Daveigh Chase

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Celebrity Magenta Carpet Arrivals At The Launch Party For Google Music Available On T-Mobile held at Mr Brainwash Studio

Daveigh Chase Wednesday 16th November 2011 Celebrity Magenta Carpet Arrivals At The Launch Party For Google Music Available On T-Mobile held at Mr Brainwash Studio Los Angeles, California

Daveigh Chase
Daveigh Chase

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Official Launch Party held at Belasco Theatre

Daveigh Chase Tuesday 8th November 2011 The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Official Launch Party held at Belasco Theatre Los Angeles, California

Daveigh Chase
Daveigh Chase
Daveigh Chase
Daveigh Chase
Daveigh Chase

S. Darko Review


Unbearable
Some movies don't deserve a sequel. Not because they weren't successful or have a storyline incapable of carrying a franchise. No, some films are so inherently insular, so completely and utterly self-contained that to try and extrapolate them out over one (or more) additional entries makes little or no sense. Richard Kelly's surprising cult phenomenon Donnie Darko is a good example of such a cinematic solo shot. It remains an original and disturbing vision of suburban ennui and teenage angst wrapped up in a surreal science fiction fable about time travel and the tangential universes it can create. Thanks to its massive success on DVD, a follow-up is now being offered. Sadly, if it accomplishes anything, S. Darko proves that once was definitely enough.

It's been seven years since the events involving Samantha Darko (Daveigh Chase, reprising her role from the original film) and her family, including big brother Donnie, played out. Now 18, she decides to join her best friend Corey (Briana Evigan) on a road trip to California. There, Sam hopes to become a professional dancer. Unfortunately, their car breaks down outside a one-horse town in the middle of Utah. While they wait for replacement parts, the girls meet up with local rebel Randy (Ed Westwick), crazed preacher John Mellit (Matthew Davis), and equally fanatical parishioner Trudy Potter (Elizabeth Berkley). When a meteor hits the tiny burg late one night, it sets into motion a chain of events that has Samantha having horrific visions of the end of the world. It's a fate she shares with a Gulf War veteran (James Lafferty) who is convinced that Armageddon will occur on July 4, 1995.

Continue reading: S. Darko Review

Star magazine's Young Hollywood party held at the Apple Lounge - Outside

Daveigh Chase Wednesday 11th March 2009 Star magazine's Young Hollywood party held at the Apple Lounge - Outside Hollywood, California

Daveigh Chase
Daveigh Chase
Daveigh Chase
Daveigh Chase
Daveigh Chase

Star Magazine Event Celebrating 'Young Hollywood' Issue held Apple Restaurant & Lounge - Arrivals

Daveigh Chase Wednesday 11th March 2009 Star Magazine Event Celebrating 'Young Hollywood' Issue held Apple Restaurant & Lounge - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Daveigh Chase
Daveigh Chase

Lilo & Stitch Review


Terrible
There are three essential elements for a polished Disney animated film: rich and detailed animation, inspirational music that is catchy and clever, and a clear message that is easy to understand. Alas, Disney's latest, Lilo & Stitch, fails to live up to any of these.

Lilo & Stitch tells the story of two outcasts searching for a place to fit in. Lilo is a young Hawaiian girl who is shunned by her friends because she picks fights and plays unfairly. Her older sister, Nani, is raising her because their parents died in a car crash. The social worker assigned to their case has threatened to remove Lilo from Nani's care because she cannot control Lilo's poor behavior. It sounds like the prototypical dysfunctional American family - how un-Disney-like!

Continue reading: Lilo & Stitch Review

Big Love: Season One Review


Good
In its first season, Big Love was often summarily referred to as "the polygamy show." True enough, but as with many of HBO's finer offerings, it offers more than meets the eye. And the expectations. While Big Love doesn't deliver the consistency or tension many HBO fans enjoy in The Sopranos, there's enough in this bizarre drama to support a solid DVD-viewing addiction.

From the first notes of The Beach Boys' "God Only Knows" ringing under an otherworldly opening credit sequence, Big Love hints at a combination of somber connection and sincere personal adoration. At the center is Bill Henrickson (Bill Pullman), an ambitious home superstore owner who lives a clean, Utah Mormon life... along with his three wives and gaggle of kids.

Continue reading: Big Love: Season One Review

Lilo & Stitch Review


Terrible
There are three essential elements for a polished Disney animated film: rich and detailed animation, inspirational music that is catchy and clever, and a clear message that is easy to understand. Alas, Disney's latest, Lilo & Stitch, fails to live up to any of these.

Lilo & Stitch tells the story of two outcasts searching for a place to fit in. Lilo is a young Hawaiian girl who is shunned by her friends because she picks fights and plays unfairly. Her older sister, Nani, is raising her because their parents died in a car crash. The social worker assigned to their case has threatened to remove Lilo from Nani's care because she cannot control Lilo's poor behavior. It sounds like the prototypical dysfunctional American family - how un-Disney-like!

Continue reading: Lilo & Stitch Review

Spirited Away Review


Excellent
Bizarre events unfold with an easy inevitability in the world of Spirited Away, director Hayao Miyazaki's latest anime opus. Miyazaki's heroine Chihiro is a modern-day Alice, trying to make sense of a fantastic and threatening looking glass world. But Spirited Away shares the soul of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, if the chocolate factory was replaced by a giant spa for stressed out ghosts. Like Charlie in Wonka's factory, Chihiro spends two hours navigating a byzantine bathhouse, transcending danger and chaos with innocent courage and naïve common sense. Spirited Away's imagination, visual brilliance, and humanity make this trip one of the most satisfying film experiences of the year.

Spirited Away begins with the young Chihiro reluctantly accompanying her family as they explore a deserted amusement park. The girl's parents are seduced by a feast set up in one of the park's food stands and eventually turn into pigs. At sunset Chihiro is transported into an alternate phantom universe filled with lumbering radish men, the shrill and controlling witch Yubaba (voiced by Suzanne Pleshette in her finest performance since Oh God, Book II), and a trio of bouncing, disembodied heads. Looking for a way to free her parents and find a way home keeps Chihiro exploring this world long enough to uncover enough strange and amazing creatures to keep us glued to the screen for the duration.

Continue reading: Spirited Away Review

A.I. Artificial Intelligence Review


OK
I remember sitting in a movie theater at the tender age of 14, watching a little film called D.A.R.Y.L., about a boy with a computer brain trying to cope with modern society and questions of emotion and identity. D.A.R.Y.L. was not some overblown, 2 1/2-hour ordeal. It was 99 breezy minutes of fun fun fun!

A.I. Artificial Intelligence is, too my deep dismay, neither breezy nor particularly fun. The level of anticipation of the film, of course, would be impossible to effectively sate, but A.I. just doesn't cut it. It doesn't even come close.

Continue reading: A.I. Artificial Intelligence Review

The Rats Review


Unbearable
Lock the doors and bolt the windows, because they're coming--thousands of big, smelly rats, scampering underneath New York City, sticking their long, slippery noses above the sewers! With a premise involving critters overrunning a major metropolitan area, The Rats has potential. After all, the concept undeniably sparks interest; if rats helped spread a deadly plague through Europe during the 14th century, think of the possible bacterial chaos they could erupt in modern-day Manhattan.

The Rats, however, aims for a much lower target. Instead of disease and contamination possibilities, the movie involves a violent colony of genetically altered rodents overrunning a Manhattan department store on a rampage to terrorize the entire city. Why would a colony of rats want to seize the population of New York? The movie does not have this answer, so it continually features scenes of the rats scurrying through pipes, sewers, subways, stores, and just about every else. Occasionally, an innocent bystander gets in their way, and they quickly become rodent food.

Continue reading: The Rats Review

The Ring Two Review


Terrible

Abandoning the gimmicky defining premise of itspredecessor, about the ghost of an evil littlegirl exacting blood-curdling vengeance on anyone who watched a hauntedvideo tape, "The Ring Two" seems also to have jettisoned allnotions of pacing, creative chills and common sense.

Catching up with newspaper reporter NaomiWatts (whose talents are wasted on B-movie screams)and her hollow-eyed son (David Dorfman) after they've survived the firstfilm by slipping through a gaping hole in its own internal logic, "TheRing Two" gives its poltergeist arbitrary new powers to track thesetwo down to a small West Coast town and possess the boy's body.

Little else happens in the course of the story, exceptthat Watts' suspicious attempts at exorcism draw the attention of the localChild Protective Services. The kid ends up in the hospital (from whichhe easily escapes and no search is ever mounted) while Watts tracks downthe ghostly girl's asylum-confined birth mother (Sissy Spacek) for somelong-winded exposition laying out the new rules of the plot.

Continue reading: The Ring Two Review

The Ring Review


Grim

"The Ring" opens with a scene straight out of a teen horror movie: A high school girl is trying to scare a friend with the supposedly true story of a haunted videotape -- if you watch it, you die in seven days.

The other girl turns white as a sheet, not because the story scares her, but because she's actually seen the tape -- seven days before.

What follows is an chilling five minutes of eerie goings-on in which director Gore Verbinski ("The Mexican") skillfully winds the audience up like a jack-in-the-box, then sets us jumping at his pleasure with the simplest scare-movie tricks. A TV turns on to static, by itself, immediately after being turned off -- and unplugged. The phone rings menacingly. One girl searches for the other, sees water leaking out from under the bathroom door and s-l-o-w-l-y reaches for the knob.

Continue reading: The Ring Review

Spirited Away Review


Weak

Maybe I just don't "get" anime. I've been trying for years, and several movies from this often-mythological genre of Japanese animation have bowled me over: "The Ghost in the Shell," "Akira" and this year's "Metropolis," for starters. The enchanting, fantastic "Kiki's Delivery Service," by Hayao Miyazaki, the Steven Spielberg of anime, is a particular favorite of mine.

But while all my fellow film critics seem to think Miyazaki's new film, "Spirited Away," is one of his very best, the fable-istic story of a little girl trapped in a parallel world of spirits left me unaffected and completely indifferent.

The picture begins with 10-year-old Chihiro (given the voice of Daveigh Chase -- Lilo in Disney's "Lilo and Stitch" -- for the film's American release) reluctantly following her curious, irresponsibly clueless parents into a hidden, abandoned building while looking for a back road to the new house they're just about to move in to.

Continue reading: Spirited Away Review

Daveigh Chase

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