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Concussion Trailer


Dr. Bennet Omalu is a pathologist who loves his job and, in many ways, the patients that he looks after. His methods are his own but they work for him and he's very successful at his job. When ex-American Football star Mike Webster turns up on his morticians table, Omalu treats his body just like he would any other. What isn't initially known to Omalu is that after years of playing professional football Webster had become something of a recluse whilst suffering with Dementia and depression.

Bennet's initial findings with the late Mr Webber is that he died of cardiac arrest, but unhappy with this conclusion, the pathologist begins to dig deeper. Looking at every possible outcome, Bennet beings to study the brain of the ex-footballer and what he discovers is a new disease that hasn't been seen before.

Before this point, people knew about a condition called Punch Drunk, a disorder often associated with contact sport such as boxing, but up until Dr. Bennet Omalu's discovery the disorder hadn't been seen as a physical effect.

Continue: Concussion Trailer

Horns - International Trailer


Following the vicious rape and murder of his girlfriend Merrin Williams, Ig Perrish goes on a grief-ridden binge and awakens the next morning with the mother of all hangovers. He also discovers two horn like growths pushing through his temples which appear to be growing larger. He visits a friend and shows her his new appendages, but to his surprise she seems untroubled by the unusual deformity - as do the reporters that Ig is struggling to shake off since being acquitted of Merrin's murder. More unusual still, he also finds that everyone is sharing their darkest secrets and desires with him, including his doctor who is also unfazed by his appearance. As he becomes used to the horns, Ig also discovers he has another ability - he has the power to control the actions of nearly everyone he comes into contact with.

Continue: Horns - International Trailer

Cory Monteith's Final Film Project, 'McCanick', To Premiere At Toronto Film Festival


Cory Monteith David Morse Mike Vogel Zoe Bell Glee Rachel Nichols Ciaran Hinds

Cory Monteith's final film McCanick is due to premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival on September 9th. In one of his final roles, Monteith plays Simon Weeks a drug addict and recently released prisoner. According to reports by MTV, Weeks is suspected of a murder he committed whilst in his teens, he is tracked down by two detectives: Eugene 'Mack' McCanick (David Morse) and Floyd Intrator (Mike Vogel).

Cory Monteith
Cory Monteith at the 2012 San Diego Comic-Con, appearing in the Glee press room.

The trailer suggests Monteith's character is likely innocent of the suspected crime. One character warns the irritable McCanick "he's done bad things but he is not a killer", whilst the detective retorts "you don't know him as well as you think." This could be a red herring in itself, but we shall have to wait and see!

Continue reading: Cory Monteith's Final Film Project, 'McCanick', To Premiere At Toronto Film Festival

David Morse - Meet and greet with the cast of "The Unavoidable Disappearance of Tom Durnin" held at Roundabout Theatre rehearsal space. - New York City, United States - Wednesday 8th May 2013

David Morse
David Morse and Christopher Denham
David Morse, Lisa Emery, Rich Sommer, Sarah Goldberg, Christopher Denham, Steven Levenson and Scott Ellis
David Morse and Rich Sommer
David Morse, Lisa Emery, Rich Sommer, Sarah Goldberg, Christopher Denham, Steven Levenson and Scott Ellis

David Morse - 28th Annual Lucille Lortel Awards - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Sunday 5th May 2013

David Morse

Brent Sexton, Alan Alda, Allison Janney, David Morse, Liev Schreiber and Maggie Gyllenhaal Wednesday 1st June 2011 Brent Sexton, Mireille Enos, David Morse, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Liev Schreiber, Allison Janney, Bill Camp and Alan Alda

Brent Sexton, Alan Alda, Allison Janney, David Morse, Liev Schreiber and Maggie Gyllenhaal
Brent Sexton, Alan Alda, Allison Janney, David Morse, Liev Schreiber and Maggie Gyllenhaal
Brent Sexton, Alan Alda, Allison Janney, David Morse, Liev Schreiber and Maggie Gyllenhaal
Brent Sexton, Alan Alda, Allison Janney, David Morse, Liev Schreiber and Maggie Gyllenhaal
Brent Sexton, Alan Alda, Allison Janney, David Morse, Liev Schreiber and Maggie Gyllenhaal
Brent Sexton

Drive Angry Trailer


Escaping the deepest and darkest realms of hell, Milton returns to Earth in a bid to save his baby grand daughter from death. Milton's daughter was murdered by a cult days earlier and now Milton has three days before the cult leader sacrifices the baby in an attempt to unleash hell on earth.

Continue: Drive Angry Trailer

Mother & Child Trailer


Adoption is a life changing situation for all involved.The woman who feels she must give up her baby must find a way of life after giving up her child, the adoptee ofter goes through months of unknowing before finally being given a new family member and the child often grows up feeling loved by their adoptive parents but wanting to discover more about their birth parents. Mother and Child is a moving tale of three women all in very different situations but all connected through a similar circumstance. Adoption.

Continue: Mother & Child Trailer

The Hurt Locker Review


Excellent
It's intriguing to watch a battlefield movie that manages to be gritty and harrowing as well as sensitive and moving, but that's what Bigelow has done.

This is a film that often makes us flinch from the screen, mainly because of a superbly layered performance by Renner.

In war-torn Baghdad, the American bomb disposal team uses dry humour to cope with their job. But the new senior officer, James (Renner), is rather enigmatic and strange. His teammates Sanborn and Eldridge (Mackie and Geraghty) find his maverick attitude difficult, leading to tense exchanges in extreme situations.

Continue reading: The Hurt Locker Review

Inside Moves Review


Bad
Director Richard Donner became a name by making big, action-packed blockbusters like Superman and the Lethal Weapon quartet. So watching Inside Moves, his 1980 character study about outcasts who find salvation in a watering hole, is mesmerizing for all the wrong reasons. It's like watching Michael Jordan missing a curveball by a country mile, Garth Brooks rocking out as Chris Gaines, or George W. Bush handling foreign policy.

The lead outcast here is Roary (John Savage), who attempts to end his life by jumping from a 10-story window. Through dumb luck he survives, but emerges months later from the hospital with a crippled leg and a broken spirit. Desperate for something to do, he heads over to the local bar, Max's, which looks like the kind of place that serves nothing but procrastination and broken dreams.

Continue reading: Inside Moves Review

John Adams Review


Excellent
The mammoth success of David McCullough's John Adams (2001) was one of publishing's great shockers. How could a lengthy hardcover about America's least glamorous founding father sell so many copies?

It wasn't the Pulitzer that moved units. It was McCullough's storytelling which transformed Adams' life from a forgotten textbook paragraph to something deserving of a big-budget, seven-part HBO epic.

Continue reading: John Adams Review

David Morse Saturday 29th December 2007 out and about New York City, USA

David Morse
David Morse
David Morse

David Morse Thursday 27th December 2007 Actor David Morse out and about in Midtown Manhattan New York City, USA

David Morse
David Morse
David Morse

Disturbia Review


Very Good
Disturbia is a critically vulnerable film at the outset. Its task is an audacious one: "YouTubing" Hitchcock. Who isn't disturbed by the prospect of D.J. Caruso (Taking Lives!) helming a Rear Window rip-off for the MySpace generation? In the role of Jimmy Stewart: The talented if somewhat untested Shia LeBeouf. Grace Kelly: Sarah Roemer, a bit player in the woeful The Grudge 2. Gulp. Instead of a telescope, we get about four sets of binoculars, video cameras, mobile phones, and some outrageously sophisticated computer surveillance equipment. Instead of the poignantly crafted Miss Lonelyheart and the frustrated composer of Hitchcock's film, the neighbourhood offers for our voyeuristic pleasures the bikini-clad girl next door and a group of prepubescents with a penchant for porn. There is so much wrong before the film has even begun.

The film's beginning will not allay your fears. Kale (LaBeouf) and his dad (Matt Craven) are fishing. Knee-deep in a lake and surrounded by mountains, they share a particularly cheesy father-son moment. We see that he's not just Kale's father, he is his friend. The relationship is so clichéd and the setting so cloyingly idyllic, that one wants to run for the (admittedly beautiful-looking) hills. However, before you go to switch off the Hallmark channel, Caruso offs the dad in a car accident just brutal enough to forgive what came before and dissolve some preconceptions. It's a pretty good move (although not quite Janet Leigh in the Bates Motel shower) and sets us up for a film that effectively handles and plays its audience.

Continue reading: Disturbia Review

The Green Mile Review


Excellent
The Green Mile? Let's talk about 26 miles. The length of a marathon. Start the race and the movie together: The race would long be over before the film. The winner would be at home, taking a nap. Yes, The Green Mile is three hours long.

Not that long movies have never been successful, and not that The Green Mile is bad. You might even think a long movie is required here. Pulled from Stephen King's acclaimed series of six books by the same name, King returns to the kind of work he was doing in The Shawshank Redemption (based on a short story of his), the kind that seems to perform the best, away from splatter and gore, and into the minds of the strangest of characters.

Continue reading: The Green Mile Review

Down In The Valley Review


Good

Harlan Carruthers is a blissful cowboy, all scuffed boots, aw-shucks mannerisms, and a negligent sort of sensuality. He's lightening-quick with his twin single-shot Colts and loves nothing more than riding his horse to the highest hill around and surveying the beauty of the landscape.

He's also a walking anachronism, because Down in the Valley is a modern-day tale, and the title refers to the overbuilt suburbia that is the San Fernando Valley, the land of crowded freeways and chain stores that marks the northern reaches of Los Angeles. But Harlan, played by Edward Norton, swaggers through, contentedly out of place, until he catches sight of Tobe (Evan Rachel Wood), a teenage nymph who pulls into the service station where Harlan works as she is on the way to the beach with her giggling friends. It's unclear why the group dismisses Harlan as out-of-place instead of in fashion, but Tobe is as instantly taken with him as he is with her, and he quits his job to catch his first sight of the ocean with her.

Continue reading: Down In The Valley Review

Dreamer: Inspired By A True Story Review


Good
Take Seabiscuit, remove the cussing, the drunkenness, the Depression, and all the death, and add in one prococious little blonde girl. You pretty much have Dreamer, a perfectly acceptable family film that, nonetheless, adds nothing to the genre.

Heck, if you throw in a zebra as well you have Racing Stripes, which came out a year earlier and told the same story: Girl adopts horse that no one believes in (in Dreamer it's a horse with a broken leg, not a zebra), who goes on to fame at the races. The film is based on a true story -- as the title probably clued you in -- about a horse named Mariah's Storm, a female who broke her leg and, after being completely written off, eventually returned to the track and earned hundreds of thousands of dollars. It's pretty much the same story here, though the horse is named Sonador (Spanish for "dreamer," if you add in a tilde), and genre-appropriate villains are written in to the tale.

Continue reading: Dreamer: Inspired By A True Story Review

16 Blocks Review


OK
It's just about eight in the morning, and the worst cop in the world needs a drink. Instead of a drink, the lieutenant gives him a job: at some point over the next 118 minutes, get this witness 16 blocks downtown to 100 Centre Street so he can give testimony before a grand jury. The witness is a talker, with a whiney voice; way too early for this. Traffic is bad, though, so the cop nips into a liquor store while they're on the way. While he's in the store, two hitmen try to kill the witness. Cop drops his brown-bag bottle of Canadian Club, plugs one of the hitmen, hightails it with the witness to a friendly nearby bar, where his backup finds him and announces, sorry, but we've got to kill the witness anyway, he's going to testify against a bunch of us police. Cop decides for once to side with his conscience and takes off again with the witness, only now the streets between them and the courthouse are filled with NYPD who want to take them both out.

As a short story in some pulp magazine of a sadly bygone era, 16 Blocks would be a dirty little gem. Crooked cops, lots of twists and turns, some tough-guy badinage spit out on the knife's edge. In the hands of Richard "Lethal Weapon" Donner, however, it morphs into a strange and weak buddy flick that mixes 48 Hrs., Die Hard: With a Vengeance, and about a dozen other cop movies together in a desperate attempt to seem vital and gritty. The result is something more than a complete failure (unlike, say, Donner's last one, Timeline) but something quite a bit less than good.

Continue reading: 16 Blocks Review

Hearts In Atlantis Review


OK
The entire time I spent watching the latest Stephen King big-screen adaptation Hearts in Atlantis, I had this nagging feeling in the back of my mind that something was missing. All the key elements of a potentially great film were present -- authentic-looking 1960s Americana scenery, great acting by Anthony Hopkins and newcomer Anton Yelchin (Delivering Milo), an intriguing story line, and strong directing by Scott Hicks. And then, at the end of the film, it just hit me like a sap across the back of the neck.

One common recurring narrative in many of King's better-known novel-to-screen adaptations -- such as Stand by Me, The Green Mile, and The Shawshank Redemption -- incorporates an older gentleman recalling his youth or a life-changing incident of his life. Hearts in Atlantis follows this to a tee. After learning of a childhood friend's death, a middle-aged photographer Robert Garfield (David Morse) ventures back to his hometown for the funeral. Upon arrival, Robert recalls memories of youth and of one innocent, fateful summer when a mysterious man named Ted Brautigan (Hopkins) entered his life and changed it forever.

Continue reading: Hearts In Atlantis Review

The Green Mile Review


Excellent
The Green Mile? Let's talk about 26 miles. The length of a marathon. Start the race and the movie together: The race would long be over before the film. The winner would be at home, taking a nap. Yes, The Green Mile is three hours long.

Not that long movies have never been successful, and not that The Green Mile is bad. You might even think a long movie is required here. Pulled from Stephen King's acclaimed series of six books by the same name, King returns to the kind of work he was doing in The Shawshank Redemption (based on a short story of his), the kind that seems to perform the best, away from splatter and gore, and into the minds of the strangest of characters.

Continue reading: The Green Mile Review

Crazy In Alabama Review


Weak
This bizarrely incoherent tale set in the segregated South mixes two stories as well as oil and water. One follows Melanie Griffith's neo-psychotic widow on a cross-country trip with her husband's decapitated head along for the ride. The second follows her nephew's quest to integrate a small town in Alabama. The only thing scarier than Griffith's black fright wig is the "directed by Antonio Banderas" credit. Talk about crazy.

Proof Of Life Review


Extraordinary
Good films are hard to find these days. Great films are beyond rare. Proof of Life, Russell Crowe's one-two punch of a deft kidnap and rescue thriller, is one of those rare gems. A taut drama laced with strong and subtle acting, an intelligent script, and masterful directing, together it delivers something virtually unheard of in the film industry these days, genuine motivation in a story that rings true.

Consider the strange coincidence of Russell Crowe's character in Proof of Life making the moves on a distraught wife played by Meg Ryan's character in the film -- all while the real Russell Crowe was hitching up with married woman Meg Ryan in the outside world. I haven't seen this much chemistry between actors since McQueen and MacGraw teamed up in Peckinpah's masterpiece, The Getaway.

Continue reading: Proof Of Life Review

Bait Review


Bad

Director Anthony Fuqua doesn't seem terribly interested in the plot of "Bait," a impotent "Enemy of the State" knock-off that reeks of a sloppy re-write designed to accommodate the comedy stylings of Jamie Foxx in the Will Smith-type role.

Fuqua's main focus is turning the picture into a resume-builder and he spends the whole two hours showing off his technique. Dripping with visual flair overkill, the chase scenes, stunts and explosions get the deluxe treatment. A 30-second sex scene is shot from about 20 angles. Even a throwaway speech Foxx gives about missing his father (it's just a line to get his ex-girlfriend in the sack) is filmed with four or five cameras -- one of them restlessly circling him as he mock-emotes -- and edited with slow-motion effects and multiple fade-ins and fade-outs.

"Lookie what I can do!" Fuqua seems to be saying, much as he did in "The Replacement Killers," Chow Yun-Fat's Hong-Kong-style American debut. "Please don't send me back to making music videos!"

Continue reading: Bait Review

The Green Mile Review


Good

"The Green Mile" begins with a little deja vu. Like Tom Hanks' last mid-Century, Oscar-baiting drama, "Saving Private Ryan," it's bookended by a modern framework that finds an old man reluctantly reminiscing about a difficult year of his life, more than half a century ago.

Because of the familiar faces and the similar prestige posturing, this platitudinous structure invites a little eye-rolling as Dabbs Greer (Reverend Alden on "Little House On the Prairie"), playing the aged Hanks, begins to spin what becomes an engrossing three-hour yarn about a year of extraordinary horrors and miracles on death row in a Louisiana state penitentiary.

Hanks plays prison guard Paul Edgecomb, an unjaded joe in charge of death row who treats people on both sides of the bars with humanity and civility. Set in 1935, the central story opens with the arrival of a kindly colossus of a condemned killer named John Coffey (Michael Clarke Duncan).

Continue reading: The Green Mile Review

Dancer In The Dark Review


Very Good

For years filmmakers have been trying to reinvent the musical. "Evita" went big, "My Best Friend's Wedding" sneaked musical numbers into its semi-standard romantic comedy, the "South Park" movie mocked the cartoon musical while besting it with genuinely catchy tunes, "Love's Labour's Lost" was an homage to the Fred and Ginger sing-songs of the 1930s.

But no one has succeeded in making a truly modern movie musical, one that employs emerging filmmaking techniques instead of reaching back 50 years for inspiration. In fact, no one has ever even attempted something like "Dancer In the Dark."

Writer and director Lars von Trier -- the reclusive Dane behind the minimalist Dogme95 movement that espouses natural lighting, no props and handheld cameras -- discovers a way to marry his trademark sparseness with the unfettered showmanship of song and dance numbers in this daring retooling of the musical genre.

Continue reading: Dancer In The Dark Review

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David Morse Movies

Concussion Trailer

Concussion Trailer

Dr. Bennet Omalu is a pathologist who loves his job and, in many ways, the...

Horns Movie Review

Horns Movie Review

With his most stylish film yet, horror specialist Alexandre Aja takes a wildly irreverent approach,...

Horns Trailer

Horns Trailer

Following the mysterious death of his girlfriend, Merrin Williams (Juno Temple), Ig Perrish (Daniel Redcliffe)...

Horns Trailer

Horns Trailer

Following the vicious rape and murder of his girlfriend Merrin Williams, Ig Perrish goes on...

Horns Trailer

Horns Trailer

Ig Perrish wakes up after a particularly drunken night with a very sore head -...

World War Z Movie Review

World War Z Movie Review

Starting as a clever Contagion-style investigative thriller, this fiercely paced apocalyptic adventure begins to fall...

World War Z Trailer

World War Z Trailer

Gerry Lane is a government employee whose job takes him on missions he never imagined...

World War Z Trailer

World War Z Trailer

Gerry Lane is a United Nations employee with a family life anyone would wish for....

Drive Angry Movie Review

Drive Angry Movie Review

Less a fully realised thriller than a series of rampaging set pieces, this rollicking movie...

Drive Angry Trailer

Drive Angry Trailer

Escaping the deepest and darkest realms of hell, Milton returns to Earth in a bid...

Mother & Child Trailer

Mother & Child Trailer

Adoption is a life changing situation for all involved.The woman who feels she must give...

The Hurt Locker Movie Review

The Hurt Locker Movie Review

It's intriguing to watch a battlefield movie that manages to be gritty and harrowing as...

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