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Death At A Funeral Review


Good
Frank Oz, better known as the voice of Yoda and Miss Piggy, has settled into the director's chair quite frequently in his career, even dabbling in comedy on occasion. At the helm of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, he paired Steve Martin and Michael Caine to comedic effect, ditto Martin and Eddie Murphy in Bowfinger. Death at a Funeral sees him working without stars, but the comedy doesn't really seem to suffer.

The film begins with a very funny gag involving the opening of a casket, not the easiest moment in life from which to wring humor. With it, we are introduced to Daniel (Matthew MacFayden), who is about to bury his father. With the aid of his wife Jane (Keeley Hawes) he must accommodate a gaggle of guests pre-loaded with neuroses.

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Millions Review


Excellent
You're a preteen growing up in the United Kingdom, and you just stumbled upon the loot from a bank robbery. What do you do? Tell your father? Keep it a secret? Contact the police? Give it to charity? Go shopping? Well, whatever you're going to do -- be fast, because in less than a week, the UK is switching to the euro, which will render the money useless.

Welcome to the dilemma in which Damien (Alexander Nathan Etel) and Anthony (Lewis Owen McGibbon) find themselves after moving to a developing British subdivision with their father (James Nesbitt) shortly after their mother passes away. Damien discovers the loot one afternoon as he watches trains pass while inside his homemade cardboard box hut. A spiritual young lad obsessed with famous saints, Damien believes the money is a gift from God; therefore, he wants to give it to charities and poor people. When Anthony finds out about the money, however, he has other ideas for the money...

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Millions Review


OK

Director Danny Boyle is known for wildly imaginative visualsin innovative, gritty-cool movies about murderers ("Shallow Grave"),junkies ("Trainspotting")and zombies ("28 Days Later"), so what's he doing makinga sweet, sentimental kids' movie? Virtually reinventing another genre,of course.

In "Millions," an angel-faced 7-year-old Irishboy named Damian (Alexander Nathan Etel) finds a duffle bag full of bankrobbery loot, but thanks to his youthful naivete, his faith in saints thatwatch over him, his run-away imagination and the fact that the bag literallyfell from the sky, he assumes the booty is a gift from God.

"Who else has that kind of money?" he asks innocentlyof his more practical 9-year-old brother, who wants to keep the discoveryhush-hush and invest in real estate. But altruistic Damian sets about ona mission: He resolves to help the poor, excitedly buying pizza for homelessteenagers, secretly stuffing cash in the mailbox of austere-living Mormonneighbors, and anonymously donating £1,000 to an African charity fund atschool.

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