David Hare

David Hare

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Nicole Farhi and David Hare - Shots of a host of stars as they took to the red carpet for the 60th London Evening Standard Theatre Awards 2014 which were held at the London Palladium in London, United Kingdom - Sunday 30th November 2014

Nicole Farhi and David Hare
Nicole Farhi and David Hare

'Salting The Battlefield': Is Bill Nighy Still One Of Britain's Best Actors?


Bill Nighy David Hare Helena Bonham Carter Ralph Fiennes

Salting the Battlefield, the British drama written by Sir David Hare, concluded the Worricker triology on Thursday evening (March 27, 2014) in a remarkable series that has seen Bill Nighy lead a phenomenal cast including Helena Bonham Carter, Rupert Graves, Ralph Fiennes.

Bill Nighy Salting the BattlefieldBill Nighy in 'Salting the Battlefield'

The third part of Hare's Worricker trilogy focused on Nighy's Bill Worricker - a disillusioned MI5 agent - and fellow ex-agent Margot (Carter) trying to his give his boss the slip in Germany, with a trail of subterfuge leading right back to Downing Street.

Continue reading: 'Salting The Battlefield': Is Bill Nighy Still One Of Britain's Best Actors?

David Hare and Nicole Farhi - 'Good People' press night held at the Hampstead Theatre - Outside Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 5th March 2014

David Hare and Nicole Farhi
David Hare and Nicole Farhi

David Hare and Nicole Farhi - Celebrities outside Hampstead Theatre for the production 'Good People' - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 5th March 2014

David Hare and Nicole Farhi
David Hare and Nicole Farhi

David Hare, Nicole Farhi and London Evening Standard Theatre Awards - David Hare and Nicole Farhi Sunday 25th November 2012 London Evening Standard Theatre Awards held at The Savoy

David Hare, Nicole Farhi and London Evening Standard Theatre Awards

Nicole Farhi and Sir David Hare - Nicole Farhi and Sir David Hare Saturday 20th October 2012 BFI London Film Festival Awards held at the Banqueting House - Arrivals.

Nicole Farhi and Sir David Hare
Nicole Farhi
Nicole Farhi and Sir David Hare

The Reader Review


Good
Mein Kampf meets Penthouse Forum in Stephen Daldry's The Reader, a chilly and surprisingly detached adaptation of Bernhard Schlink's passion play about a susceptible yet pensive teenage horn dog seduced by the former, female SS trooper who popped his cherry.

Reader reunites Daldry with his The Hours screenwriter, David Hare, and the two collaborate on another aloof, literary period picture. The action transitions between 1995 and 1958, when 15-year-old Michael Berg (David Kross) first comes under the spell of Hanna Schmitz (Kate Winslet), the stern but attentive woman who paid him a bit of kindness after the boy was felled by Scarlet Fever.

Continue reading: The Reader Review

Wetherby Review


Good
Enticing setup: Man finagles his way into a dinner party thrown by strangers; no one knows who he is, but they're too polite to kick him out or even ask about his identity. He spends the night, and promptly shoots himself in the head the next morning in the presence of the hostess.

WTF?

Continue reading: Wetherby Review

The Designated Mourner Review


OK
Is Wallace Shawn a genius? I won't try to deny it. The diminuitive actor and prolific writer has some amazing insight on life, and in this film, an adaptation of his stage play, three characters sit at a table and talk to the camera (and, rarely, to one another) about those insights. Think Spalding Gray, times three, but without the humor. A lack of humor is what gets this Mourner into trouble early on. While the commentary is biting, the setting (a futuristic totalitarian state out of The Handmaid's Tale) feels unfinished and false, and much of the chit-chat revolves around the death of individuality due to the new regime, not due to any real character development. As a result, Mourner is a tough nut to crack and requires your utmost attention to the smallest nuances of speech. Nichols is astounding. The other players are less so. The film on the whole feels overwhelmingly pretentious, but it certainly has its moments.

The Hours Review


Good
Stephen Daldry's The Hours is the quintessential highbrow arthouse picture of the year, the one film critics from the coasts will adore but is guaranteed to alienate audience members more in tune with Maid in Manhattan, Analyze That or The Two Towers.

Consider yourself warned. A Masters degree and a penchant for PBS' Masterpiece Theatre aren't required to fully comprehend and enjoy the picture, but they help. Hours masterfully weaves together three individual stories about three interconnected women existing in three different decades. Mentally ill author Virginia Woolf (Nicole Kidman) is on suicide watch in 1920s England as she pens her novel Mrs. Dalloway. Suburban housewife and mother Laura Brown (Julianne Moore) reads the same novel in 1951 as she suffers through a loveless marriage with her WWII veteran husband (John C. Reilly) and overprotected son, Richie (eight-year-old Jack Rovello). And modern day New York City book publisher Clarissa Vaughn (Meryl Streep) mirrors the character of Mrs. Dalloway as she plans a party for her dying ex-lover, Richard (Ed Harris), who recently won a literary prize.

Continue reading: The Hours Review

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The Hours Movie Review

The Hours Movie Review

Stephen Daldry's The Hours is the quintessential highbrow arthouse picture of the year, the one...

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