able to sort out truths from the untruths in order to maintain his sanity as his deteriorating mental health threatens to cripple him? And will he ever be reunited with the wife he is so desperate to resolve things with?

Adapted from the novel by Irvine Welsh, 'Filth' has been directed and written by Jon S. Baird ('Cass') and sees an intense star-studded cast convert to screen an compelling story of insanity, romance and deceit. This shocking 18-rated crime drama is set to hit UK cinemas in September 2013.

Picture - David Soul , Monday 18th June 2012

David Soul Monday 18th June 2012 Jerry Hall and David Soul launch 'Love Letters' at The Gaiety Theatre which opens tonight

Picture - Jerry Hall and David Soul , Monday 18th June 2012

Jerry Hall and David Soul - Jerry Hall and David Soul Monday 18th June 2012 Jerry Hall and David Soul launch 'Love Letters' at The Gaiety Theatre which opens tonight

Jerry Hall and David Soul
Jerry Hall and David Soul
Jerry Hall and David Soul
Jerry Hall and David Soul
Jerry Hall and David Soul

Magnum Force Review


OK
The first sequel to Dirty Harry proved a mildly entertaining winner, as vigilantes start offing the unconvicted mobsters of San Francisco. Harry himself isn't much more ethical, creating a moral dilemma... yeah, right! Mindless shooting and car chasing follows, along with the most-ever shots of the Golden Gate Bridge on film. Note that the cinematography is particularly awful in this movie -- most of which happens in the dark.

Starsky & Hutch Review


Terrible

Owen Wilson has a smarmy-cool, utterly natural screen persona of wicked, crooked smiles, cheeky ad-libs and ironically understated wisecracks. He never strays far from this trademarked character, but no matter who he's playing -- petty criminal ("The Big Bounce"), crooked cowboy ("Shanghai Noon"), severely dysfunctional pop novelist ("The Royal Tenenbaums") -- he seems like a guy it would be fun to hang out with.

Ben Stiller, on the other hand, has fallen into a terrible rut as an insufferable prat. Whether he's a caricature of a romantic failure ("Along Came Polly"), a caricature of a dim-bulb fashion model ("Zoolander") or a caricature of a nervous son-in-law ("Meet the Parents"), he never strays far from the same brand of off-putting, uptight dorkiness masked in mock-cool-guy pouts and tedious moments of deliberately cheesy slow-motion (say, while dancing like a dork, strutting like a dork or running like a dork). He seems like a guy you wouldn't want to spend two minutes with if you could at all help it.

Wilson has been a breath of scene-stealing fresh air in several Stiller vehicles (especially in "Zoolander" and "Meet the Parents"), but their yin-and-yang routine hits a wall in "Starsky and Hutch," a lifelessly stale parody-remake of the none-too-great-in-the-first-place 1970s cop show.

Continue reading: Starsky & Hutch Review

David Soul

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