Dan Futterman

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2015 Writers Guild Awards West Coast Ceremony

E. Max Frye and Dan Futterman - Photographs of a host of stars as they arrived for the 2015 Writers Guild Awards West Coast ceremony which were held at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza in Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 14th February 2015

Dan Futterman
Dan Futterman
Dan Futterman
E. Max Frye and Dan Futterman
E. Max Frye and Dan Futterman

Foxcatcher Review


Excellent

Director Bennett Miller continues to skilfully probe around the edges of true stories with this follow-up to Capote and Moneyball, although this is a much, much darker tale. Actually, it's such an unnerving series of events that it's not easy to watch, and its characters aren't easy to like. But it's so expertly shot and edited, with startlingly full-on performances from the entire cast, that it can't help but get under the skin and chill us to the bone.

It opens after the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, where Mark Schultz (Channing Tatum) and and his big brother David (Mark Ruffalo) both won gold medals for wrestling. But they need help with funding to train for Seoul 1988, and Mark gets a remarkable offer from billionaire John du Pont (Steve Carell) to start a wrestling team at his vast Foxcatcher estate in New England, which is known for the thoroughbred horses managed by John's imperious mother Jean (Vanessa Redgrave). Aside from wanting to stay home with his wife (Sienna Miller) and kids, David doesn't trust John, so Mark heads to Foxcatcher on his own. But John's obsession knows no bounds, and soon he lures David and family to join them.

Initially, John's interest in wrestling feels like a mere eccentricity, a way of creating a team of "thoroughbreds" to rival his mother's prize-winning horses. But Carell cleverly plays the role with an insinuating glint that makes us wonder what he's up to, and his wrestlers see it too, going along with his nutty plans simply because the money is so good. Then the squirm-inducing twists and turns start, as John introduces Mark to cocaine and everything starts to spiral out of control. Nearly unrecognisable with a prosthetic hook nose, Carell is genuinely terrifying because his performance burns so slowly.

Continue reading: Foxcatcher Review

2014 Television Critics Association Summer Press Tour

Dan Futterman - 2014 Television Critics Association Summer Press Tour - FOX All-Star Party at Soho House in West Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 21st July 2014

Fox Summer TCA All-Star Party

Dan Futterman - Fox Summer TCA All-Star Party - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 20th July 2014

Dan Futterman
Dan Futterman
Dan Futterman

A Mighty Heart Review


Excellent
It's a sign of filmmaking prowess, and occasionally genius, when a director can hand viewers a scenario with a foregone conclusion and make them get lost in the story anyway. In A Mighty Heart, Michael Winterbottom shows that he is definitely that kind of director, flinging us into a panicked maelstrom of chases and false leads that all lead to the same murderous finale, one that is likely clear even to people unfamiliar with the true story the film is closely molded from. Daniel Pearl, respected and beloved journalist for the Wall Street Journal, was kidnapped in Karachi in late January 2002 as he was researching a story on the shoe-bomber Richard Reid. His pregnant wife, journalist Mariane Pearl, marshals an ad-hoc group of his co-workers, Pakistani police, and U.S. officials to find him before it's too late. They're too late.

At the time, Pearl's kidnapping was like a tertiary aftershock to 9/11, proving that nobody was safe. The World Trade Center, international symbol of dominating Western capitalism, made sense as a target. Pearl, a universally respected journalist (evidence shows that "beloved" would actually not have been too strong a description of people's feelings about him) who wanted only to understand the terrorists and to explain them to the world, made no sense. And it's that swirling fog of frightened confusion that Winterbottom evokes so powerfully in A Mighty Heart, one of the best films yet made about modern terrorism.

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Urbania Review


Grim
Er... huh? This bizarre updating of After Hours puts Griffin Dunne lookalike Dan Futterman in the body of a gay man dealing with a mysterious tragedy. Over the course of a weekend, he encounters one stranger after another, each of whom relates to him some urban legend (eg. the kidney thief), which we see played out for us in the foreground or background. Based on a play I've never heard of, most of the movie is nonsense, though some of it can be fun. The homosexual content is a stretch, though, and doesn't really fit the rest of the movie.

Capote Review


Excellent
Capturing the inspirational process of a quirky character can be a daunting task. You have to weigh informational material with a big personality, and keep these two balanced over the course of a changing story without getting bogged down with proving a truth or allowing an actor to get so overwhelming that you miss the entire point of the film.

Hence why Philip Seymour Hoffman is such a perfect choice to play Truman Capote in a film about the research that became the book In Cold Blood. Not only does he look like him and sound like him, but because Capote was such an enormous personality in his own right, the smallest glimpse into Hoffman's movements or talk speaks volumes. He conveys so much with so little, and he's able to provide an amazing performance of the four years it took to write his biggest seller.

Continue reading: Capote Review

Enough Review


Good
Agh... not another movie where a battered, defenseless chick learns to kick bad guy butt. How many times have audiences endured this sluggish story in the past ten years? But hey, just because it's been done before doesn't mean it can't work again. Michael Apted's "self defense isn't murder" thriller may reek of familiarity like yesterday's garbage, but the intense chemistry between the leading actors actually makes the film work.

Working class waitress Slim (Lopez) finds herself living a dream when she marries a loving, wealthy contractor named Mitch (Campbell). They settle into a flawless suburban life and eventually give birth to an adorable daughter, Gracie. Everything seems to be perfect for Slim.

Continue reading: Enough Review

Shooting Fish Review


Excellent
Sweet and entertaining romantic comedy/con man story about two orphans who bilk everyone in London for two million pounds, and, of course, find a little love along the way. Fun and light-hearted, though it could've been reallllly grim.

Enough Review


Terrible

If you've seen the TV commercials, the theatrical trailer, or even the poster or print ads for the 100-percent unoriginal woman-in-peril thriller "Enough," then you've seen the whole movie. What kind of marketing campaign gives away the ending in the tag line?

"Self defense is not murder," Jennifer Lopez breathes with angry determination in the voice-over on the ads. Seeing as the movie is about a woman on the run from her abusive husband (Billy Campbell), that pretty much wraps it up, doesn't it?

Besides, haven't we seen this movie before? Say 10 years ago when it starred Julia Roberts and was called "Sleeping With the Enemy"? Or 15 years ago when it starred Farrah Fawcett and was called "The Burning Bed"?

Continue reading: Enough Review

Dan Futterman

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