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Forgotten Men Terry Gilliam, Jonathan Glazer Set For Venice Film Festival


Terry Gilliam Jonathan Glazer Alfonso Cuaron Christoph Waltz Matt Damon Tilda Swinton James Franco David Gordon Green Nicolas Cage Paul Schrader Lindsay Lohan

The Venice Film Festival 2013 boasts one of the most intriguing movie line-ups of the year, with two fallen heroes of cinema coming in from the cold and testing out new material after underwhelming efforts last time out.

Terry Gilliam and Jonathan Glazer will screen their new movies, The Zero Theorem and Under the Skin.

Gilliam hasn't been seen since 2009's poorly received The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus, while Sexy Beast director Glazer was scolded by the box-office almost a decade ago with Birth.

Continue reading: Forgotten Men Terry Gilliam, Jonathan Glazer Set For Venice Film Festival

The Sitter Trailer


After Noah Jaybird is suspended from college, he ends up living back at home with his mother, where all he does is sit and watch TV. At his mother's insistence he starts looking for jobs in town but to no avail. Finally his mother recommends babysitting and after refusing, Noah reluctantly takes up an offer of babysitting the kids next door.

Continue: The Sitter Trailer

Your Highness Trailer


From the director of Pineapple Express comes a new fantasy comedy film 'Your Highness' from Entertainment One - in cinemas on April 8, 2011.

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Snow Angels Review


Good
There are about two or three different films fighting for control of the screen during David Gordon Green's powerful but flawed Snow Angels, and in the end none of them win. An adaptation by Green (All the Real Girls) from the novel by Stewart O'Nan, the film is at its core a dispiriting domestic drama in which single mother and waitress Annie (Kate Beckinsale) is trying to raise her daughter and deal with the encroaching return of her ex-husband, Glenn (Sam Rockwell), a onetime suicide case and drunk who has now found Jesus and wants back into Annie's life. Set to swirling all around this ugly and embittered core are several stories that never quite seem to plug into each other dramatically, no matter that their characters are closely interrelated via love, friendship, family, and the shockingly violent turn everything takes in the closing minutes.

Set in a small and snowbound Pennsylvania town, Snow Angels at the very least looks like a town from reality, as opposed to the idyllic villages filmmakers create when they want to tell moral fables about violence and family (see Reservation Road, In the Bedroom, and so on). It starts with a high school marching band practicing in the cold, performing in a lackluster fashion that brings about a hilariously stern lecture from their instructor (played to icy perfection by Tom Noonan). Then a pair of gunshots are heard cracking through the cold air and the film flashes back to "weeks earlier."

Continue reading: Snow Angels Review

Great World Of Sound Review


Very Good
The two twits at the center of Craig Zobel's Great World of Sound don't buy into the thievery of the music industry, but they are more than happy to be the tiny sprockets that help the machine rumble. One of them is a white weenie named Martin (Pat Healy) who has never had ambition outside of what his girlfriends do. His partner is Clarence (Kene Holliday), a big huff of a man who walks into a room and sells himself as if he were 50 bucks a pound on the open market. They report to a second-rate confidence man (John Baker) who sends them on the road to sign salt-of-the-earth musicians in the southern states.

The musicians enter a small hotel room and play for Martin and Clarence and then, after being told how they are endangering culture by keeping their talents hidden away, are asked to fork over thirty percent of the recording cost or whatever they can spare really. Clarence has a knack for selling the American dream: the idea of a huge payoff from doing very little. Martin has the sincerity of a true music fan, pouring his heart out when he actually believes in an artist. As a team, they are lethally charming and rarely lose the talent's confidence.

Continue reading: Great World Of Sound Review

Undertow Review


OK
However you may feel about David Gordon Green's movies, his strong suit is his ability to create powerful moments from the simplest daily activities. His characters feel like whole people, whether you're aware of their entire personal history or not. And the settings in which his films take place play an intricate role in the overall story without getting tedious or feeding into stereotypes.

The same could be said for Undertow, a richly filmed human drama of two boys being raised by single father John (Dermot Mulroney). Chris (Jamie Bell), being the stronger teen, is forced to do much of the labor around their small rural farm while little brother Tim (Devon Alan) eats poorly due to stomach problems. John's brother Deel (Josh Lucas) comes to stay after being released from prison to exact revenge for losing his woman and his inheritance to John, and Chris must forget his illusions of leaving familial obligations to ensure his and Tim's survival.

Continue reading: Undertow Review

All The Real Girls Review


Excellent
David Gordon Green's All the Real Girls (the follow-up to his astonishing 2000 debut George Washington) exhibits the same gently lackadaisical rhythm and acute perception of human joy and misery that made his debut such a success, even as it charts new territory. A dreamy tale of the wondrous elation and sometimes terrible sorrow that accompanies love, the Sundance hit - about the budding relationship between an immature rabble-rouser and the sister of his best friend - occasionally threatens to devolve into laughable sentimentality. But Green's assured direction and two outstanding lead performances never allow this minor masterpiece to lose its course, and the results are a sumptuous romance that pulsates with the passionate ecstasy of the smitten heart.

Paul (Paul Schneider) is a local guy working for his uncle and living with his mother in the same house he's always called home, and his abundant sexual conquests have earned him a well-deserved reputation as a licentious heartbreaker. He spends his free time with a group of lifelong buddies, drinking and looking for his next female conquest. As one former girlfriend wisely observes, Paul's the type of sleazy good-for-nothing who'll never amount to more than what he is now: a drunken, childish buffoon with no ambition. His mother puts it more bluntly: Paul is "not educated, honest, or strong."

Continue reading: All The Real Girls Review

George Washington Review


Excellent
What astonishes is not that George Washington is a good film, it's that the movie can tell such a powerful and complicated story in just 89 minutes. Its length is a telling reminder that length does not equal gravity. In fact, thinking over the last year or so of 2 1/2-hour-plus epics that never got around to saying much of anything, I'm inclined to believe that the opposite is true.

Recalling Days of Heaven and Sling Blade, George Washington takes us on a tour of the Deep South, centering on a preteen African-American named George (Richardson, not Washington -- played by Donald Holden), a boy whose skull bones have never fully developed. With his soft head, he wears a helmet wherever he goes and isn't allowed to go swimming, as the water would in some way soak into his brain, causing extreme pain.

Continue reading: George Washington Review

David Gordon Green

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David Gordon Green Movies

Stronger Trailer

Stronger Trailer

There's something about national tragedy that has the ability to unite human beings and incite...

Manglehorn Trailer

Manglehorn Trailer

To most that see him, Manglehorn isn't exactly an enigma, he's a quiet man who...

Our Brand Is Crisis Trailer

Our Brand Is Crisis Trailer

Jane 'Calamity' Bodine makes the brave move to come out of retirement as a top...

Joe Movie Review

Joe Movie Review

Nicolas Cage gives a rare internalised performance in this atmospheric drama, which has a stronger...

Prince Avalanche Movie Review

Prince Avalanche Movie Review

For this low-key comedy-drama, writer-director David Gordon Green harks back to the quirky charms of...

Prince Avalanche Trailer

Prince Avalanche Trailer

Alvin is a pretty serious highway worker who's on a long summer job to repaint...

The Sitter Trailer

The Sitter Trailer

After Noah Jaybird is suspended from college, he ends up living back at home with...

Your Highness Trailer

Your Highness Trailer

From the director of Pineapple Express comes a new fantasy comedy film 'Your Highness' from...

Snow Angels Movie Review

Snow Angels Movie Review

There are about two or three different films fighting for control of the screen during...

All The Real Girls Movie Review

All The Real Girls Movie Review

David Gordon Green's All the Real Girls (the follow-up to his astonishing 2000 debut George...

George Washington Movie Review

George Washington Movie Review

What astonishes is not that George Washington is a good film, it's that the movie...

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