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Shia LaBeouf Takes To The Skies For ANOTHER Apology For Plagiarism


Shia LaBeouf Daniel Clowes

Shia LaBeouf has taken to the skies for his latest apology to graphic novel writer Daniel Clowes over plagiarism. We all know the story by now - Shia ripped huge chunks of his short movie HowardCantour.com from one of Clowes' books - but the actor is still keen to show that he is oh, so very sorry.

Shia LaBeoufShia LaBeouf Has Apologised To Daniel Clowes, Again

"I am sorry Daniel Clowes," read a message over the Los Angeles skyline this week - an image later posted by LaBeouf on his official Twitter feed. Yep, that's an apology in the sky.

Continue reading: Shia LaBeouf Takes To The Skies For ANOTHER Apology For Plagiarism

Shia LaBeouf Apologises For Plagiarism... In Skywriting


Shia LaBeouf Daniel Clowes

Shia LaBeouf found himself under deep scrutiny after airing his new short film, HowardCantour.com, in December last year after some people noticed some glaring similarities between it and the Daniel Clowes comic Justin M. Damiano. As Shia continues to find himself in negative discussion, he wrote an apology to Clowes in a rather elaborate fashion, by taking to the skies.

Shia LaBeouf
LaBeouf was placed under heavy scrutiny after ripping off Clowes' work

"I am sorry Daniel Clowes," the message hanging off the end of a skywriter plane read. LaBeouf tweeted a picture of the plane and message afterwards along with the note, "CLOUD: - vapor floating in the atmosphere - remote servers used to SHARE DATA - to make LESS CLEAR or TRANSPARENT."

Continue reading: Shia LaBeouf Apologises For Plagiarism... In Skywriting

"I F*cked Up" Shia LaBeouf Has Done A Little Bit of Plagiarism


Shia LaBeouf Daniel Clowes

Shia LaBeouf's short movie HowardCantour.com - which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival Critic's Week sidebar in 2012 - was made available online on Monday (December 16, 2013) and it didn't take long for the haters to start piling in.

Shia LaBeoufShia LaBeouf Sort Of Admitted To Plagiarising

When we say haters, what we actually mean is movie fans who noticed the distinct similarities between LaBeouf's movie and Daniel Clowes' comic book Justin M. Damiano. Articles began popping up dissecting the similarities between the movies and Clowes' text and HowardCantour.com disappeared behind a password protected wall, according to Entertainment Weekly.

Continue reading: "I F*cked Up" Shia LaBeouf Has Done A Little Bit of Plagiarism

Art School Confidential Review


Excellent
Few things are more mystifying to outsiders than the world of modern art. Which of course makes it the perfect backdrop for a Terry Zwigoff film. Where else is eccentricity, flamboyance, and pretension considered normal? And who's more alienated and misunderstood than an art student rejected by his art school classmates, who are, quite naturally, alienated and misunderstood themselves? Art School Confidential, Zwigoff's latest, mines this territory for humor and poignancy, raising questions about the nature of art and alienation.As in Zwigoff's previous films, which include Crumb, Ghost World, and Bad Santa, Art School's hero is far from heroic. Played by Max Minghella, with his dark eyes and brooding bushy brows, Jerome Platz is a young art student whose primary aspiration is to be the greatest artist of the 21st century, the next Picasso. His secondary concern -- to find an emotional, intellectual, erotic connection with a woman -- proves even more ambitious since he feels only one girl, luminous art model Audrey (Sophia Myles), is worthy of his attention.The trouble is, after an initial connection with Jerome, Audrey shifts her attention to another freshman painter, the hunky Jonah, whose simple, innocent paintings have turned him into something of a campus hero. In order to win Audrey back, Jerome asks for the help of Jimmy (Jim Broadbent), a bitter, reclusive, alcoholic painter. Broadbent's performance is the film's strongest, which is saying something in a film packed with celebrated actors. His Jimmy is sensitive and fearsome, wise, and terrible -- all at once. At several points in the film, during fits of artistic pique, Jimmy's eyes flash with anger and fix on Jerome -- and the misery of a rotten, wasted life paralyzes both Jerome and the audience. The jolting power of these moments, of Broadbent's poisonous eyes, makes his turn a thing to behold.Jerome's classmates and instructors at the Strathmore Institute figure prominently in the film's wry exploration of what makes good art good, and what makes the truest art timeless. Professor Sandiford (John Malkovich) is a failed painter who is unable to see Jerome's talent and potential but wouldn't mind sleeping with him. Jerome's roommate Vince (Ethan Suplee, of TV's My Name Is Earl) is a fast-talking, sexually obsessed film student. And Jerome's friend Bardo is a talentless, wayward womanizer who doesn't belong in art school. Several heavyweight actors play the bit parts that round out the cast, including Angelica Huston as a sage art history professor, Steve Buscemi as a freewheeling gallery owner, and Michael Lerner as a greedy art dealer.Art School marks Zwigoff's second collaboration with Daniel Clowes, who wrote both the screenplay and the graphic novel on which it was based. Their first collaboration, the 2001 film Ghost World, earned them an avalanche of critical praise and an Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay. However, Art School isn't as good as Ghost World, despite their abundant similarities. The connection between the central characters in Ghost World, Thora Birch's Enid and Buscemi's Seymour, was fascinating, odd, and easily understood. Jerome and Audrey's relationship, meanwhile, never takes shape, partly because Audrey's character is completely lifeless. Zwigoff and Clowes never get around to showing us who she is or what she wants. It's never clear why she would turn her back on Jerome to pursue Jonah when she knows better than anyone that Jerome is the real talent.Such problems keep Art School from the heights of achievement of Ghost World and Crumb, but don't keep it from being a provocative, entertaining movie. Art School will go down as a minor work from the maker of off-kilter gems.Between you and me...

Ghost World Review


Excellent
It's been seven years since director Terry Zwigoff impressed moviegoers with his documentary Crumb, an uncomfortable look at pop comic artist R. Crumb and his disturbing, grotesque, dysfunctional family. Zwigoff's ability to make viewers squirm and laugh at the same time is again in full bloom, with the fictional Ghost World, a funny, sympathetic look at a whole new group of awkward, unhappy people.

Based on a comic/graphic novel by Daniel Clowes (who co-wrote the screenplay adaptation with Zwigoff), Ghost World provides the point-of-view of young Enid, just out of high school, and aimless in both direction and identity. In the able hands of Thora Birch, who's already suffered the ennui of suburbia in American Beauty, Enid is a caustic, sarcastic, yet charming, sweetie. Birch is in practically every scene of the film, and anchors it with perfect tone.

Continue reading: Ghost World Review

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