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Clive Owen - The 66th annual International Berlin Film Festival (Berlinale) - Opening Gala & Hail, Caesar! - Premiere at Berlinale Palace in Potsdamer Platz - Red Carpet Arrivals at Berlinale Palace - Berlin, Germany - Thursday 11th February 2016

Clive Owen
Clive Owen

Lars Eidinger, Meryl Streep , Clive Owen - 66th Annual International Berlin Film Festival (Berlinale) - International Jury - Photocall at Grand Hyatt hotel at Grand Hyatt Hotel - Berlin, Germany - Thursday 11th February 2016

Lars Eidinger, Meryl Streep and Clive Owen
Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep and Dieter Klossek

Clive Owen - 66th Annual International Berlin Film Festival (Berlinale) International Jury - Photocall - Berlin, Germany - Thursday 11th February 2016

Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen

Lars Eidinger, Meryl Streep , Clive Owen - 66th Annual International Berlin Film Festival (Berlinale) - International Jury - Photocall at Grand Hyatt hotel at Grand Hyatt Hotel - Berlin, Germany - Thursday 11th February 2016

Lars Eidinger, Meryl Streep and Clive Owen
Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep and Dieter Klossek

Clive Owen - Opening Night After Party for the play Old Times at the American Airlines Theatre - Arrivals at American Airlines Theatre, - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 6th October 2015

Clive Owen
Eve Best, Clive Owen and Kelly Reilly
Eve Best, Clive Owen and Kelly Reilly
Eve Best, Clive Owen and Kelly Reilly
Eve Best, Clive Owen and Kelly Reilly
Eve Best, Clive Owen and Kelly Reilly

Eve Best, Clive Owen , Kelly Reilly - 'Old Times' opening night curtain call at the American Airlines Theatre at American Airlines Theatre, - New York City, New York, United States - Wednesday 7th October 2015

Eve Best, Clive Owen and Kelly Reilly
Eve Best, Clive Owen and Kelly Reilly
Eve Best, Clive Owen and Kelly Reilly
Eve Best, Clive Owen and Kelly Reilly
Eve Best, Clive Owen and Kelly Reilly
Eve Best, Clive Owen and Kelly Reilly

Clive Owen - Photo Call for the Roundabout Theatre Company production Old Times at the American Airlines Theatre. at American Airlines Theatre, - New York City, New York, United States - Wednesday 26th August 2015

Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Douglas Hodge, Eve Best, Kelly Reilly and Clive Owen
Douglas Hodge, Eve Best, Kelly Reilly and Clive Owen
Clive Owen

Clive Owen - Paris Fashion Week - Emporio Armani - Arrivals - Paris, France - Tuesday 7th July 2015

Clive Owen
Clive Owen

Clive Owen - Celebrities at the Chiltern Firehouse - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 17th June 2015

Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen

Clive Owen - Clive Owen departs from Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 12th January 2015

Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen

Clive Owen - A host of stars were photographed as they took to the red carpet at the 72nd Annual Golden Globe Awards which were held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 12th January 2015

Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen

Clive Owen - A variety of stars were snapped as they attended HBO's Post Golden Globe Party 2015 in Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 12th January 2015

Clive Owen
Clive Owen

Clive Owen - Billboard Women in Music Luncheon 2014 at Cipriani Wall Street - New York, New York, United States - Friday 12th December 2014

Clive Owen

The 9th Rome Film Festival - 'The Knick' - Premiere

Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen

The 9th Rome Film Festival - 'The Knick' - Photocall

Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen
Clive Owen

A Week In Movies: Stiller And Williams Film In Rainy London, While Trailers Debut For Brosnan, Owen, Rio And Maleficent


Ben Stiller Robin Williams Judi Dench Pierce Brosnan Clive Owen Billy Crudup Karen Gillan Lana Del Rey Angelina Jolie

filming scenes for Night at the Museum 3

In the lull between big awards shows, media attention turns to Super Bowl halftime performances and adverts, while award-nominated actors and filmmakers travel around the world to squeeze in their next projects before Bafta and Oscar nights. Judi Dench is in India filming The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel 2 with the reunited cast from the original. Chiewtel Ejiofor is in New Zealand filming something top-secret. Cate Blanchett is taking a well-deserved holiday. Meanwhile, Ben Stiller and Robin Williams have been snapped on the streets of rain-swept London filming scenes for Night at the Museum 3. We braved the British weather to snap the filming in action.

We got our first glimpse of the comedy-drama A Long Way Down this week, with a new trailer that plays up the film's black humour and warm emotion. Pierce Brosnan, Toni Collette, Aaron Paul and Imogen Poots play four people who meet as they're planning to end it all by leaping from a London skyscraper. In the media circus that follows, they make a pact to live for at least one more month. It looks funny and rather sweet, with the terrific cast on great form. It's out in March. Watch 'A Long Way Down' Trailer here.

Continue reading: A Week In Movies: Stiller And Williams Film In Rainy London, While Trailers Debut For Brosnan, Owen, Rio And Maleficent

Shadow Dancer Trailer


Colette McVeigh is a single mother who lives with her mother in Belfast. She is a republican with tyrannical brothers in the IRA. After a terminated plot to bomb London, she is arrested for the part she played in the scheme. MI5 agent Mac offers her a choice: go to prison for 25 years (after all, she is a terrorist), or go home to her mother and son and, in turn, spy on her extremist family and pass on information to Mac. However, no sooner has she become Mac's informant than Colette is in grave danger after suspicions are raised following an ambushed secret operation of her brothers'.

Continue: Shadow Dancer Trailer

Killer Elite Review


OK
Testosterone oozes from every pore of this 1980s-set thriller. It's based on Rannulph Fiennes' book The Feather Men, which claims to recount true events but is frankly very hard to believe. Fortunately, the high-octane cast helps make the false bravado rather entertaining.

Danny (Statham) thinks he's left his black-ops life behind for a quiet farm in the Outback with lusty neighbour Anne (Strahovski), but he's forced back to work when his colleague Hunter (De Niro) is kidnapped. To free him, Danny must kill three ex-SAS agents, which raises the suspicion of a mythical committee of former operatives who protect their own. They send Spike (Owen) to stop Danny and his cohorts (Purcell and Young), but clearly there's an even deeper operation underway, and everyone's heading for trouble.

Continue reading: Killer Elite Review

Intruders Trailer


Juan is an 8 year old boy living in Madrid who loves to tell stories using his vivid imagination. At night, his sleep is disrupted every night by increasingly horrific dreams. His mother is concerned that his storytelling is providing the fuel for these dreams and doesn't believe what Juan tells her; that a faceless demon is appearing to him every night. As his health declines, Juan's mother starts to realise that Juan is not being haunted by an imagined threat brought on by nightmares, as she first thought but an all too real danger that could put an end to Juan's life.

Continue: Intruders Trailer

Killer Elite Trailer


Danny Bryce, an ex special ops agent who was considered one of the best in the world, is a retired member of Britain's Special Air Service (SAS). He is looking forward to spending his days not doing a lot, when he hears that his former mentor, Hunter, has been taken hostage by his arch enemy, Spike. As well as this, Spike has also dispatched three trained assassins - known as 'The Clinic' - to kill Danny, to stop him rescuing Hunter.

Continue: Killer Elite Trailer

Trust Review


Excellent
Even though this film has a deeply disturbing theme, one of the most frightening things about it is the way it continually threatens to turn into a revenge thriller. But the filmmakers have something much more involving - and wrenching - in mind.

Will and Lynn (Owen and Keener) are parents of three lively, independent-minded kids. Peter (Curnutt) is just heading off to university, 14-year-old Annie (Liberato) is starting high school and Katie (DeButch) is still too young to understand much of what happens next. Annie is chatting online with Charlie, a teen in another city who slowly becomes her closest confidant. So she's a bit startled when he confesses that he's 20. Then 25. Then he agrees to meet her and turns out to be closer to 35 (Coffey). But he loves her and makes her feel beautiful.

Continue reading: Trust Review

The Boys Are Back Review


Good
Since it's based on true events (from the life of journalist Simon Carr), this story is rather un-cinematic, lacking a driving narrative. But it's a telling exploration of relationships, relying on a superb cast to keep us engaged.

Sports writer Joe (Owen) is left in a daze when his wife Katy (Fraser) dies suddenly, leaving him to care for 6-year-old Artie (McAnulty). Since he has spent much of Artie's life travelling with his job, they have a lot of bonding to do, so they head out on a road trip. Then Joe's 14-year-old son Harry (MacKay) arrives from England to get to know his dad. With their unconventional family arrangement, these three cause a bit of concern with Joe's in-laws (Blake and Haywood) and a neighbour (Booth).

Continue reading: The Boys Are Back Review

Duplicity Review


Very Good
It doesn't take much to make the life of a spy look great. The travel, expense account, sense of danger, all that role-playing -- it's catnip for most people, whose greatest investment in daily skullduggery tends to be making their boss believe they're actually working. In Duplicity, however, writer/director Tony Gilroy ups the ante by reveling in all of the above while throwing in a keen sense of fun and maybe even a dash of honest-to-god romance. It's a dashing and bright entertainment that aims to please without scraping the floor for your approval. In other words, about as different a world from Gilroy's Michael Clayton as could be imagined.

The film starts with a quick meet-cute at an American consulate 4th of July barbecue in Dubai, where MI-6 agent Ray Koval (Clive Owen) is flirting with Claire Stenwick (Julia Roberts). He doesn't figure out that she's a CIA agent until much later, long after she absconded from his room with a parcel of secret documents and he has woken up from the drugs she knocked him out with. Years later, the two are thrown together again when Koval takes a private security job with Equikrom -- a Unilver-like corporate giant that produces everything from shampoo to diapers -- only to find Stenwick already in place as a deep-undercover operative working for rival firm Burkett & Randle, which is on the brink of a delivering a paradigm-busting new product that Equikrom wants badly.

Continue reading: Duplicity Review

The International Review


Excellent
Tom Tykwer's The International can trace its bloodline back to the paranoia peddlers of the 1970s --- think The Parallax View or Three Days of the Condor -- but benefits tremendously from our current predicaments. After all, can you think of a better time to open a globetrotting thriller that casts a morally bankrupt financial institution in the villainous role?

This isn't just any bank behaving badly, though. The fictitious International Bank of Business and Credit is a global (yet eerily faceless) entity with employees who are experts at covering the shadow organization's tracks. When necessary, the IBBC can make court records, police documents, and even people disappear. The IBBC established its wealth laundering money for terrorist groups and organized criminals. Now it's bidding to broker a major arms deal with China that would supply weapons to Middle Eastern military factions.

Continue reading: The International Review

Shoot 'Em Up Review


Excellent
Presenting the recipe for a Shoot 'Em Up cocktail: Mix together a shot each of John Woo, Chuck Jones, and Run Lola Run, a dash of Sergio Leone and the Coen Brothers, add a twist of John Cassavetes' Gloria, shake vigorously and pour.

Michael Davis' Shoot 'Em Up is a giddy, deranged, pumped-up theme park ride in Bullet Land where the bullets fly like rain, bodies drop like hail, and carrots are used as lethal weapons.

Continue reading: Shoot 'Em Up Review

Children Of Men Review


Excellent
Perhaps because of its bleak outlook, its lushly dark tones, or its often blunt criticism of the current world state, Alfonso Cuaron's fourth major film will have to fight just as hard as his two Spanish films to find an audience. The bearer of one the worst marketing and public relations campaigns in years, Children of Men could have been the wriggling stepson that Universal has made it out to be, but it turns out to be anything but.

It's 2027, and the youngest person in Britain (and the world), Baby Diego, has just been killed by a rabid fan; he was 18. Somewhere between 2006 and 2016, women started becoming infertile, causing mass miscarriages and major panics. Theo (Clive Owen) doesn't seem that concerned when we meet him, narrowly averting an explosion near a local café. He spends his time with his friend Jasper (a wily Michael Caine) who makes cannabis mixed with strawberry and tries to forget the family he once had. Julian (Julianne Moore), his ex-wife, has taken up with a pack of refugees that fight against the military state that has been active since London began understanding its grave future. When Julian stumbles upon a girl who miraculously is with child, she immediately kidnaps Theo and puts him in charge of getting the girl, Kee (Claire-Hope Ashitey), to a specialized group of the world's smartest people known as the Human Project.

Continue reading: Children Of Men Review

Inside Man Review


Extraordinary
Let's just say this now: the heist movie is tired, kaput, over. Maybe it was the endlessly upgraded arms race in cinematic heists trying to outdo each other. One time it's a $50 million job, the next $100 million. Every time the perps are armed with increasingly high-tech gadgetry pitted against One Lone Cop who must say at some point early in the film, "These guys are good." Ocean's 11 and 12 didn't help, playing the whole thing for a lark and tossing around astronomical sums of money like so many imaginary zeros. So with all this to consider, how is it the new heist movie Inside Man - featuring some pretty smart bank robbers facing off against a possibly smarter hostage negotiator - turns out to be such spiffy entertainment?

For one, the film seems located in a neighborhood that's at least adjacent to the real world. For another, it features Clive Owen vs. Denzel Washington; like Batman vs. Superman but with fewer KAPOW!s. Lastly, it's got a sense of humor, remember those? There are those who will say that Spike Lee is the absolute last person you'd call up to direct a heist movie, since he'd never done anything remotely like it before. Ignore them, as he was the perfect director to bring in on this one, Inside Man being almost more a film about New York's gloriously messy welter of ethnicities than it is about a bank robbery. Though the robbery itself is something to behold, too.

Continue reading: Inside Man Review

Derailed Review


Weak
During a recent interview, Derailed star Jennifer Aniston admitted that a close friend figured out the movie's driving twist after watching the trailer. Was the comment high praise for her pal's psychic abilities or a none-too-subtle dig at the obviousness of the linear plot?

Sadly, it's the latter. Derailed opens with a tantalizing scenario that threatens to go down a host of intriguing avenues until novelist James Siegel and screenwriter Stuart Beattie opt for the obvious paths. Note to savvy readers: If you suspect someone is in cahoots with the movie's main killer, you're right. They are. Except for that one guy, who actually does die, though you'd be willing to wager $100 he'll turn up again in the end. He doesn't.

Continue reading: Derailed Review

Croupier Review


Very Good
Mike Hodges, best known for the lean and mean Get Carter (1971), returns to form with Croupier. This polished throwback to the wit and economy of British thrillers from the late '60s and early '70s certainly has style to spare, but like its smooth operator protagonist, it lacks a soul.

Down on his luck novelist Jack Manfred (Clive Owen, handsome and angular as a young Sean Connery) is forced to make ends meet by taking a job at a high stakes casino. He's a croupier, or dealer, operating with cold precision. He sizes up gamblers who line up as the roulette wheel to try their luck.

Continue reading: Croupier Review

Closer Review


Bad
Love and romance are tough stuff. Leave it to Mike Nichols and his adaptation of the callous play Closer to make it even tougher.

The setup holds promise: Four characters in dreary London couple and de-couple, falling in and out of relationships over a four year span. The story is told piecemeal, as it focuses on brief events in the couples' lives, separated by months or years. It begins as American stripper Alice (Natalie Portman) meets British obituary writer Dan (Jude Law) by happenstance. A year later, Dan encounters photographer Anna (Julia Roberts), whom he immediately begins to lust after. Later, Dan plays an internet prank on dermatologist Larry (Clive Owen), which unexpectedly sends him into the arms of Anna. They marry, and Anna promptly starts an affair with Dan. Dan confesses to Alice, she becomes a stripper again. Anna confesses to Larry, and she leaves him, sending Dan to Alice for the first time. And round and round we go until everyone's had a shot at everyone else.

Continue reading: Closer Review

Beyond Borders Review


Terrible
Anyone with a minimum television I.Q, who has seen Sally Struthers' infomercials, knows there are people in the world who are suffering. For most civil wars or cases of starvation, there is an admirable and often thankless effort by those more fortunate to help these people. Beyond Borders glorifies this crusade, yet the movie does nothing to explain the importance of the effort or why so many are willing to risk their lives to help. It seems totally content to use this humanitarian effort as a means to tell a listless and insulting romance.

Angelina Jolie is Sara Jordan, an American in London who is trapped in a meaningless life and a dismal marriage. At a humanitarian aid concert, she meets a crusader named Nick Callahan (Clive Owen) whose passion for helping the less fortunate gives her life a new direction. For the next 11 years, the lovestruck Sarah abandons her son and husband (Linus Roache) to fund and follow doctor Nick's efforts as he travels to some of the world's most desolate places: the Ethiopian desert, the jungles of Cambodia, and the snow-covered slopes of Chechnya.

Continue reading: Beyond Borders Review

Bent Review


Good
Croupier's Clive Owen is fantastic in this otherwise lackluster tale of Jews, gays, and Jewish gays imprisoned during the Nazi Holocaust. Based on Martin Sherman's play, the action is drawn-out with not a small amount of pretension, and the film's conclusion is never short of obvious. Other movies have tread similar ground before, just without the pink triangles. Altogether, it's a lackluster flick.

Gosford Park Review


Good
If Robert Altman had been given The Remains of the Day, the end product might have looked something like this.

Gosford Park is the name of an English country estate, where, in 1932, a gaggle of royals and wannabes -- including a horde of locals plus a popular British actor and a Charlie Chan-obsessed Hollywood movie producer -- gather to attend a weekend hunting party. Upstairs, it's the usual hoity-toity, drawing room chitter-chatter, while downstairs an army of servants does little but gossip about the visitors above.

Continue reading: Gosford Park Review

I'll Sleep When I'm Dead Review


Very Good
To say that the new Mike Hodges film I'll Sleep When I'm Dead confounds expectations doesn't even really begin to describe what this beguiling curiosity does, which shouldn't really be surprise, as Hodges is the director who's given us everything from 1998's Croupier to the Max von Sydow campfest Flash Gordon. Shot mostly in the seedier parts of Brixton (non-swinging London), I'll Sleep is just as ill-concerned with looking like a flash gangster flick - which, in some strange sense, it is - than it is with marrying its two wildly divergent plot strands.

In the first, seemingly primary story, we follow Davey Graham (Jonathan Rhys-Meyers) on his none-too-taxing nightly rounds: a little coke-delivery to a fancy party, then a one-nighter with a blonde model (whom he robs), and then to home. Only he's being followed by some tuxedo-wearing rent-a-thugs and a malevolent Malcolm McDowell, who assault him in a shockingly horrific manner - it's quick and brutal, a Hodges specialty, and completely out of nowhere, like a random visit from the Devil. This leaves Davey emotionally shattered and he commits suicide not longer after.

Continue reading: I'll Sleep When I'm Dead Review

Greenfingers Review


Excellent
My summer was recently saved by two very different movies. On opening night, I saw American Pie 2 and laughed like a moron. Then a few nights later, I watched and thoroughly enjoyed Joel Hershman's Greenfingers even though it didn't feature a trip to band camp, girl-on-girl action, or Seann William Scott.

However, I felt just as good leaving American Pie 2 as I did after leaving Greenfingers, which tells the offbeat tale of British murderer Colin Briggs (Clive Owen of Croupier). After spending roughly half of his life behind bars, he is transferred to a more lenient facility, Edgefield. The picaresque, rustic prison allows its inmates to learn a trade, while enjoying accommodations generally found at most colleges.

Continue reading: Greenfingers Review

King Arthur Review


Good
It seemed doomed to fail. Schlock-master Jerry Bruckheimer had thrown a talented but mildly-experienced director at a costume picture, launching it in the heart of the hyper-competitive summer movie season. Surprise! The super-fun Pirates of Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl grossed $300 million, polished Johnny Depp's star, and introduced the world to barely-legal corset goddess Keira Knightley.

Fast forward 12 months. Bruckheimer brings back the costumes, the swordplay, another talented but mildly-experienced director, and his discovery Knightley, this time in a leather S&M get-up. Add the writer of Gladiator. Can the formula work again?

Continue reading: King Arthur Review

Sin City Review


Good
Innovative and dazzling in its absolute loyalty to thevisual style of its inspiration, "Sin City" brings comic bookpages alive to a degree that is unprecedented in movie history.

A triptych of dark, violent tales set in a fallen cityof corruption and grime, the film is a collaboration between film directorRobert Rodriguez (of "Desperado" and "SpyKids" fame) and graphic novelist FrankMiller (responsible for the gritty reinventions of Batman and Daredevil),whose unique touch in the unusual role of co-director is unmistakable.

Pages from the "Sin City" books were clearlyused as storyboards for the stunning, stark black-and-white cinematography,which features exclamation points of illustrative color: the golden tressesof a beautiful femme fatale, white-on-black silhouettes, red splashes ofblood from brutal murders that occur just out of frame.

His influence can also be felt (along with that of Rodriguezpal Quentin Tarantino, who is curiously credited as a "special guestdirector") in the "Pulp Fiction"-like plot structure thatlends itself well to the interconnected short stories, each of which makeup in atmosphere what they sometimes lack in profundity.

Continue reading: Sin City Review

Gosford Park Review


Very Good

You may need a program to keep track of the two dozen-plus characters in Robert Altman's soap opera, murder mystery, chamber comedy-of-manners "Gosford Park."

Carpeted with dry wit and filled to the rafters with salacious secrets and unspoken animosity, the film takes place at an English country estate in 1932 and unfolds from two points of view -- above stairs, where a multitude of aristocrats size each other up in subtle sociological war games, and below stairs, where their gossipy maids and valets fall into a strict pecking order based upon whom they serve.

The estate is the home of the aloof upper-crusters Sir William and Lady Sylvia McCordle (Michael Gambon and Kristin Scott Thomas) and it's gathering place for their many coattail-riding relatives, including Aunt Constance (the wonderful, quizzically austere Maggie Smith) who habitually puts on airs as if she's not living off an allowance from the McCordles.

Continue reading: Gosford Park Review

The Bourne Identity Review


Good

There's nothing more satisfying during a summer of event movies than to discover a spy thriller like "The Bourne Identity" that's packed with just as much intelligence as action.

Adapted from the slick and savvy novel by the late Robert Ludlum (whose two sequels are waiting in the wings), the picture stars Matt Damon in a sharply focused performance as a mysterious man found floating in the Mediterranean Sea with two bullet holes in his back and a wicked case of amnesia.

He speaks several languages ("Stop messing around and tell me who I am," he admonishes himself in a mirror in German and French). He possessed lethal instincts and martial arts skills, which he discovers much to his own surprise when he takes down two police officers who harass him after he's come ashore in Prague. He knows somebody with a lot of clandestine power is trying to kill him, and his only clue to their identity and his own is a tiny laser pen found embedded under his skin that projects an account number at a Swiss bank -- where he discovers a safe deposit box packed with cash, forged passports and a gun.

Continue reading: The Bourne Identity Review

Closer Review


OK

A sexually charged drama of cross-pollinating infidelity from director Mike Nichols -- whose best work has always tapped into such raw and sensitive areas of the human psyche -- "Closer" derives all its fascination from the nitty-gritty, down-and-dirty character nuances brought to life with discomforting veracity by its foursome of fine actors.

Julia Roberts (as Anna, an aloof but respected photographer), Clive Owen (as Larry, a smarmy doctor), Jude Law (as Dan, an obituary writer and failed novelist) and Natalie Portman (as Alice, a punkette-lite stripper who blows with the wind) are all strangers as the film opens in modern-day London. But as the story leaps forward to pivotal episodes over several years, a series of dates, marriages, illicit liaisons, break-ups and jealous traps shape their boomeranging romantic lives.

The cunning direction of Nichols ("The Graduate," "Carnal Knowledge," "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf") viscerally plugs into the emotional voltage of these edgy, passionate, dishonest, desperate, sometimes sweet but often brutally frank relationships in almost every scene. But the film begins deceptively like a romantic comedy as Dan charms the alluringly unfettered Alice on her first day in London, coming to her aid when she's hit by a taxi. "Please remember our traffic tends to come from the right," he glints with all this English panache after realizing her injuries aren't life-threatening.

Continue reading: Closer Review

Clive Owen

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Clive Owen Movies

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets Movie Review

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets Movie Review

It's been 20 years since French filmmaker Luc Besson shook up the sci-fi genre with...

Valerian And The City Of A Thousand Planets Trailer

Valerian And The City Of A Thousand Planets Trailer

Valerian (Dane DeHaan) and Laureline (Cara Delevingne) are partners. Skilled government agents whose job it...

Valerian And The City Of A Thousand Planets Trailer

Valerian And The City Of A Thousand Planets Trailer

For Luc Besson's latest foray into the sci-fi stratosphere, he has decided to bring the...

Last Knights Trailer

Last Knights Trailer

Commander Raiden (Clive Owen) of the seventh rank is a skilled and gifted soldier, who...

Blood Ties Movie Review

Blood Ties Movie Review

While the story centres on twisted moral dilemmas, this 1970s-set thriller takes such a hesitant,...

Sin City 2: A Dame To Kill For Trailer

Sin City 2: A Dame To Kill For Trailer

It's all about revenge in Sin City now as the wounded (both physically and mentally)...

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Words And Pictures Trailer

Words And Pictures Trailer

Jack Marcus is an eccentric English teacher at a prep school in the country who...

Blood Ties Trailer

Blood Ties Trailer

Frank is a remarkable cop with a lot to look forward to in his life,...

Shadow Dancer Movie Review

Shadow Dancer Movie Review

Like Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, this thriller refuses to burst out into action mode, preferring...

Shadow Dancer Trailer

Shadow Dancer Trailer

Colette McVeigh is a single mother who lives with her mother in Belfast. She is...

Intruders Movie Review

Intruders Movie Review

Fractured into two narratives that take far too long to come together, this stylish boogeyman...

Killer Elite Movie Review

Killer Elite Movie Review

Testosterone oozes from every pore of this 1980s-set thriller. It's based on Rannulph Fiennes' book...

Intruders Trailer

Intruders Trailer

Juan is an 8 year old boy living in Madrid who loves to tell stories...

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