Craig Lucas

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Craig Lucas, Max von Essen, Leanne Cope, Christopher Wheeldon and Robert Fairchild - Opening night for An American in Paris at the Palace Theatre - Curtain Call. at Palace Theatre,, Palace Theatre - New York City, New York, United States - Sunday 12th April 2015

Craig Lucas, Max Von Essen, Leanne Cope, Christopher Wheeldon and Robert Fairchild
Natasha Katz, Jill Paice, Craig Lucas, Max Von Essen, Leanne Cope, Christopher Wheeldon and Robert Fairchild
Craig Lucas, Max Von Essen, Leanne Cope, Christopher Wheeldon and Robert Fairchild

Craig Lucas and Frankie Krainz - Opening night after party for An American in Paris at The Pierre Hotel - Arrivals. at Palace Theatre, - New York City, New York, United States - Sunday 12th April 2015

Craig Lucas and Frankie Krainz
Craig Lucas
Craig Lucas
Craig Lucas and Frankie Krainz

Craig Lucas, Rob Fisher, Robert Fairchild, Leanne Cope, Brandon Uranowitz, Max von Essen, Jill Paice, Christopher Wheeldon and Veanne Cox - Meet and greet with the cast of An American In Paris at the New 42nd Street Studios. at New 42nd Street Studios, - New York, New York, United States - Wednesday 11th February 2015

Craig Lucas, Rob Fisher, Robert Fairchild, Leanne Cope, Brandon Uranowitz, Max Von Essen, Jill Paice, Christopher Wheeldon and Veanne Cox
Christopher Wheeldon and Craig Lucas
Craig Lucas, Robert Fairchild, Leanne Cope and Christopher Wheeldon
Craig Lucas, Veanne Cox, Robert Fairchild, Leanne Cope, Brandon Uranowitz, Max Von Essen, Jill Paice and Christopher Wheeldon
Craig Lucas

Craig Lucas - Monday 24th August 2009 at Central Park New York City, USA

Craig Lucas

Craig Lucas - Tuesday 17th June 2008 at Central Park New York City, USA

Craig Lucas

The Dying Gaul Review


Good
In 1995, the internet was still a strange, scary destination for most Americans, a primary meeting place for pornography hounds and other assorted lonely creeps who sought out the thrilling anonymity of the web's myriad chat rooms. Based on one of his plays, Craig Lucas' (The Secret Lives of Dentists, Prelude to a Kiss) directorial debut The Dying Gaul is fascinated with the dangerous allure of these online social venues, which provide users with identity secrecy and, thus, the means to express taboo fantasies (and deal with emotionally corrosive issues) from the comfort and safety of home. Part movie industry critique and part Greek tragedy, Lucas' film charts the modem-enabled turmoil between a married Tinsletown power couple and an aspiring gay screenwriter in the luxurious Hollywood hills, a trio whose interpersonal dynamic is irreparably disrupted thanks to the nasty role-playing opportunities afforded by computers. Yet with its story of rampant duplicity and showbiz shallowness tied to a now technologically outdated mid-'90s milieu, and with its satire weighed down by banality, The Dying Gaul seems relevant only insofar as its cast effectively pinpoints the vengeful malice born from spurned love and squandered trust.

Jeffrey (Campbell Scott) is a bottom line-driven producer interested in Robert's (Peter Sarsgaard) script "The Dying Gaul," a semi-autobiographical tale about AIDS based on his relationship with his now-dead agent and partner Malcolm (Bill Camp). However, to make the project commercially viable, Jeffrey demands that Robert change the central couple from a homosexual to heterosexual duo. Jettisoning his integrity, Robert sells out and does as Jeffrey asks, in the process pocketing $1 million and establishing a close-knit friendship with Jeffrey and his failed screenwriter wife Elaine (Patricia Clarkson), whose life is so purposeless that learning how to control her multi-million dollar house's blinds constitutes an exciting afternoon. Yet the happy threesome's relationship is soon torn asunder when, after learning that Robert frequents chat rooms, Elaine strikes up an in-disguise online conversation with her new friend and learns that he's having an affair with Jeffrey. This devastating discovery frighteningly undercuts Elaine's sense of security and stability while also igniting a desire for retribution, leading to a dangerous game of cyberspace cat-and-mouse in which Elaine poses as the back-from-the-dead spirit of Malcolm and, ultimately, each character's true, less-than-savory personalities are drawn out into the blinding L.A. light of day.

Continue reading: The Dying Gaul Review

The Secret Lives Of Dentists Review


Excellent
Can vomit be nominated Best Supporting Actor? Best Supporting Actress? Is puke gendered? Regardless, the stuff plays an essential role in The Secret Lives of Dentists. David Hurst (Campbell Scott) is emotionally sick with paranoia about whether his wife and fellow dentist Dana (Hope Davis) is having an affair. And then, he's quite literally sick, laid low with a case of the flu that spreads to Dana and his three young daughters over the course of five wearying, nauseous days. The stress and fear that takes hold of David in that time makes for the best movie about marital strife this side of American Beauty. However much director Alan Rudolph budgeted for creamed corn, it was worth every penny.

Dentists (adapted from Jane Smiley's novel The Age of Grief) opens with a brisk, gorgeously rendered sequence where David spies Dana being caressed lovingly by an unknown gentleman before she takes the stage in a small-town production of the opera Nabucco. As Verdi blares, David's mind swims. We rush through their romance in grainy flashbacks: Falling in love in dental school, starting a practice together, raising three daughters, and buying a weekend cabin in upstate New York. Scott, who's an expert at roles where he plays the well-meaning victim of circumstance, is excellent here. Subtly, he captures the way that wronged, anti-social people speak: Speaking a bit too loud to Dana, you can feel him studying her for evidence of sin. His eyes - and the camera - study her legs and the hem of her skirt, wondering what her sexual needs might be.

Continue reading: The Secret Lives Of Dentists Review

Craig Lucas

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Craig Lucas Movies

The Dying Gaul Movie Review

The Dying Gaul Movie Review

In 1995, the internet was still a strange, scary destination for most Americans, a primary...

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