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Fantastic Beasts And Where to Find Them Trailer


Long before Harry Potter - or his parents - took up residence at Hogwarts, there was a student called Newt Scamander. An inquisitive boy who was constantly on the lookout for new magical creatures found himself being expelled from the school for endangering the lives of the pupils. Though Newt was expelled for his actions, a certain teacher going by the name of Albus Dumbledore stuck up for the young wizard.

Continue: Fantastic Beasts And Where to Find Them Trailer

Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them - Teaser Trailer


Long before the time of Harry Potter, wizards and witches still lived their lives in the muggle world as well as the wizarding world that was still governed by the ministry of magic.

Even though 'he who shall not be named' wasn't causing chaos for the wizards, they still had problems of their own. Largely these were monsters and beasts that come from far and distant lands. Newt Scamander is one particular wizard who is fascinated by these creators and when a selection of these terrible beasts are mistakenly released into the muggle world, Newt finds himself suddenly thrown into untrodden territory.

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them was originally written as a book by JK Rowling. The book studies 83 of these mystical creators all of which Newt has discovered.

Continue: Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them - Teaser Trailer

'True Detective' Season 2 Debuts Eerie, Slick Trailer


Colin Farrell

The first teaser trailer for True Detective season 2 has premiered online, with Colin Farrell taking center stage as the compromised detective Ray Velcoro. The first season of the show was a monster hit, with Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson turning in stellar performances to compliment Nic Pizzolatto's taut script.

True DetectiveColin Farrell plays detective Ray Velcoro in True Detective season 2

Season two stars co-stars Vince Vaughn as Frank Semyon, a criminal and entrepreneur in danger of losing his life's work. Rachel McAdams plays Ani Bezzerides, a Ventura County Sheriff's detective at odds with the system she serves, while Taylor Kitsch plays a war veteran and motorcycle cop for the California Highway Patrol who discovers a crime scene which triggers an investigation involving three law enforcement groups.

Continue reading: 'True Detective' Season 2 Debuts Eerie, Slick Trailer

Colin Farrell - Irish actor Colin Farrell and Canadian actress Rachel McAdams were snapped on the set of 'True Detectives' along with co-star Taylor Kitsch in downtown Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 10th February 2015

Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell

Rachel McAdams and Colin Farrell - Filming 'True Detectives' in downtown Los Angeles - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 9th February 2015

Rachel Mcadams and Colin Farrell
Rachel Mcadams
Rachel Mcadams
Rachel Mcadams
Rachel Mcadams
Rachel Mcadams

So, "True Detective" Season 2 Will Star Colin Farrell And Vince Vaughn. Who's Next?


Vince Vaughn Colin Farrell

Another one of those True Detective rumours has been confirmed – Vince Vaughn has indeed signed on for a part in the show’s second season. HBO confirmed that news that Vaughn and Colin Farrell will co-star in the brand new story that Nic Pizzolatto and co. are working on. There’s a twist though – Vaughn and Farrell will not join forces onscreen, a la Rust and Marty. Instead, Vaughn will play the criminal to Farrell’s cop character. Irish actor Farrell, 38, will star as compromised detective Ray Velcoro and Vaughn, 44, will star as criminal mastermind Frank Semyon in the drama’s next run.

Vince Vaughn
Vaughn fits in with True Detective's strategy of casting older, established film actors, which helped the first season's popularity.

Specifically, the latter will take on the role of a “career criminal in danger of losing his empire when his move into legitimate enterprise is upended by the murder of a business partner” – description courtesy of HBO’s statement, via Entertainment Weekly.

Continue reading: So, "True Detective" Season 2 Will Star Colin Farrell And Vince Vaughn. Who's Next?

Finally, We've Got A Plot For 'True Detective' Season 2 (and Vince Vaughn)


Vince Vaughn Colin Farrell

After months of rumors, speculation and a drip-feed of information for Nic Pizzolato and individuals connected with HBO, we've finally got some solid information on what we can expect from 'True Detective' season 2. Filming is set to go ahead in October, with Colin Farrell and Vince Vaughn the most high profile stars.

Matthew McConaugheyColin Farrell will take the reigns from Matthew McConaughey on 'True Detective' season 2

According to a new HBO press release - which confirmed both actors for the roles - the plot will revolve around a murder that police officers and a criminal must navigate around for their own sake. We now know that Farrell will play Ray Velcoro, a "compromised detective whose allegiances are torn between his masters in a corrupt police department and the mobster who owns him," while Vaughn has been cast Frank Semyon, "a career criminal in danger of losing his empire when his move into legitimate enterprise is upended by the murder of a business partner."

Continue reading: Finally, We've Got A Plot For 'True Detective' Season 2 (and Vince Vaughn)

Colin Farrell Confirms He's In 'True Detective' Season 2, "I'm So Excited"


Colin Farrell

Irish actor Colin Farrell has confirmed he will star in the second season of HBO's 'True Detective', ending months of speculation that linked the likes of Brad Pitt and Christian Bale with the role. Speaking to Ireland's Sunday World, Farrell said: "I'm doing the second series. I'm so excited."

Colin FarrellColin Farrell is in True Detective season 2

The news won't come as a huge surprise to fans that have followed the rumors. Back in July, The Wrap reported that Farrell was "in talks" for a key role in the series and that he was likely to be joined by Taylor Kitsch and Vince Vaughn.

Continue reading: Colin Farrell Confirms He's In 'True Detective' Season 2, "I'm So Excited"

With Matthew McConaughey's Story Done "True Detective" Casts Colin Farrell For Second Season


Colin Farrell Matthew Mcconaughey Taylor Kitsch Vince Vaughn Elizabeth Moss

Big news, True Detective fans! The latest cast announcement from HBO’s runaway hit is that Colin Farrell will join the lineup starting next season. Farrell made the announcement himself, saying he was “so excited” about the role in an exclusive for Sunday World, an Irish newspaper.

Colin Farrell
Meet your new True Detective star.

For the second season, Farrell will find himself in the midst of a whole new plot alongside an entirely different cast. With the conclusion of the plot from season one, showrunner Nick Pizzolotto has crafted an entirely new story for True Detective’s next outing. Rumors have been flying around about the show’s possible new stars, but Farrell is the first confirmed actor to join the show.

Continue reading: With Matthew McConaughey's Story Done "True Detective" Casts Colin Farrell For Second Season

True Detective Has Solid TCA Awards Show Off The Back Of Season 2 Rumours


Matthew Mcconaughey Colin Farrell

Having just processed the latest True Detective season 2 plot rumors, we saw the show pick up the TCA award for Best Miniseries (Emmy rules don’t apply), while Matthew Mcconaughey walked away with the male acting gong. Scroll down for the full list of winners. 

Matthew McConaughey True DetectiveMatthew McConaughey stars as Rust Cohle in True Detective

He beat out Bryan Cranston who polished of the role of a lifetime as Walter White in Breaking Bad’s fifth season. But McConaughey’s 8-episode stint as Rustin Cohle, the lone wanderer prone to existential mumblings, didn’t surprise anyone, such is the quality of writing on HBO’s hauntingly gothic miniseries.

Continue reading: True Detective Has Solid TCA Awards Show Off The Back Of Season 2 Rumours

A Week In Movies: On Set With The Hunger Games, Howard Hughes And The Lobster; New Trailers For Expendables 3 And Ninja Turtles


Jennifer Lawrence Lily Collins Matthew Broderick Warren Beatty Rachel Weisz Colin Farrell Sylvester Stallone Megan Fox Jeff Bridges Meryl Streep Michael Fassbender

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2

In Paris, Jennifer Lawrence was caught on camera as she shot scenes for The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2 involving a huge crowd of elaborately costumed extras. The hotly anticipated Mockingjay Part 1 opens this coming November, with Part 2 coming in 2015. Check out photos from 'The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2' film set in Paris - May 2014.

Meanwhile in Los Angeles, Warren Beatty was shooting his new Howard Hughes movie out on the streets where photographers caught Matthew Broderick and a glammed-up Lily Collins at work. The still-untitled film centres on an affair the elderly Hughes (played by Beatty) had with a younger woman. Costars include Annette Bening, Martin Sheen, Alden Ehrenreich, Brooklyn Decker, Oliver Platt and Candice Bergen. The film will be out next year. Take a look at the photos of Lily Collins and Matthew Broderick prep for filming 'Untitled Warren Beatty Project' - May 2014.

Continue reading: A Week In Movies: On Set With The Hunger Games, Howard Hughes And The Lobster; New Trailers For Expendables 3 And Ninja Turtles

Lea Seydoux and Colin Farrell - Colin Farrell on the set of Giorgos Lanthimos movie 'The Lobster' shooting in Co. Kerry alongside actors John C Reilly and Lea Seydoux - Kerry, Ireland - Tuesday 15th April 2014

Lea Seydoux and Colin Farrell
Lea Seydoux and Colin Farrell
Lea Seydoux and Colin Farrell

Jessica Brown Findlay and Colin Farrell - UK premiere of "A New York Winter's Tale" held at The Odeon Kensington - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 13th February 2014

Jessica Brown Findlay and Colin Farrell
Jessica Brown Findlay
Jessica Brown Findlay and Colin Farrell

Colin Farrell - Colin Farrell leaves the BBC - London, United Kingdom - Friday 14th February 2014

Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell

Colin Farrell and Jessica Brown Findlay - A New York Winter's Tale U.K. Premiere - Arrivals - London, Ukraine - Thursday 13th February 2014

Colin Farrell and Jessica Brown Findlay
Colin Farrell and Jessica Brown Findlay
Colin Farrell and Jessica Brown Findlay
Colin Farrell and Jessica Brown Findlay
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell

Jeffrey Hayden, Eva Marie Saint and Colin Farrell - World Premiere of 'Winter's Tale' held at the Ziegfeld Theatre - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Wednesday 12th February 2014

Jeffrey Hayden, Eva Marie Saint and Colin Farrell

Eve Marie Saint and Colin Farrell - World premiere of "Winter's Tale at the Ziegfeld Theater - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 11th February 2014

Eve Marie Saint and Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Eve Marie Saint and Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Eve Marie Saint and Colin Farrell

Colin Farrell - 71st Annual Golden Globe Awards held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 12th January 2014

Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell and Claudine Farrell
Colin Farrell and Claudine Farrell
Colin Farrell and Claudine Farrell
Colin Farrell and Claudine Farrell

Colin Farrell - Variety's Creative Impact Awards And 10 Directors to Watch Brunch Presented By Mercedes-Benz At The 25th Annual Palm Springs International Film Festival - Palm Springs, California, United States - Sunday 5th January 2014

Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell

Colin Farrell and Ewan McGregor - 25th Anniversary Palm Springs International Film Festival held at the Palm Springs Convention Center - Arrivals - California, United States - Saturday 4th January 2014

Colin Farrell and Ewan Mcgregor
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell

Sharon Osbourne Give Us WAY Too Much Information About Her Cosmetic Surgery Procedures


Sharon Osbourne Graham Norton Colin Farrell

Sharon Osbourne isn't exactly known for being closed off or unwilling to delve into her private life and when she appeared on the BBC's The Graham Norton Show earlier this week, Sharon lived up to her billing as an open book. Discussing plastic surgery procedures, Sharon revealed that she has been under the knife, but not necessarily where you'd expect the knife to go.

Sharon Osbourne
Sharon is no stranger to the plastic surgeon's knife

Osbourne was a guest on the show on Friday, 29 November, with the interview going to air on 7 December. Whilst on the show, Osbourne was complimented on her looks by host Graham Norton when she revealed that she is no stranger to the surgeon's scalpel. Admitting to having gone under the knife to keep her youthful looks, Sharon went on to explain that she has also had a few other procedures done, including having her "vagina tightened."

Continue reading: Sharon Osbourne Give Us WAY Too Much Information About Her Cosmetic Surgery Procedures

Colin Farrell - Colin Farrell at the BBC Radio 1 studios - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 28th November 2013

Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell

Colin Farrell - Celebrities leave The Hollywood Foreign Press Association & InStyle's Miss Golden Globe event - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 21st November 2013

Colin Farrell

Colin Farrell - The Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) And InStyle 2014 Miss Golden Globe Announcement/Celebration At Fig & Olive - West Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 22nd November 2013

Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell

Colin Farrell - AFI FEST 2013 Presented By Audi - Disney's "Saving Mr. Banks" Opening Night Gala Premiere At TCL Chinese Theatre - Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 8th November 2013

Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell

Warcraft Movie Update: Colin Farrell And Paula Patton Handed Leads?


Colin Farrell Paula Patton

It’s pretty simple: if millions upon millions of people are playing a videogame, it’s time to push the envelope and turn that videogame into a film. The franchise is developing nicely, and Deadline has reported that a cast is beginning to assemble, with Colin Farrell and Paula Patton heading it up.

Colin FarrellIs Farrell mulling over a role in Warcraft?

According to the ever-reliable film site, Farrell has been offered the role, but it’s not certain whether he’ll accept or not. In fact, sources have suggested that the chances of him adopting the role are 50/50. Director Duncan Jones is reportedly testing out other high-profile stars in case his first choice doesn’t bite.

Continue reading: Warcraft Movie Update: Colin Farrell And Paula Patton Handed Leads?

Video - Colin Farrell Says In An Interview He Felt 'Less Discomfort' Seeing Himself In The Animated Movie 'Epic' As Opposed To A Live Action Movie


Colin Farrell talks about what it's like to make the transition from live action to animated film with his new movie 'Epic' in an interview during the movie's premiere.

Continue: Video - Colin Farrell Says In An Interview He Felt 'Less Discomfort' Seeing Himself In The Animated Movie 'Epic' As Opposed To A Live Action Movie

Christopher Walken, Honey Boo Boo – Is This The World’s Weirdest Pairing?


Christopher Walken Sam Rockwell Colin Farrell Alana Thompson

Christopher Walken’s Honey Boo Boo reading has caused a bit of a stir.

Stars of the new comedy Seven Psychopaths Christopher Walken, Colin Farrell and Sam Rockwell have brought a whole new dimension to the latest reality star to take America by storm, Honey Boo Boo.

Whilst filming a press junket interview for the actor’s new film, the trio of stars were asked to read lines from a mock-audition for the Honey Boo Boo Movie, with all exceeding in their roles. The show, which airs on The Learning Channel, teaches viewers how a Georgian family go about their daily lives and struggles, with the actors reciting some awe-inspiring lines lifted directly from the show including: “My momma has told me in the past that if you fart 12-15 times a day, you could lose a lot of weight, so I think I'm gonna lose a lot of weight.”

Continue reading: Christopher Walken, Honey Boo Boo – Is This The World’s Weirdest Pairing?

Seven Psychopaths Trailer


Marty is a budding screenwriter in LA with hopes of completing his major screenplay 'Seven Psychopaths' but involuntarily gets mixed up in his friends Hans and Billy's career of dog kidnapping; a way of earning money that involves stealing people's pet pooches and returning them some days later to claim the reward. Billy is an actor and Marty's best friend who tries desperately to keep him safe when he is almost killed after Billy and Hans steal the much-loved Shih Tzu of unhinged gangster, Charlie; a man whose fury and devastation at losing his dog is enough drive to execute whoever he thinks is involved. Hans is religious with a violent past but now recognises non-violence as a better way to live. However, he, Billy and Marty will struggle avoiding violence at the hands of Charlie especially as they choose to ignore their worried and annoyed girlfriends' suggestions to return the dog.

'Seven Psychopaths' is a wonderful crime comedy that spoofs the trend of all the serious gangster movies that have been released this year. Directed, written and produced by the Oscar winning Martin Mcdonagh ('In Bruges', 'Six Shooter'), this star-studded flick is definitely one for dog lovers and gangster film lovers alike. It is scheduled for release in the UK this winter on December 7th 2012.

Starring: Sam Rockwell, Colin Farrell, Christopher Walken, Woody Harrelson, Abbie Cornish, Olga Kurylenko, Zeljko Ivanek, Tom Waits, Helena Mattsson, Gabourey Sidibe, Kevin Corrigan, Brendan Sexton III, Sandy Martin and Ronnie Gene Blevins.

Fright Night Trailer


High school nerd Charley Brewster is in his senior year of high school and dating the popular beautiful British exchange student, Amy. When fellow classmate Adam Johnson goes missing, Charley isn't bothered by this - Adam is most likely skipping class, in his opinion. But his best friend, 'Evil' Ed, is concerned.

Continue: Fright Night Trailer

Video - Colin Farrell Meets Fans Before Letterman Taping


Colin Farrell, the Irish actor and star of recent comedy 'Horrible Bosses', arriving at the Ed Sullivan Theatre in New York for a taping of The Late Show with David Letterman. Wearing a casual grey cardigan with white shirt and grey trousers, the actor signed posters for fans before heading inside the famous theatre.

Farrell is currently filming Len Wiseman's remake of the action sci-fi 'Total Recall', originally starring Arnold Schwarzenegger. The actor plays a factory worker who begins to suspect he is a spy

Horrible Bosses Review


Good
More amusing than hilarious, this silly comedy at least has moments that make us laugh out loud as its plot gets increasingly ridiculous. And the solid cast members really throw themselves into each scene.

Nick, Kurt and Dale (Bateman, Sudeikis and Day) are three friends who like their jobs but are tormented by their evil bosses (Spacey, Farrell and Aniston, respectively). When they decide they can't take any more abuse, they decide to do something drastic, hiring an inner-city hitman (Foxx) with an unprintable name and then trying to find key information about their bosses that they can use to bump them off. And of course nothing goes to even their pathetic attempt at a plan.

Continue reading: Horrible Bosses Review

The Way Back Review


Very Good
Based on real events that are outrageously inspiring, this epic-style movie is packed with emotion and adventure, although it also feels a little overlong and meandering, mainly due to the narrative itself.

In 1939 Poland, Janusz (Sturgess) is charged by the Soviets with spying and sent to a Siberian gulag. In the middle of the bitter winter, he and six other prisoners manage to escape: veteran American (Harris), hothead Russian criminal (Farrell), helpful comic (Bucur), artist (Potodean), nice-guy Latvian (Skarsgard) and night-blind youngster (Urzendowsky). The first 300 miles to Lake Baikal almost kills them, but they've only just begun the 4,000-mile trek to freedom in India. And they've also picked up a young Polish girl (Ronan).

Continue reading: The Way Back Review

The Way Back Trailer


For anyone in the 1940 being held prisoner in a Siberian gulag they knew their lives might not last much longer, when seven inmates hatch -and successfully carry out - a plan to escape under the cover of a blizzard they do not know what their next move will be. Surrounded by unforgiving terrain and traitorous weather conditions, the group decide their only hope is to walk to safety.

Continue: The Way Back Trailer

Crazy Heart Review


Very Good
Like Tender Mercies, which won an Oscar for producer-costar Duvall, this film feels like the cherry on top of Jeff Bridges' fine career, giving him a terrific character who carries us through a fairly straightforward story of regret and redemption.

Bad Blake (Bridges) is a successful 57-year-old musician whose career and personal life have been derailed by alcoholism. Playing to bowling alleys and bars across New Mexico, he's interviewed by a journalist Jean (Gyllenhaal) and is surprised when a spark of attraction develops between them. His next stop is Phoenix, where he plays a gig with former band member Tommy Sweet (Farrell), who's now a mega-star but hasn't forgotten the debt he owes to Bad. The question is whether Bad can get himself together long enough to make either relationship work.

Continue reading: Crazy Heart Review

Ondine Trailer


Watch the trailer for Ondine

Continue: Ondine Trailer

The Imaginarium Of Doctor Parnassus Review


Very Good
Returning to the florid visual style of Time Bandits and The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, Gilliam takes us on a whimsical flight through his imagination with this scruffy, messy movie. The plot doesn't really hang together, but the cast and imagery are magical.

Travelling showman Parnassus (Plummer) performs on the backstreets of London with his lively troupe: his elfin daughter Valentina (Cole), the eager Anton (Garfield) and the tiny Percy (Troyer). One night they encounter an amnesiac, Tony (Ledger), who joins the gang and suggests modernising the show to attract a better audience. What Tony doesn't know is that Parnassus has made a pact with the devilish Nick (Waits), buying immortality in exchange for Valentina's soul on her 16th birthday, which is coming soon. And Tony has some secrets as well.

Continue reading: The Imaginarium Of Doctor Parnassus Review

The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus Trailer


Watch the trailer for The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus

Continue: The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus Trailer

Pride And Glory Review


Excellent
Police thrillers these days aspire to replicate the CSI formula on the big screen. Not Pride and Glory. It wants to be this generation's Serpico.

Director Gavin O'Connor certainly understands the difference between the two. Though Glory lays out a complex yet solvable mystery, it's far more interested in loyalty and the familial bonds that exist among lifetime police officers. It also wears its adoration for the badge -- and those who wear it -- on its sleeve.

Continue reading: Pride And Glory Review

In Bruges Review


Excellent
The Bruges Chamber of Commerce should be delighted with at least part of Martin McDonagh's film In Bruges, as it provides an unprecedented and absolutely ravishing look at the architecture of this gorgeous Belgian town that appears to have been dropped into the 21st century from a pristine, fairy-tale version of the Middle Ages. They should be happy as a good number of people, after seeing the film, will be tempted to hop on the next flight to the little jewel box of a medieval village, all canals and pristinely preserved Gothic architecture. Such town boosters will be less delighted with other aspects of this dark-as-night comedy, in which a pair of hitmen hiding out in the town spend their time arguing over whether or not the town is, in fact, "a shithole." Later on, the guns come out, large quantities of blood are spilled, and a story that had been weaving a fairy-tale ambience up until that point turns into an entirely different kind of fairy tale -- one that doesn't exactly cater to tourists.

Writer/director McDonagh has dabbled in fairy tales before, in his grimly funny and ultraviolent stage plays like the Tarantino-esque The Lieutenant of Inishmore and, particularly, The Pillowman, which knocked Broadway audiences for a loop back in 2005 with its mix of bloody, Grimm-like Germanic storytelling and anonymous, Kafkaesque modernity. With his feature directorial debut (his short film, Six Shooter, won an Oscar in 2006), McDonagh takes his particular theatrical affinity for finding cockeyed laughs in horrendous situations and creates a precisely structured and knock-you-down hilarious comedy of violence with a film that (hopefully) announces a great new cinematic talent.

Continue reading: In Bruges Review

Cassandra's Dream Review


Excellent
Woody Allen's Hannah and Her Sisters culminates with a warm and fuzzy Thanksgiving dinner scene where all the inner and outer relationship problems plaguing the angst-ridden characters in the film are happily resolved and familial ties are reaffirmed; a tiny beam of light in Allen's dark and bleak tunnel of life. And ever since Hannah and Her Sisters, Allen has been renouncing that happy ending in every film he's made... but never more so than in his two recent dramas, Match Point, and now, Cassandra's Dream (Allen's 42nd film as writer/director).

Cassandra's Dream is Allen's most grim and uncomfortable film to date, surpassing even Crimes and Misdemeanors and Match Point. At least in those films the upper class criminals get away with their deeds and get on with their lives (however psychically diminished those lives may be). Not so in Cassandra's Dream, where two lower-middle-class brothers commit a dark crime (almost a British translation of Before the Devil Knows You're Dead) that not only shatters their humanity but also destroys their family ties and much more.

Continue reading: Cassandra's Dream Review

Ask The Dust Review


Weak
If Robert Towne's Ask the Dust is the end result of 30 years of labor to bring John Fante's celebrated novel to the screen, it gravely calls into question Towne's current abilities as both a screenwriter and director. Towne's adaptation sheds no new interpretive light on Ask the Dust's literary legacy, and, even on its own terms, this is an anemic romance, undone by awkward performances and flat-footed filmmaking.

Twenty-year-old aspiring Italian-American writer Arturo Bandini, Fante's literary alter ego, is brash yet sensitive, fundamentally moral yet driven by an unquenchable, uniquely American thirst for love, lust, and romantic adventure. Bandini's conflicting values jolt and jostle inside him, finding expression primarily through Bandini's typewriter, as he tries to alchemize his experiences into fiction.

Continue reading: Ask The Dust Review

The New World Review


Good
Is there a more frustrating living director than Terrence Malick? It's hard to imagine another filmmaker more fantastically talented or more jaw-dropping awful, capable of conjuring scenes of breathtaking cinematic poetry and cringing adolescent pathos within mere seconds of each other. There is nobody in the modern world of cinema even remotely like the ineffable artist who is Malick - but whether that's a good or bad thing is for wiser heads to puzzle out.

Malick ended the silence which followed his fantastic 1970s one-two punch of Badlands and Days of Heaven - airy, wind-swept paeans to wide-open skies and the loneliness that lies like a bruise on the land beneath them - with 1998's star-stuffed adaptation of James Jones' battle epic The Thin Red Line. It would have been the World War II movie to end the century with, but for a little something called Saving Private Ryan, out that same year. Up against Ryan's self-consciously stomach-churning gore and herky-jerky camerawork, not to mention its resolutely action, action, ACTION! pacing, Malick's moony meditation on the thin line (if any) between civilization and savagery couldn't help but come off as impossibly arch. Never mind that Malick's battle scenes were even more vicious and realistic than Spielberg's, given their eschewing of comforting action film tropes in favor of pure hot chaos. A strike (well, several strikes) against Malick was his habit of telling the story via overlapping voiceovers, as each of the characters thinks Big Important Thoughts about life and war and love. By jettisoning Jones' pungent prose, all the characters ended up sounding exactly the same, like Malick just thinking aloud in the sort of white-noise pseudo-philosophical jumble that Godard litters his films with.

Continue reading: The New World Review

The War Zone Review


Weak
Incest. Treachery. Betrayal. Videotape.

No, I'm not talking about the new version of Hamlet. I'm talking about The War Zone, a 21st century Kitchen Sink drama helmed by Brit actor-who-should-stay-an-actor Tim Roth.

Continue reading: The War Zone Review

Hart's War Review


Extraordinary
I must admit I had preconceived notions regarding Hart's War. I was expecting to see a blood-and-guts WWII P.O.W. flick with Bruce Willis kicking Nazi butt, just like Audie Murphy. Instead, I was pleasantly surprised by this strange mixture of The Verdict and The Great Escape that delivers on all fronts, with a cunning script, great acting, and subtle directing.

The story resembles one of those studio pictures of the 1940s and 1950s made famous by the likes of William Holden and Gary Cooper. Willis plays Col. William McNamara, the highest-ranking officer in German prisoner camp Stalag IV during the tail end of the WWII. McNamara retains the dignity of his fellow American soldiers held captive and silently plans to strike back against the enemy under the suspicious eyes of German Col. Werner Visser (Marcel Iures). When a murder occurs in the camp, McNamara sets in motion a plan of attack against his German counterparts by orchestrating a court martial headed by Lt. Tommy Hart (Colin Farrell), an Army desk jockey with a senator for a father who was recently captured in Belgium. As the tensions mount and sides are taken, both friend and foe uncover duplicities within their own ranks, values of lives are weighed against the duties of soldiers, and the question of honor versus freedom plays out to the final whopper of an ending.

Continue reading: Hart's War Review

Intermission Review


Very Good
Intermission, a gritty ensemble comedy about a bunch of gritty Irish folk, bears some resemblance to late-nineties indie crimedies like Trainspotting, Go, and Lock, Stock & Two Smoking Barrels, and fans of those movies should certainly check this one out--it's practically made for those "if you liked [that], check out [this]" shelves at the video store.

What Intermission resembles just as handily, though, is an Irish Love Actually, which is to say it's like Love Actually with a lot more drinking and violence. This is unlikely to placate anyone who truly hated Love Actually and, as such, would require something on the order of a soccer riot to feel fully cleansed. But if you (like me) merely thought a few of those charmingly stammering Englishmen could use a good deck, Intermission is the punch-throwing, rock-chucking romantic comedy for you.

Continue reading: Intermission Review

American Outlaws Review


Bad
Not so long ago, men by the names of Peckinpah, Ford, Leone, and Eastwood made westerns. Real westerns. These were some of the best films of the twentieth century.

Those days are gone. Now we have crap like Wild Wild West to pass for the western. And that record is not improved with the unbearable tale of American Outlaws.

Continue reading: American Outlaws Review

The Recruit Review


Good
Rarely do I have any trouble coming up with a way to lead into a movie review. But The Recruit has really thrown me a puzzle. Do I say something about its slick Hollywood production values and typically over-the-top performance by Al Pacino? Do I comment on its wealth of technical implausibilities? Or should I say something about how you should never trust a redhead, newbie spy James's (Colin Farrell) first obvious mistake in the film?

None of these leads really grabbed me, but then again, neither did The Recruit. It's a glossy and well-massaged thriller, designed to give you two hours of eye candy and gently massage your brain -- but not too much! After all, a fickle mass audience might be weighing their investment against the simplicity of Kangaroo Jack.

Continue reading: The Recruit Review

Veronica Guerin Review


Very Good
Before we even get into talking about Veronica Guerin, one thing needs to be made abundantly clear: Cate Blanchett is most likely the greatest actress working in film today. Like pretty much every other performance she has given, Ms. Blanchett (how long it will be before she becomes Dame Blanchett?) buries herself so thoroughly in her role here as a real-life crusading Irish journalist that one wonders how she could ever dig herself out again. As for the movie, it's essentially a vehicle for Blanchett's tour de force performance, and while that's not always a great thing (there are several wasted opportunities in the film) it's not necessarily a bad thing (it stays the hell out of her way).

And from the looks of it, everyone stayed out of Veronica Guerin's way. The real Guerin (her story was previously made as the morose When the Sky Falls, starring Joan Allen) was a star columnist for Dublin's Sunday Independent in the 1990s who decided to start writing about the gangsters behind the explosion of drug trade sweeping across the city. As presented by Blanchett, Guerin was a pretty fearsome, fearless creature, not afraid to simply walk into Dublin's worst slums, stepping over the syringes carpeting the ground, and start asking questions of the junkies and even the dealers. She has a convenient stool pigeon in arch-criminal John "The Coach" Traynor (the marvelous Ciarán Hinds), whom she treats as an underworld rock star of sorts in her column, in exchange for information. It's an education in charm just watching Blanchett stalk into a room, fix on the person she needs to get something out of, be it The Coach, a friendly police detective, or even a member of Parliament, and just about always get what she wants. She's like a bulldozer in a sharp suit. And when Dublin's worst start pressuring her to back off the story - a fist to the face, a bullet through the window of her study - it just adds fuel to the fire.

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Minority Report Review


Extraordinary
Per Minority Report, in only 52 years we'll have a new privacy nightmare on our hands: A police unit in Washington D.C. will genetically engineer three people, float them in a Jacuzzi, and hook wires up to their heads so the cops can see murders occurring in the future. And thus, they can arrest the perpetrators before they commit the crime. (I would say this is a nightmare of an idea... but then again, we are talking about Washington D.C....)

The premise is a mind-bending puzzle on the scale of Memento, courtesy of sci-fi legend Steven Spielberg and his first collaboration with a stellar Tom Cruise. It's also Spielberg's best work since 1993's Schindler's List and flirts with threatening Blade Runner and A Clockwork Orange as the best paradoxical utopic/dystopic view of the future.

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Daredevil Review


Weak
In the Marvel Comics food chain, Matt Murdock and his alter ego Daredevil falls somewhere between the wise-cracking Spider-Man and the washed up Submariner. An underdog hero born of vengeance, Daredevil never achieved the superstar status afforded the Incredible Hulk or the X-Men. Instead, he steadily built a dedicated core of cult fanatics who empathized with the crime fighter and related to his character-driven adventures.

It's those same sympathetic souls who'll most appreciate director Mark Steven Johnson's Daredevil, a lackluster introductory installment that remains faithful to the character's origins but drops the ball whenever the hero dons his fetishistic leather mask.

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American Outlaws Review


Weak

Fictionalizing and romanticizing the exploits of Old West outlaws has been a pastime of the entertainment industry since the day the James Gang robbed its first bank in 1866. From the pulpy serialized dime publications of the Old West itself to the rock'n'roll, brat pack Billy the Kid flick "Young Guns," horseback bandits have made for popular folk heroes.

It's a simple formula: Invent some noble cause that the outlaws are fighting for so they can be passed off as gallant, cast up-and-coming pretty boy actors in the leads, cast surly types as the law (and dress them in black), toss in a few gunfights riddled with hitchin' post clichés and a pretty lass to kiss just before the credits roll -- and voila! Instant Western.

"American Outlaws" is the slick Generation Y model from this blueprint, starring scruffy baby-face Colin Farrell ("Tigerland") as a Jesse James who robs banks to hurt Yankee railroad barons that done killed his maw when she wouldn't sell the family farm so they could lay down tracks.

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The Recruit Review


Weak

Spy movies generally fall into two categories: Intellectual thrillers or gadgets-and-stunts actioners. There's no point in expecting much more than amusement-park entertainment from the latter. But in a picture as ostensibly cunning as "The Recruit" -- about a rookie CIA spook hunting down a mole within the Agency -- the very least the filmmakers could do is not give away their supposed surprises with billboard-sized clues in every other scene.

From almost his first line of dialogue, secret agent headhunter Al Pacino drums home two points -- "nothing is what it seems" and "everything is a test" -- with such deliberateness that long before any real intrigue begins, the film's litany of elementary plot twists is stretched out on the screen like a road map.

Since Pacino's purportedly promising young apprentice, a pretty-boy MIT programming genius played by Colin Farrell ("Minority Report"), can't seem to read these signs, he spends most of the movie three steps behind any astute moviegoer. So it's more than a little hard to believe it when he's plucked from spy school to go undercover at CIA headquarters, working to weed out a double agent while pretending to be a washout trainee who settled for a data-entry job.

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Phone Booth Review


OK

The unnerving concept behind the almost riveting real-time urban thriller "Phone Booth" is chilling and inspired in its simplicity: An unseen sniper calls a pay phone and threatens to kill the man who answers if he dares to hang up.

It's the kind of idea Alfred Hitchcock could have spun into cinematic gold. But in the hands of high-gloss director Joel Schumacher ("Bad Company," "Batman and Robin") the film's intelligence and creativity have to fight for screen time with invasive popcorn-movie superficiality.

Although the story takes place almost entirely within an old glass-box telephone booth at 54th St. and 8th Ave. in Manhattan, "Phone Booth" opens in outer space with a superfluous shot of a communications satellite. A zoom in on the Earth follows, passing down through the clouds until it reaches the pay phone in question while a "Twilight Zone"-like narrator invites us to "meet the man who will be the final occupant of that booth."

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Hart's War Review


Good

One might think that after 60 years of World War II pictures, big budget Hollywood's supply of fresh ideas for such ventures would be fully exhausted. But the court-martial-within-a-POW-escape drama "Hart's War" breathes surprising new life into the familiar by amalgamating genres and adding true human complexity to its not-so-stock characters.

Adapted from a novel by John Katzenbach, the film's recipe combines the prisoners' internal mistrust from "Stalag 17" with the wrongly-accused military trial from "A Few Good Men," leavened with a racial element and accentuated by a tunneling-to-freedom subplot from "The Great Escape" for good measure. Director Gregory Hoblit ("Frequency," "Primal Fear") proves himself a good cook, seamlessly blending these ingredients into a fresh and appetizing dramatic stew.

Talented but over-hyped Colin Farrell ("Tigerland," "American Outlaws") stars as Lt. Thomas Hart, a senator's son with no combat experience and a safe desk job in intelligence near the German lines in 1944. Captured in a roadblock ambush while escorting a commander back to the front, he's interrogated by the SS in a series of scenes that let the our imaginations get the worst of us.

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Alexander Review


Bad

It's anybody's guess what Oliver Stone was thinking by making a film about Alexander the Great that skips over nearly every historical event that earned him that moniker. Whatever his intent, in "Alexander" the director has concocted little more than a surface-skimming soap opera bloated with professorial exposition.

Star Colin Farrell, his hair dyed blonde and given a poufty 1970s "dry look," doesn't have much to work with in terms of character development because every event that shaped Alexander as a man, a leader and a warrior happens off-screen.

The film skips over his first battle commanding at his father's side, and skips over his pivotal creativity in that victory, which established his natural instincts on the battlefield. It skips over his father's murder (although two hours later Stone returns to it in a flashback), skips his ascent to the throne, pays only lip service to his mother's orders to execute his half-brother, and gets the facts wrong about the death of that boy's mother -- his father's more favored wife.

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Minority Report Review


OK

Before I launch into what could read like an unabashedly positive review of the Steven Spielberg-Tom Cruise sci-fi collaboration "Minority Report," let me get off my chest the two things that ultimately torpedo the movie's excitement and stylistic brilliance. Both problems come toward the end of the film, but I'll be vague so as not to spoil anything.

1) The whole plot resolution hinges on that tired and idiotic cliché of an antagonist giving himself/herself away through a verbal slip-up. ("Wait a minute!" replies a protagonist, "I never said...")

There is just no excuse for this kind of screenwriting shortcut in this day and age. It's an insult to intelligent moviegoers, especially in a film that is so enthralling until such bogus Hollywood gimmickry leaves it with a bad aftertaste.

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S.W.A.T. Review


Terrible

When even the dynamic, charismatic, scenery-chomping Samuel L. Jackson seems so bored that he might as well be phoning in his performance, you know your action movie is a lifeless failure.

For the first hour of "S.W.A.T.," an assemble-the-team super-cop movie long on testosterone clichés and short on everything else, there isn't even a plot -- just shopworn stock scenes recycled from 100 other cop movies. Shaky, pseudo-gritty "Cops"-style footage shows fearless tactical teams taking down violent bank robbers in a massive shoot-out! Order-disobeying heroes are chewed out and busted down to menial posts by WASPy, career-minded higher-ups who just don't know what it's like on the streets! Training montages set to grinding, angry-white-boy rap soundtracks that provide zero insight into what S.W.A.T. teams really do! Tons of laughably conspicuous soft-drink and fast-food product placement!

The movie's only capacity for holding one's interest in its first 90 minutes seems to be counting its stupid gaffes in common sense. Why, for example, do police sharpshooters at the robbery fire at a getaway driver through a car's windshield but don't even bother taking aim at a masked gunman standing in the open and firing at bystanders?

Continue reading: S.W.A.T. Review

Colin Farrell

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Colin Farrell

Date of birth

31st May, 1976

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.78


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Colin Farrell Movies

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Newt Scamander is a wizard who's always had an interest in monsters and wild, unworldly...

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Long before Harry Potter - or his parents - took up residence at Hogwarts, there...

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