David Johansen

David Johansen

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The Sixth Annual Norman Mailer Center And Writers Colony Benefit Gala

Mara Hennessey and David Johansen - The Sixth Annual Norman Mailer Center and Writers Colony Benefit Gala at the New York Public Library - New York City, United States - Monday 27th October 2014

David Johansen
Mara Hennessey and David Johansen

Picture - David Johansen and honoree Little... New York City, USA, Thursday 20th May 2010

David Johansen and honoree Little Jimmy Scott - David Johansen and honoree Little Jimmy Scott New York City, USA - The Jazz Foundation of America's 9th Annual A Great Night in Harlem Gala and Concert at The Apollo Theater Thursday 20th May 2010

David Johansen and honoree Little Jimmy Scott

Picture - David Johansen New York City, USA, Thursday 20th May 2010

David Johansen Thursday 20th May 2010 The Jazz Foundation of America's 9th Annual A Great Night in Harlem Gala and Concert at The Apollo Theater New York City, USA

David Johansen

Picture - David Johansen Dublin, Ireland, Tuesday 20th April 2010

David Johansen Tuesday 20th April 2010 New York Dolls performing live in concert at The Academy Dublin, Ireland

David Johansen
David Johansen
David Johansen
David Johansen
David Johansen

Scrooged Review


Good
Treatments of A Christmas Carol don't get much more quirky -- or memorable -- than this 1988 adaptation of the Dickens classic, done with no attempt to maintain respect for the stuffy source material. As a Scrooge-like TV producer (producing a live adaptation of A Christmas Carol, starring Mary Lou Retton as Tiny Tim), Bill Murray doesn't even come close to stealing the show from a host of characters who do: Bob Goldthwait as a gun-toting Cratchitt type, Carol Kane as a memorably pugilistic ghost of Christmas present, and many more. Not quite a "classic," but a roaring good time.

New York Doll Review


OK
The New York Dolls represent a curiosity in the history of rock music, a band that influenced many but never made a huge mark on its own. This small documentary tracks the rise and fall of the Dolls, focusing on Arthur "Killer" Kane, who became a Mormon after bottoming out of his drug addiction. Eventually the Dolls reunite to play a rough show, though "staging a comeback" is an awfully nice way to put it. If you're a fan of the group (or of enigmatic leader David Johansen, whose face now appears to be melting off his head), you'll enjoy the film. Others may not care enough to see it through.

Scrooged Review


Good
Treatments of A Christmas Carol don't get much more quirky -- or memorable -- than this 1988 adaptation of the Dickens classic, done with no attempt to maintain respect for the stuffy source material. As a Scrooge-like TV producer (producing a live adaptation of A Christmas Carol, starring Mary Lou Retton as Tiny Tim), Bill Murray doesn't even come close to stealing the show from a host of characters who do: Bob Goldthwait as a gun-toting Cratchitt type, Carol Kane as a memorably pugilistic ghost of Christmas present, and many more. Not quite a "classic," but a roaring good time.

Naked in New York Review


Excellent
Earnest and cute, this essential '90s rom-com has Eric Stoltz going gaga over an enchanting Mary-Louise Parker, here in perhaps the least cynical role of her career. The story borders on irrelevance: They're New Yorkers who dabble in the theater, quickly hook up, then question whether they are truly meant for each other. It's all told in flashback as Stoltz drives his car en route to... where? Like I said, very cute, but some may find it cloying.

Punk: Attitude Review


Excellent
At the start of Don Letts' excellent new documentary Punk: Attitude, ex-Black Flag-er and perennial curmudgeon Henry Rollins explains punk as being in essence one guy looking at the world he's living in and saying "Fuck this." A pithy summation of the movement, to be sure, and also quite a smart one, as this is one of the few films about the birth, death, and pseudo-revival of punk rock to actually acknowledge the genre's limitations (you can only say "Fuck this" while playing 90-second songs for so long), while simultaneously reveling in another trip down the antiestablishment memory road.

Most of the literature and documentaries on punk tend to start out in the same place, talking about how in the mid-1970s music had become this bloated, big-business monster, with pretentious arena rock bands playing 20-minute solos and so on - and then came The Ramones to shatter all that. Letts - a former producer and icon in the scene, as well as director of the authoritative documentary on The Clash, Westway to the World - digs deeper than that, going back to the 1960s and early '70s, finding the root of the coming musical uprising not just in expected places like The Velvet Underground, MC5, and Iggy Pop, but also in the jaggedly poppy sounds of many now mostly forgotten garage bands (whose sound is still inspiring post-punkers like The Hives). In describing the ascent of punk later in the '70s, Dead Kennedys frontman Jello Biafra talks about how just about every smaller town and city had one guy who was into The Stooges and The Velvet Underground who then moved to the bigger cities, met up with all the other like-minded small-town new arrivals, and started bands.

Continue reading: Punk: Attitude Review

David Johansen

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