David Ogden Stiers

David Ogden Stiers

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Picture - David Ogden Stiers New York City, USA, Thursday 19th November 2009

David Ogden Stiers Thursday 19th November 2009 Macy's Herald Square 'Holiday Window Unveiling and Celebration' New York City, USA

Picture - David Ogden Stiers, Madeleine Rose... New York City, USA, Friday 6th November 2009

David Ogden Stiers, Madeleine Rose Yen and Ruth Williamson - David Ogden Stiers, Madeleine Rose Yen and Ruth Williamson New York City, USA - A sneak peek of the 2009 Broadway cast of 'Irving Berlin's White Christmas' during an open rehearsal at the New 42nd Street Studios Friday 6th November 2009

David Ogden Stiers, Madeleine Rose Yen and Ruth Williamson

Picture - David Ogden Stiers New York City, USA, Friday 6th November 2009

David Ogden Stiers Friday 6th November 2009 A sneak peek of the 2009 Broadway cast of 'Irving Berlin's White Christmas' during an open rehearsal at the New 42nd Street Studios New York City, USA

Atlantis: The Lost Empire Review


Excellent
The song-and-dance numbers are out. The cheery sidekicks are nowhere to be seen. The predictable villains in black are nonexistent. This summer, Disney comes out with both guns blazing, literally, in its newest animated feature Atlantis: The Lost Empire, an imaginative and eye-popping mix of action, adventure, and sweeping vision landscapes filled with gorgeous computer enhanced animation.

Continuing on its recent arc of solid storylines in its animation and quality visuals, Atlantis is successful in both being a wide-eyed roller-coaster ride for kids and is interesting enough to keep adults from passing out from boredom. The film follows the adventures of Milo Thatch (Michael J. Fox), a bookworm/boiler room attendant/linguistics expert who probably hasn't had a date in years. Milo's grandfather was an explorer looking for Atlantis who knew where to discover the location of the lost city -- in a hidden journal. With the help of eccentric billionaire Preston Whitmore (John Mahoney), the lost journal is recovered, providing new clues to Atlantis's whereabouts. Milo then joins a group of rag-tag explorers -- including a 200-person Navy, enough surplus to take over a small county, and no cute sidekicks -- in the search for the city of Atlantis.

Continue reading: Atlantis: The Lost Empire Review

Lilo & Stitch Review


Terrible
There are three essential elements for a polished Disney animated film: rich and detailed animation, inspirational music that is catchy and clever, and a clear message that is easy to understand. Alas, Disney's latest, Lilo & Stitch, fails to live up to any of these.

Lilo & Stitch tells the story of two outcasts searching for a place to fit in. Lilo is a young Hawaiian girl who is shunned by her friends because she picks fights and plays unfairly. Her older sister, Nani, is raising her because their parents died in a car crash. The social worker assigned to their case has threatened to remove Lilo from Nani's care because she cannot control Lilo's poor behavior. It sounds like the prototypical dysfunctional American family - how un-Disney-like!

Continue reading: Lilo & Stitch Review

My Neighbors the Yamadas Review


Good
In the US, we embrace animated families steeped in enormous dysfunction--the Simpsons, Family Guy's Griffin clan, or the poor bastards on King of the Hill. The Japanese Yamadas, on the other hand, title characters in this unique collection of vignettes, have a more universal level of dysfunction. Their humor doesn't lean on huge levels of bumbling idiocy and resentment; instead, it is gentle and knowing, like the Japanese poetry that appears throughout My Neighbors the Yamadas.

The Yamadas are your basic suburban family weathering the storms that most families deal with. Because their issues have such a commonality, nearly everyone, regardless of age, will find something to connect with -- and chuckle at -- in this charming feature just released on DVD here in the States.

Continue reading: My Neighbors the Yamadas Review

The Hunchback of Notre Dame Review


Grim
Disney's animation studio just about hit rock bottom in 1996, following its worst film ever, Pocahontas, with another weak entry, a difficult adaptation of Victor Hugo's classic novel.

It's typical of 1990s Disney: unlikely hero (Tom Hulce, as Quisimodo), who falls for a ravishing beauty (Demi Moore, as a gypsy gal), while goofy sidekicks (three stone gargoyles) crack jokes. Every five minutes, someone bursts into song. And yet none of this is kid-friendly, and little of it will be of interest to adults.

Continue reading: The Hunchback of Notre Dame Review

Hoodwinked Review


OK
The creative team behind Hoodwinked received their diplomas from the Shrek school of satirical animation. Not that the ornery ogre's odyssey was the first feature to wed sarcasm to traditional storybook verses, but it did raise the bar against which all other animated adventures will be measured.

In updating the Little Red Riding Hood legend, writer/directors Cory Edwards, Tony Leech, and Todd Edwards found a fairy tale with ample room left to explore. We all know what happened when Red (Anne Hathaway) trekked through the forest to visit her grandma (Glenn Close). The big, bad wolf (Patrick Warburton) waited patiently under the sheets, barely masking a nose to smell with, those ears to hear with, and a set of choppers with which to eat.

Continue reading: Hoodwinked Review

Porco Rosso Review


Excellent
Even Hayao Miyazaki's biggest fans are unlikely to have seen Porco Rosso, one of his most delightful -- and socially important -- works.

Title character Porco Rosso is, well, a man with the head of a pig, the result of a curse placed on him in some unknown earlier era. In 1930s Italy, he works as a bounty hunter, living on a quiet island beach in a little tent. When the phone rings, he jumps in his red prop plane and heads off to save whoever's calling from pirates, keeping his cool (as voiced by Michael Keaton in the U.S. dub) all the while.

Continue reading: Porco Rosso Review

My Neighbors the Yamadas Review


Good
In the US, we embrace animated families steeped in enormous dysfunction--the Simpsons, Family Guy's Griffin clan, or the poor bastards on King of the Hill. The Japanese Yamadas, on the other hand, title characters in this unique collection of vignettes, have a more universal level of dysfunction. Their humor doesn't lean on huge levels of bumbling idiocy and resentment; instead, it is gentle and knowing, like the Japanese poetry that appears throughout My Neighbors the Yamadas.

The Yamadas are your basic suburban family weathering the storms that most families deal with. Because their issues have such a commonality, nearly everyone, regardless of age, will find something to connect with -- and chuckle at -- in this charming feature just released on DVD here in the States.

Continue reading: My Neighbors the Yamadas Review

The Curse of the Jade Scorpion Review


OK
The Curse of the Jade Scorpion takes Woody Allen to some truly unfamiliar territory: Manhattan! I mean, can you believe it? Woody Allen in New York? But seriously: At least this time out we're in 1940 NYC, his first real old-timey flick since 1994's Bullets Over Broadway.

It's also (thankfully) another entry in the Slapstick Woody genre (a la Small Time Crooks), who seems to be doing a good job at keeping Serious Woody out of the picture since the late 1980s. Whew!

Continue reading: The Curse of the Jade Scorpion Review

Beauty And The Beast (1991) Review


Good
Often considered the best animated film ever -- and the only one to ever be nominated for Best Picture -- on a return viewing ten years later, Beauty and the Beast doesn't seem to be quite the masterpiece we once thought.

Though it's still good, pop this Special Edition DVD into your player and you're instantly greeted with a crash of noise. Beauty lets you know right from the start that it is not a subtle film, full of bluster and fire and singing and talking everything. (And everything talking at the top of its lungs.)

Continue reading: Beauty And The Beast (1991) Review

Atlantis: The Lost Empire Review


Excellent
The song-and-dance numbers are out. The cheery sidekicks are nowhere to be seen. The predictable villains in black are nonexistent. This summer, Disney comes out with both guns blazing, literally, in its newest animated feature Atlantis: The Lost Empire, an imaginative and eye-popping mix of action, adventure, and sweeping vision landscapes filled with gorgeous computer enhanced animation.

Continuing on its recent arc of solid storylines in its animation and quality visuals, Atlantis is successful in both being a wide-eyed roller-coaster ride for kids and is interesting enough to keep adults from passing out from boredom. The film follows the adventures of Milo Thatch (Michael J. Fox), a bookworm/boiler room attendant/linguistics expert who probably hasn't had a date in years. Milo's grandfather was an explorer looking for Atlantis who knew where to discover the location of the lost city -- in a hidden journal. With the help of eccentric billionaire Preston Whitmore (John Mahoney), the lost journal is recovered, providing new clues to Atlantis's whereabouts. Milo then joins a group of rag-tag explorers -- including a 200-person Navy, enough surplus to take over a small county, and no cute sidekicks -- in the search for the city of Atlantis.

Continue reading: Atlantis: The Lost Empire Review

The Hunchback of Notre Dame Review


Grim
Disney's animation studio just about hit rock bottom in 1996, following its worst film ever, Pocahontas, with another weak entry, a difficult adaptation of Victor Hugo's classic novel.

It's typical of 1990s Disney: unlikely hero (Tom Hulce, as Quisimodo), who falls for a ravishing beauty (Demi Moore, as a gypsy gal), while goofy sidekicks (three stone gargoyles) crack jokes. Every five minutes, someone bursts into song. And yet none of this is kid-friendly, and little of it will be of interest to adults.

Continue reading: The Hunchback of Notre Dame Review

Lilo & Stitch Review


Terrible
There are three essential elements for a polished Disney animated film: rich and detailed animation, inspirational music that is catchy and clever, and a clear message that is easy to understand. Alas, Disney's latest, Lilo & Stitch, fails to live up to any of these.

Lilo & Stitch tells the story of two outcasts searching for a place to fit in. Lilo is a young Hawaiian girl who is shunned by her friends because she picks fights and plays unfairly. Her older sister, Nani, is raising her because their parents died in a car crash. The social worker assigned to their case has threatened to remove Lilo from Nani's care because she cannot control Lilo's poor behavior. It sounds like the prototypical dysfunctional American family - how un-Disney-like!

Continue reading: Lilo & Stitch Review

David Ogden Stiers

David Ogden Stiers Quick Links

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