David Harbour

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Johnny Depp Shows Off Acting Talent In Monstrous 'Black Mass' Trailer [Pictures]


Johnny Depp Benedict Cumberbatch Kevin Bacon Joel Edgerton Peter Sarsgaard Adam Scott David Harbour

With the recent trailer release for 'Black Mass', it's clear to see why the world fell in love with Johnny Depp. A short clip within the trailer perfectly demonstrates the veteran actor's ability to switch at will between fun-loving and friendly, to nightmarishly monstrous, in a great acting showcase. And that creepy make-up job certainly helps.

Johnny Depp shows off his more villainous side in 'Black Mass'Johnny Depp shows off his more villainous side in 'Black Mass'

In recent years, Johnny Depp has received a critical savaging, specifically for films like 'The Lone Ranger' and 'Transcendence', but this triumphant return to form may be just what he needs before launching into an 'Alice in Wonderland' sequel, and a fifth 'Pirates of the Caribbean' film. 

Continue reading: Johnny Depp Shows Off Acting Talent In Monstrous 'Black Mass' Trailer [Pictures]

NBC/Universal's 72nd Annual Golden Globes After Party - Arrivals

David Harbour - A host of stars were snapped as they arrived for NBC/Universal's 72nd Annual Golden Globes after party. The party was sponsored in part by Chrysler, Hilton, and Qatar and was held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 12th January 2015

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Los Angeles (BBBSLA)

Sheila Vand, David Harbour, Katherine Heigl, Adam Kaufman, Alfre Woodard, Cliff Chamberlain and Jennifer Salke - 'The Big Bash,' a fundraising party for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Los Angeles (BBBSLA) - Arrivals at Beverly Hilton Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Friday 24th October 2014

Sheila Vand, David Harbour, Katherine Heigl, Adam Kaufman, Alfre Woodard, Cliff Chamberlain and Jennifer Salke
Sheila Vand, David Harbour, Katherine Heigl, Adam Kaufman, Alfre Woodard, Cliff Chamberlain and Jennifer Salke

The Equalizer Review


OK

Little more than a paint-by-numbers action thriller, it's anyone's guess why the filmmakers have bothered to make a connection with the 1980s TV series of the same name. Because this film bears almost no resemblance to it. Instead, this is a reunion of Denzel Washington and Antoine Fuqua, who last collaborated on the Oscar-winning Training Day. And since it's packed with brutal violence and questionable morality, that's clearly where this movie's roots truly lie.

Washington stars as Robert, a meek shelf-stacker at a DIY warehouse store in Boston. He can't sleep at night, so he heads to the local diner to read classic novels. That's where he meets Teri (Chloe Grace Moretz), a teen hooker who is having problems with her psychotic Russian pimp (David Meunier). Ever so quietly, and clearly relying on some external source of income, Robert goes about helping Teri secure a free future. But when he offers to settle her debts, the pimp and his thugs just laugh at him. So Robert mercilessly kills them all, drawing on his secret past as a black-ops agent. The problem is that this puts Robert at odds with the top Russian boss Teddy (Marton Csokas), who heads to Boston to get even.

In standard action movie tradition, Robert works his way right through the entire Russian mob, along the way cleaning up Boston's corrupt police force before the requisite final confrontation. His only distraction is a brief visit to his old CIA boss (Melissa Leo) and her husband (Bill Pullman) for a bit of moral support and added starry cameo value. Yes, there isn't much about this movie that doesn't feel concocted for the box office, which means that the story is both achingly predictable and littered with gaping plot-holes. And with Washington in the focal role, everyone else fades into the woodwork. Moretz is excellent but badly underused, while Csokas is never given much to do with his one-note villain.

Continue reading: The Equalizer Review

A Walk Among the Tombstones Review


Good

Although the plot isn't particularly original, a darkly internalised tone makes this low-key thriller oddly compelling. It may be the usual serial killer nastiness, but it also pays attention to earthier themes like morality and the futility of revenge. Meanwhile, Liam Neeson is able to combine his more recent action-hero persona with his serious acting chops this time. And writer-director Scott Frank infuses the film with moody grit, quietly subverting each cliche of the genre.

The action picks up eight years after Matt (Neeson) stopped drinking and quit the police force, following a shootout that went horribly wrong. It's now 1999, and New York is in the grip of Y2K paranoia. Matt is working as an unlicensed private detective who uses word-of-mouth to find clients. So Matt is intrigued when one of his 12-step friends (Boyd Holbrook) introduces his brother Kenny (Dan Stevens), a wealthy drug trafficker whose wife was kidnapped and then murdered even though he paid the ransom. As Matt digs into the case, he realises that the two killers (David Harbour and Adam David Thompson) have a left a string of similar victims in their wake, and that the murders are connected. Meanwhile, Matt takes in homeless teen TJ (Brian "Astro" Bradley), an observant kid who helps him work piece together the clues. And together they try to figure out where the killers will strike next.

This story unfolds with a remarkably gloomy tone, combining horrific violence with introspective drama. This mixture can feel rather jarring, especially as it wallows in the nastier side of human existence. Every character is tortured in more ways than one, with lost loves, physical afflictions and internal demons. Even the smaller side roles are packed with detail, including Olafur Darri Olafsson's creepy cemetery worker and Sebastian Roche's frazzled Russian mobster. All of this adds texture to the film, a welcome distraction from the grisly central plot, which is never played as a mystery, but rather as an inevitability.

Continue reading: A Walk Among the Tombstones Review

End of Watch Review


Excellent

A strong sense of camaraderie sets this edgy police thriller apart from the crowd. And it's also a change of direction for writer-director David Ayer, who has explored the dark side of police corruption in Training Day, Harsh Times and Street Kings. But this film focusses instead on two good-guy cops just trying to do their job and have happy private lives.

On the gritty streets of Los Angeles, officers Taylor and Zavala (Gyllenhaal and Pena) continually make important arrests, which really annoys their serious-minded colleague Van Hauser (Harbour) because they're usually joking around as well. But their captain (Grillo) is slowly starting to respect their work. Meanwhile, their loyal partnership in the streets spills over into their private lives, and they lend support to each other as Taylor falls in love with Janet (Kendrick) and Zavala's wife (Martinez) gives birth to their first child. On the other hand, a Mexican cartel boss has just put a price on their heads after they busted his operation.

Ayer shoots the film like a fly-on-the-wall doc, with hand-held cameras capturing each scene. Sometimes the shaky imagery is a bit distracting since it has nothing to do with the plot, but it encourages the cast to deliver offhanded, bristly performances that build our interest during the nicely meandering first half. Then things shift drastically as a major plot kicks into gear that involves what the cops call the three food groups: drugs, money and guns.

Continue reading: End of Watch Review

Picture - Daniel Sullivan, Bobby Cannavale, David... , Wednesday 12th September 2012

Daniel Sullivan, Bobby Cannavale, David Harbour, Al Pacino, Richard Schiff, Jeremy Shamos, John C, Meet, Broadway, Glengarry Glen Ross, Ballet Hispanico. New York and City Wednesday 12th September 2012 Daniel Sullivan, Bobby Cannavale, David Harbour, Al Pacino, Richard Schiff, Jeremy Shamos and John C. McGinley Meet and greet with the cast of the Broadway play ‘Glengarry Glen Ross’, held at Ballet Hispanico. New York City, USA

Daniel Sullivan, Bobby Cannavale, David Harbour, Al Pacino, Richard Schiff, Jeremy Shamos, John C, Meet, Broadway, Glengarry Glen Ross, Ballet Hispanico. New York and City

Picture - Daniel Sullivan, Al Pacino, Bobby... , Wednesday 12th September 2012

Daniel Sullivan, Al Pacino, Bobby Cannavale, David Harbour, Richard Schiff, Jeremy Shamos, John C, Meet, Broadway, Glengarry Glen Ross, Ballet Hispanico. New York and City Wednesday 12th September 2012 Daniel Sullivan, Al Pacino, Bobby Cannavale, David Harbour, Richard Schiff, Jeremy Shamos and John C. McGinley Meet and greet with the cast of the Broadway play ‘Glengarry Glen Ross’, held at Ballet Hispanico. New York City, USA

Picture - David Harbour , Sunday 9th September 2012

David Harbour Sunday 9th September 2012 attending the premiere after party for 'The Train Driver' at the Signature Theatre

David Harbour

W.E. Review


OK
Madonna takes an ambitious approach to the 1936 abdication of Edward VIII, merging the history-making romance with the story of another woman in modern-day New York. The film is a jarring hodgepodge, but it's also enjoyably watchable.

Named after the notorious Mrs Simpson, Wally (Cornish) is in a 1998 New York auction house examining a vast collection from the life of the British king who gave up the throne for the woman he loved. In swirling flashback, Wally's story is woven in with that of Edward (D'Arcy) and Wallis (Riseborough) in the 20s and 30s, including Wallis' marriages to the violent Win (Hayward) and the accommodating Ernest (Harbour). Meanwhile, Wally is stuck in a cold marriage to William (Coyle) and looked after by a kindly security guard (Isaac).

Continue reading: W.E. Review

The Green Hornet Review


Grim
An inventive anti-hero theme sets this film apart from the usual superhero movie, but excessive violence and incoherent action leave it deeply frustrating to watch. And it doesn't help that the lead character is so unlikeable.

Britt Reid (Rogen) is the slacker son of a wealthy news baron (Wilkinson). When he inherits the newspaper, he hasn't a clue what to do with it. But he starts hanging out with his dad's old valet Kato (Chou) and hires a sexy assistant (Diaz) whose intelligence he completely ignores. And with Kato, he creates the Green Hornet, who solves crime while apparently being a villain. Soon they're squaring off against the criminal mastermind Chudnofsky (Waltz) as Los Angeles descends into a violent crime war.

Continue reading: The Green Hornet Review

Revolutionary Road Review


Weak
Everyone's cage looks different. April Wheeler's is a plain, white Cape Cod with blood-red shudders that nests atop a manicured lawn in the suburbs. It's not just the house that's holding April down, though. She also feels constrained by her dissatisfied husband, their needy children, and the unfulfilled dreams she left in her wake.

Welcome to Revolutionary Road, the feel-miserable movie of 2008. For their post-Titanic reunion, Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio have teamed with American Beauty director Sam Mendes (also Winslet's husband) on a dour, shrill adaptation of Richard Yates' respected novel about an unhappy couple steadily sinking in the quicksand of their discontent.

Continue reading: Revolutionary Road Review

War of the Worlds Review


Weak
Steven Spielberg's huge-budget update of "The Warof the Worlds," H.G. Wells' seminal alien-invasion novel from 1898,is a problematic blockbuster with one essential saving grace: It's profoundlyfrightening in a way that few directors have the talent to capture.

I'm not talking about masked-psycho-with-a-chainsaw scary.That's kids' stuff. This is a slow, relentless, meticulous fear. It's thefear of uncertainty, the fear of grand-scale devastation that humanityis powerless to stop. It's a fear that fills the air like a storm and creepsup your spine in a way that's hard to shake. It is a fear not unlike whatevery American felt on September 11, 2001 -- but divorced from fact andrealigned as entertainment through the subconsciously reassuring comfortof a movie theater seat and a tub of popcorn.

It's visceral, it's psychological, and it comes more fromthe terrified performances of Tom Cruise and the remarkable Dakota Fanning(the angelic 10-year-old from "Hide& Seek" and "Manon Fire") -- as a dock-worker deadbeatdad and his daughter on the run from 100-foot alien killing machines --than from the film's hyper-realistic special effects and monsters (whicharen't that different from the ones in the shamelessly corny "Warof the Worlds" rip-off "Independence Day").

The film is worth seeing just to experience this fear,which is a testament to the power of cinema.

Continue reading: War of the Worlds Review

David Harbour

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