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68th Annual Directors Guild Of America Awards

Amanda Peet , David Benioff - 68th Annual Directors Guild Of America Awards at Hyatt Regency Century Plaza - Century City, California, United States - Saturday 6th February 2016

Amanda Peet and David Benioff
Amanda Peet
Amanda Peet
Amanda Peet and David Benioff

22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards - Arrivals

Amanda Peet , David Benioff - 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Expo Hall - Arrivals at Shrine Auditorium, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th January 2016

Amanda Peet and David Benioff
Amanda Peet
Amanda Peet
Amanda Peet
Amanda Peet

The 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards - Arrivals

Amanda Peet , David Benioff - 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Expo Hall - Arrivals at The Shrine Expo Hall, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th January 2016

Amanda Peet and David Benioff
Amanda Peet
Amanda Peet
Amanda Peet
Amanda Peet
Amanda Peet

Amanda Peet Considering Divorcing David Benioff, ‘Game Of Thrones’ Showrunner, Over Her Favourite Character’s Death


Amanda Peet David Benioff Game Of Thrones Kit Harington

Amanda Peet is considering divorcing her husband, Game Of Thrones showrunner David Benioff, because he did not forewarn her of the death of one of her favourite characters on the show (spoiler alert for anyone who hasn’t seen season 5).

Amanda PeetAmanda Peet at the 87th Academy Awards Vanity Fair party in Los Angeles, February 2015.

Read More: Game Of Thrones: New The Winds Of Winter Released Online By George R.R. Martin.

Continue reading: Amanda Peet Considering Divorcing David Benioff, ‘Game Of Thrones’ Showrunner, Over Her Favourite Character’s Death

Emilia Clarke Talks 'Game Of Thrones' Scripts And "Mental" Sixth Season


Emilia Clarke David Benioff

Fresh from her Primetime Emmy nomination for her portrayal of Daenerys Targaryen, 'Game of Thrones' star Emilia Clarke is already getting excited about the sixth season of the fantasy series, telling fans to expect some "mental" scenes.

Emilia Clarke at the Berlin premiere of Terminator GenisysEmilia Clarke promises big things for 'Game of Thrones'

Speaking to Variety, the actress said, "I'm looking forward to absolutely every part of it, it's like go-go-go from episode one.

Continue reading: Emilia Clarke Talks 'Game Of Thrones' Scripts And "Mental" Sixth Season

'Game Of Thrones' Stuns Audiences With Season 5's Episode 9 [Spoilers]


George R. R. Martin David Benioff Stephen Dillane Iwan Rheon Carice Van Houten Emilia Clarke Game Of Thrones

HBO's 'Game Of Thrones' has been getting a lot of criticism this year for it's massively dramatic departures from the book series 'A Song of Ice and Fire', upon which the show is based. While series creator George R. R. Martin stated on his official blog "there has seldom been any TV series as faithful to its source material" and reiterated how the show and the books are entirely separate stories, albeit with the same intended ending.   

Kerry Ingram as Shireen Baratheon falls victim to the ninth episodeShireen Baratheon (Kerry Ingram) falls victim to the ninth episode

That still doesn't excuse the sudden, unexpected (and rather brutal execution) of a young girl, in Sunday night's infamous Episode Nine 'The Dance of Dragons'. Written by show creators David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, the episode saw Stannis Baratheon (Stephen Dillane) hounded by Ramsey Bolton's (Iwan Rheon) guerrilla tactics, and offering his daughter Shireen (Kerry Ingram) to the priestess Melisandre (Carice Van Houten) as a sacrifice. Said sacrifice involved burning her alive to appease the Red God, with the hopes of turning their luck and winning him the Iron Throne once and for all. 

Continue reading: 'Game Of Thrones' Stuns Audiences With Season 5's Episode 9 [Spoilers]

David Benioff Departs From Los Angeles International Airport

David Benioff - David Benioff, co-creator and showrunner of award-winning HBO series 'Game of Thrones' departs from Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 26th February 2015

David Benioff
David Benioff
David Benioff
David Benioff
David Benioff
David Benioff

66th Primetime Emmy Awards - Press Room

David Benioff and Amanda Peet - 66th Primetime Emmy Awards - Press Room held at The Nokia Theatre L.A. Live! at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live!, Primetime Emmy Awards, Emmy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 26th August 2014

David Benioff and Amanda Peet
David Benioff and Amanda Peet
David Benioff and Amanda Peet

'Game Of Thrones' Will Not Re-Cast Ser Denys Mallister Out Of Respect For JJ Murphy's Memory


George R. R. Martin David Benioff

Following actor JJ Murphy’s death on Monday, his character in Game of Thrones is still in question. The actor had just started filming as Ser Denys Mallister in the HBO series, when he collapsed and died on Friday. Mr. Murphy was 84.

Game of Thrones
JJ Murphy's role will not be re-cast for season 5.

With his theater background, Murphy was a great choice for the role calm, kind and courteous Ser Mallister. Murphy had been working on the Northern Irish theatre scene since the 1940s and was an active member of Equity, the British actors’ union and had worked for years at Belfast’s Lyric Theatre. Murphy also played a village elder in the upcoming feature Dracula Untold and appeared in the CBBC series The Sparticle Mystery.

Continue reading: 'Game Of Thrones' Will Not Re-Cast Ser Denys Mallister Out Of Respect For JJ Murphy's Memory

Brothers Review


OK
This remake of Susanne Bier's 2004 drama is an equally powerful story of family tensions and how violence affects more than just the victim. But the original Danish film's strained melodrama translates here as well.

Sam Cahill (Maguire) is a loyal Marine getting ready to head back to Afghanistan with his men. His wife Grace (Portman) is trying to be strong for their young daughters (Madison and Geare), but his stern father (Shepard) couldn't be prouder. Just before he ships out, Sam's black-sheep brother Tommy (Gyllenhaal) gets out of prison and, when Sam is reported killed in action, he rises to the challenge to help care for Grace and the girls. But several months later Sam is found, and what he experienced has left him dangerously paranoid.

Continue reading: Brothers Review

X-Men Origins: Wolverine Review


Excellent
You have to feel sorry for the X-Men franchise. It was once the standard bearer for comic book movies, a monopoly it managed to hold onto until Christopher Nolan and a certain Dark Knight raised and reset the bar substantially higher. Now, the mutant movie series is little more than a fading memory, a reminder of when Hollywood hoped to find a way to translate favorite graphic novels into massive motion picture successes. Oddly enough, Fox may have discovered the secret to staying relevant in a post-Batman reboot era -- and the answer is Hugh Jackman. Capable of carrying even the most mediocre effort, he singlehandedly makes X-Men Origins: Wolverine an excellent start to the summer 2009 season.

As a young boy, James Howlett (Jackman) was sickly. Doted on by his doctor father, a tragedy sends him out into the world alone -- alone, that is except for his half-brother Victor (Liev Schrieber). After surviving several wars together, the boys meet up with military man William Stryker (Danny Huston) and along with a group of fellow mutants, they search the globe for an elusive metal derived from a meteorite. When Howlett, now renamed Logan, sees the atrocities committed in pursuit of said goal, he walks away. Six years later, Stryker and Victor come calling, wanting their former ally to participate in an experiment. Fusing his frame with an experimental alloy, Logan becomes Wolverine. Unfortunately, he soon after finds himself a pawn in a much larger crusade against his kind, with his murderous sibling front and center.

Continue reading: X-Men Origins: Wolverine Review

The Kite Runner Review


OK
Practically no other nation's modern history has been so rife with grief and shattered expectations as that of Afghanistan; a fact utilized to maximum effect by Marc Foster in his adaptation of Khaled Hosseini's book club blockbuster The Kite Runner. Starting in the relatively chaos-free years before the Soviet invasion and concluding in the middle of the Taliban's theocratic lockdown, the film manages the difficult task of tracking massive historical upheavals while keeping tightly focused on the people forced to live through such tumultuous changes.

The character who ties the whole narrative together is Amir, a spoiled brat of a kid who turns into a spoiled writer as an adult only to grudgingly submit himself to the rigors of becoming a hero near the conclusion. In the mid-1970s, the young Amir (Zekiria Ebrahimi) lives with his prosperous father, or Baba, in a nice house in Kabul. Amir lives a pretty decent and sheltered life, his best friend, the fiercely loyal Hassan (played with emphatic nobility by Ahmad Khan Mahmoodzada), is the son of the family's head servant, and will do practically anything Amir wants. His Baba is a proudly educated and modern man, with his jazz records, turtlenecks, bottles of liquor, and well-kept Mustang; the last particularly beloved by the Steve McQueen-worshipping boys. Amir and Hassan are an excellent team when it comes to the fascinating Afghan take on kite-flying, where pairs of boys get into high-altitude duels, trying to cut the strings of their opponents kites (the sport was later banned when the Taliban came to power).

Continue reading: The Kite Runner Review

Troy Review


OK
"War is young men dying and old men talking," bellows one Greek leader following a mighty clash in Troy. He might as well be talking about the movie itself. Director Wolfgang Petersen heaps handfuls of clashing titans together with dry speeches on historic nobility. He ends up with a handsome yet long-winded restaging of the war waged between Greece and the warriors of Troy over the hand of lovely Helen (Diane Kruger, a nondescript mixture of Leelee Sobieski and Natalie Portman).

Troy leaves the talking to its triumvirate of Hollywood royalty - Brian Cox, Brendan Gleeson, and Peter O'Toole. The dying is left up to the chiseled and marketable studs - Eric Bana, Orlando Bloom, and Brad Pitt. Whenever a member of the veteran trio interacts with a member of the other on screen, it creates a mismatch of talent not even a Trojan Horse could overcome.

Continue reading: Troy Review

Stay Review


Excellent
I don't see dead people, and, more than likely, I never will. Maybe one day, when I die, I'll see plenty of them but while I am of this earth, it's a no-go. This is not to say people don't see spirits, ghosts, and specters; walk down any street in Manhattan and you're likely to see a woman telling you she can see them and hold pretty strong conversation with them. Hollywood saw this and also saw dollar signs. Blame M. Night Shyamalan for most of this. He made a great movie and has spawned legions of gutter-sludge rip-offs. Once in awhile, however, we get an arty riff on this formula. The last one was Jonathan Glazer's haunting Birth, and now we have Marc Forster's hypnotic Stay.

So, this suicidal college student walks into a psychiatrist's office... no, seriously. Sam (Ewan McGregor) has the misfortune of substituting for a few sessions for a colleague (Janeane Garofalo) when she gets a little loopy with the drugs. Her first patient, and seemingly only patient, is Henry Letham (Ryan Gosling). On only their second meeting, Henry announces that he is going to kill himself in three days, at midnight. Sam spends the rest of his time, divided between his ex-patient/girlfriend (Naomi Watts) and trying to figure out why Henry wants to kill himself. And don't forget Henry's dead parents (Bob Hoskins and Kate Burton) who show up in the real world. Describing past that would be like trying to explain a Lynch film (notably Lost Highway and Mulholland Drive), and no one should have these secrets ruined.

Continue reading: Stay Review

25th Hour Review


Extraordinary
If you were to write a screenplay about a drug dealer who has just 24 hours of freedom left before he begins a seven-year prison sentence, what would you have him do? Repent? Fashion an elaborate escape? Have plenty of sex? That's probably why you haven't authored any Oscar-quality screenplays lately. Writer David Benioff, on the other hand, is likely to see a little golden statuette up close next year for his work on 25th Hour, a remarkable new film based on his novel of the same name.

Neither tearjerker nor suspenseful crime drama, 25th Hour is extraordinary in that it avoids all the clichés that such a premise so often invites. It is instead a carefully focused character study about a charismatic but condemned man who must come to grips with his sentence before morning. Edward Norton plays Montgomery Brogan, the felon in question. He spends his last free hours visiting his father (Brian Cox) and attending a going away party in his honor at a New York nightclub. In tow are his girlfriend (Rosario Dawson) and his two childhood pals, Frank (Barry Pepper) and Jakob (Philip Seymour Hoffman) -- the latter of which is so perfectly cast that you can't help but chuckle the first time you see Hoffman give his usual dyspeptic sneer, signaling that he is disgusted not only with his high school English students but essentially the entire outcome of his life.

Continue reading: 25th Hour Review

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