Christopher Plummer Page 3

Christopher Plummer

Christopher Plummer Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Quotes RSS

Christopher Plummer, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards Sunday 26th February 2012 84th Annual Academy Awards (Oscars) held at the Kodak Theatre - Press Room

Christopher Plummer, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards
Christopher Plummer, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards
Christopher Plummer, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards

Christopher Plummer and Independent Spirit Awards Saturday 25th February 2012 27th Annual Independent Spirit Awards at Santa Monica Beach - Press Room

Christopher Plummer and Independent Spirit Awards
Christopher Plummer and Independent Spirit Awards
Christopher Plummer and Independent Spirit Awards
Christopher Plummer and Independent Spirit Awards
Christopher Plummer and Independent Spirit Awards

Christopher Plummer and Independent Spirit Awards Saturday 25th February 2012 27th Annual Independent Spirit Awards - Press Room

Christopher Plummer and Independent Spirit Awards
Christopher Plummer and Independent Spirit Awards

Christopher Plummer and Independent Spirit Awards Saturday 25th February 2012 27th Annual Independent Spirit Awards- Arrivals-

Christopher Plummer and Independent Spirit Awards
Christopher Plummer and Independent Spirit Awards

Christopher Plummer and Academy Awards - Christopher Plummer and Guest Friday 24th February 2012 GREAT British Film Reception to honor the British nominees of The 84th Annual Academy Awards at the British Consul General’s Residence

Christopher Plummer and Academy Awards
Christopher Plummer and Academy Awards

Christopher Plummer and Screen Actors Guild Sunday 29th January 2012 18th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards (SAG Awards) held at The Shrine Auditorium - Press Room

Christopher Plummer and Screen Actors Guild
Christopher Plummer and Screen Actors Guild
Christopher Plummer and Screen Actors Guild

Christopher Plummer, Golden Globe Awards and Beverly Hilton Hotel - Elaine Taylor and Christopher Plummer Sunday 15th January 2012 The 69th Annual Golden Globe Awards (Golden Globes 2012) held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Arrivals

Christopher Plummer, Golden Globe Awards and Beverly Hilton Hotel
Christopher Plummer, Golden Globe Awards and Beverly Hilton Hotel
Christopher Plummer, Golden Globe Awards and Beverly Hilton Hotel

Guest and Christopher Plummer Friday 13th January 2012 37th Annual Los Angeles Film Critics Association Awards held at the InterContinental hotel - Arrivals

Guest and Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer and Jessica Chastain
Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer

Christopher Plummer Thursday 12th January 2012 17th Annual Critic's Choice Movie Awards - Pressroom

Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer

Christopher Plummer - Elaine Taylor and Christopher Plummer New York City, USA - The National Board of Review Awards Gala held at Cipriani 42nd Street hall - Inside Arrivals. Tuesday 10th January 2012

Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer

The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo Review


Excellent
Fincher brings a sleek, achingly cool vibe to this remake of the first novel in Stieg Larsson's Millennium trilogy. Although he doesn't find any more subtext in the intriguing characters and rather straightforward mystery, the film holds us completely in its grip.

Disgraced journalist Mikael (Craig) takes a job on an isolated island looking into the 40-years-earlier disappearance of the teenage niece of millionaire industrialist Vanger (Plummer). But the deeper Mikael digs, the messier things get. He discovers all kinds of nastiness in Henrik's dysfunctional family. Then he teams up with gifted hacker Lisbeth (Mara) to unravel the knots in the story. But as a ward of the state, Lisbeth is also dealing with her own rather intense situation.

Continue reading: The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo Review

Video - Stellan Skarsgard Accompanied On Red Carpet By Wife - The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo New York Premiere Arrivals Part 1


The New York premiere of 'The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo' was held at the Ziegfeld Theater. Stellan Skarsgard, who plays Martin Vanger in the film, was the first to walk the red carpet with his wife, Megan. He was soon followed by his co-star Joely Richardson. But it was Christopher Plummer, who plays Vanger patriarch Henrik, who gained the most respect from the photographers on the red carpet.

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is based on the successful Millennium trilogy by the late Swedish author Stieg Larsson

Christopher Plummer Wednesday 14th December 2011 The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo New York Premiere - Arrivals New York City, USA

Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer

Christopher Plummer - Elaine Taylor-Plummer and Christopher Plummer New York City, USA - The 2011 New York Stage and Film Winter Gala held at The Plaza Hotel - Arrivals. Sunday 4th December 2011

Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer

Christopher Plummer Monday 28th November 2011 IFP's 21st Annual Gotham Independent Film Awards - Inside New York City, USA

Christopher Plummer

Christopher Plummer Monday 28th November 2011 Gotham Awards 2011 - Arrivals New York City, USA

Christopher Plummer, Ewan McGregor and Beverly Hilton Hotel - Christopher Plummer and Ewan McGregor Beverly Hills, California - 15th Annual Hollywood Film Awards Gala at the Beverly Hilton hotel - Arrivals Monday 24th October 2011

Christopher Plummer, Ewan Mcgregor and Beverly Hilton Hotel
Christopher Plummer, Ewan Mcgregor and Beverly Hilton Hotel
Christopher Plummer and Beverly Hilton Hotel
Christopher Plummer, Ewan Mcgregor and Beverly Hilton Hotel
Christopher Plummer and Beverly Hilton Hotel

Beginners Trailer


Oliver remembers the time, in 2003, when his father Hal, came out to him at the age of 75, soon after the death of Oliver's mother Georgia. Hal was wearing a robe and not a purple sweater, as Oliver had previously thought. This came as a shock to him, having thought that his dad was perfectly happy with his mother. But Hal always knew he was gay; though he had thought that by marrying Georgia he would turn straight. Although Oliver maintains that he is fine with his father coming out, Hal's much younger, handsome boyfriend, Andy, doesn't seem so sure.

Continue: Beginners Trailer

Beginners Review


Very Good
With a slow, wistful pace, Thumbsucker writer-director Mills tells a moving story about connections across generations. It's warm and perhaps a little too heartfelt, but it's grounded in the three central performances.

Oliver (McGregor) is struggling to cope with the death of his father Hal (Plummer), only a few years after his mother Georgia (Keller) died. As his memories swirl, he meets the lively Anna (Laurent) at a party, and they embark on a tentative relationship. But he's consumed by thoughts about his father, who came out as gay after his mother's death and then had a complex relationship with Andy (Visnjic). He also remembers time with his mother when he was a boy (Boos), wondering how his personal history is affecting his life now.

Continue reading: Beginners Review

Priest Review


Bad
Bettany reteams with Legion director Stewart for another loud religious-themed action movie. But the po-faced filmmaking and acting only highlights how unoriginal it is, from production design to music to action sequences.

In the distant future, vampires have been vanquished to reservations by fierce warrior priests, whose order was then disbanded. But with rumours of a new attack, one priest (Bettany) returns to action, violating the direct order of his monsignor bosses (Plummer and Dale). Teaming up with a rural sheriff (Gigandet), he heads into the dystopic landscape to rescue his niece (Collins), who was kidnapped by an old colleague (Urban) who's now fanged and evil. As they catch up with him, they're joined by another rogue priestess (Maggie Q).

Continue reading: Priest Review

Priests Trailer


In an alternate world, the earth looks like a very different place, its land ruined from years of battling against an evil vampire race that seeks to take over as the ruling species keeps on growing in power but are defeated by a group of warrior priests who are trained in combat and equipped to kill the mutants.

Continue: Priests Trailer

The Imaginarium Of Doctor Parnassus Review


Very Good
Returning to the florid visual style of Time Bandits and The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, Gilliam takes us on a whimsical flight through his imagination with this scruffy, messy movie. The plot doesn't really hang together, but the cast and imagery are magical.

Travelling showman Parnassus (Plummer) performs on the backstreets of London with his lively troupe: his elfin daughter Valentina (Cole), the eager Anton (Garfield) and the tiny Percy (Troyer). One night they encounter an amnesiac, Tony (Ledger), who joins the gang and suggests modernising the show to attract a better audience. What Tony doesn't know is that Parnassus has made a pact with the devilish Nick (Waits), buying immortality in exchange for Valentina's soul on her 16th birthday, which is coming soon. And Tony has some secrets as well.

Continue reading: The Imaginarium Of Doctor Parnassus Review

Up Review


Excellent
Like Wall-E, this Pixar-produced feature has an unusual structure that continually keeps us off guard. It also tells a story that's refreshingly mature, with moments of heartbreaking sadness and quiet contemplation. Along with the talking dogs and big action scenes.

Since he was a boy, Carl (voiced by Asner) has been obsessed with adventure, following the exploits of the larger-than-life explorer Muntz (Plummer). And Carl shared this yearning with his wife Ellie, although the circumstances of life meant that they never achieved their dream to travel to Muntz' famed Paradise Falls in South America. Now a widower, Carl is finally spurred to action, using helium balloons to fly his house away. But he has company in the form of the eager Russell (Nagai), and they make several strange discoveries in South America.

Continue reading: Up Review

The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus Trailer


Watch the trailer for The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus

Continue: The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus Trailer

Up Trailer


Watch the trailer for Up

Continue: Up Trailer

Up Review


Very Good
Film critics experience varying degrees of disappointment. Terminator Salvation, for example, disappoints because it's terrible and shouldn't have been made, let alone released. The ironically titled Up, on the other hand, disappoints because it doesn't soar quite as high as its acclaimed Pixar predecessors. Holding each new Pixar flick up to such lofty expectations sounds unfair until you realize the animation factory's outstanding features routinely meet the studio's admittedly sky-high quality bar. And some -- like last year's WALL-E, a very tough act to follow -- raise the bar to even dizzier heights.

Up doesn't manage that. It's good, not great, Pixar -- an elegant and somber reflection on life's unfinished business and our tendencies to put even the biggest dreams on the shelf. And as we discovered with Cars, The Incredibles, and Ratatouille, even good Pixar trumps traditional animation from rival studios, and certainly deserves your time.

Continue reading: Up Review

The Lake House Review


OK

Director Alejandro Agresti's The Lake House, based on a South Korean film called Il Mare, takes the premise that launched movies such as Back to the Future and Frequency and asks, "What would a good boyfriend do with these powers?" The powers in this case involve a mystical mailbox that connects two would-be lovers who are living two years apart. Unfortunately, the answer to that question ends up being "Nothing interesting enough to last for almost two hours."

Alex Wyler (Keanu Reeves) is an architect living in Chicago who has recently bought the lake house built by his cold, uncaring father (Christopher Plummer). Kate Forster (Sandra Bullock) is a doctor living in Chicago who has recently moved out of the same house. She leaves a note in the mailbox for the next tenant, which is received by Alex who, puzzled by the note's references to objects that aren't there (yet), writes back. Eventually the two figure out that they are, in fact, living in different years - Alex in 2004, and Kate in 2006. She doesn't bother to tell him how the election turned out.

Being lonely workaholic types and apparently lacking a broadband connection, they decide to continue the correspondence. Rather than ask for stock tips or sports scores, Alex opts instead to do little favors for Kate, planting a tree that will later grow out in front of her apartment complex, or leaving graffiti for her on a wall that no one bothers to clean or write over for two years. As they grow closer, Alex discovers why he can't be with Kate in his present, while Kate struggles with trying to meet him in hers.

The Lake House is the type of film that could make a fantastic half hour episode of The Twilight Zone, but needs to bring a lot more to the table if it wants to stretch to feature length. For starters, the dialogue does not sound like it came from the pen of a Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, but that's David Auburn's name right there in the opening credits. Reeves and Bullock are serviceable in their roles, with Reeves playing 10 percent less wooden than usual and Bullock conveying forlorn with aplomb, but none of this is terribly new or interesting. If anything, Alex's B-plot relationship with his father, which prompts a speech Auburn must have copied and pasted from a better script he had lying around, merits more screen time than the A-plot it barely services.

Agresti's direction at times results in some interesting visuals, including clever attempts to show the pair occupying the same space at different times in one shot. Meanwhile, attempts to have the characters verbalize their written correspondence just make them seem like they're talking to themselves. And while the story has some fun with the notion of a postal bridge across time, the poorly concealed plot points make it seem like there's some mystical mailbox at the end of the film sending us everything that's going to happen before we're halfway into the movie.

In the end, The Lake House is not a particularly bad film, but it's not a particularly good one, either. It smacks mostly of wasted potential, and the sense that the phrase "close enough" informed too many choices. If I were sending letters back in time to someone advising them on which films to skip, I'd probably forget to even mention this.

Pass the salt, Sady.

Inside Man Review


Extraordinary
Let's just say this now: the heist movie is tired, kaput, over. Maybe it was the endlessly upgraded arms race in cinematic heists trying to outdo each other. One time it's a $50 million job, the next $100 million. Every time the perps are armed with increasingly high-tech gadgetry pitted against One Lone Cop who must say at some point early in the film, "These guys are good." Ocean's 11 and 12 didn't help, playing the whole thing for a lark and tossing around astronomical sums of money like so many imaginary zeros. So with all this to consider, how is it the new heist movie Inside Man - featuring some pretty smart bank robbers facing off against a possibly smarter hostage negotiator - turns out to be such spiffy entertainment?

For one, the film seems located in a neighborhood that's at least adjacent to the real world. For another, it features Clive Owen vs. Denzel Washington; like Batman vs. Superman but with fewer KAPOW!s. Lastly, it's got a sense of humor, remember those? There are those who will say that Spike Lee is the absolute last person you'd call up to direct a heist movie, since he'd never done anything remotely like it before. Ignore them, as he was the perfect director to bring in on this one, Inside Man being almost more a film about New York's gloriously messy welter of ethnicities than it is about a bank robbery. Though the robbery itself is something to behold, too.

Continue reading: Inside Man Review

The New World Review


Good
Is there a more frustrating living director than Terrence Malick? It's hard to imagine another filmmaker more fantastically talented or more jaw-dropping awful, capable of conjuring scenes of breathtaking cinematic poetry and cringing adolescent pathos within mere seconds of each other. There is nobody in the modern world of cinema even remotely like the ineffable artist who is Malick - but whether that's a good or bad thing is for wiser heads to puzzle out.

Malick ended the silence which followed his fantastic 1970s one-two punch of Badlands and Days of Heaven - airy, wind-swept paeans to wide-open skies and the loneliness that lies like a bruise on the land beneath them - with 1998's star-stuffed adaptation of James Jones' battle epic The Thin Red Line. It would have been the World War II movie to end the century with, but for a little something called Saving Private Ryan, out that same year. Up against Ryan's self-consciously stomach-churning gore and herky-jerky camerawork, not to mention its resolutely action, action, ACTION! pacing, Malick's moony meditation on the thin line (if any) between civilization and savagery couldn't help but come off as impossibly arch. Never mind that Malick's battle scenes were even more vicious and realistic than Spielberg's, given their eschewing of comforting action film tropes in favor of pure hot chaos. A strike (well, several strikes) against Malick was his habit of telling the story via overlapping voiceovers, as each of the characters thinks Big Important Thoughts about life and war and love. By jettisoning Jones' pungent prose, all the characters ended up sounding exactly the same, like Malick just thinking aloud in the sort of white-noise pseudo-philosophical jumble that Godard litters his films with.

Continue reading: The New World Review

Conduct Unbecoming Review


Good
The movie looks hideous: What, was this made for the BBC? The weird lighting and bad camera work (not to mention the music and even the credits) screams Movie of the Week. Good thing the story is far better than its technical pedigree, a case of military justice about a women, ostensibly raped by a soldier in British colonial India. A number of solid performances can be found in the courtroom (especially Michael York's earnest defense attorney), though the machinations of the case border on the absurd. The ending -- the sole part of the film that is visually moving -- almost makes it all worthwhile.

Syriana Review


Good
Never send a writer to do a director's job. That, more than the addictive evils of easy oil and cozy government/business corruption, is the true lesson of Syriana. When Steven Soderbergh took on Stephen Gaghan's byzantine script for Traffic, he utilized a few simple tricks to keep it all making sense, everything from grouping stories by color scheme to casting vivid character actors for minor roles so that they wouldn't get lost in the shuffle. Gaghan doesn't have these skills to bring to bear and though he beats his sprawling epic somewhat into shape, it leaves one wishing for the film that could have been, given a better director.

Like Traffic, Syriana is a messy Gordian knot of plot, only with no Soderbergh to slice it neatly open. Instead of drug trafficking, the subject this time is the nexus where oil corporations, the U.S. government, Islamic extremism, and Middle East dictatorships come together in an unholy fusion of polity and greed. The characters are introduced at a leisurely pace, Gaghan laying it all out with perhaps a little too much care. Once things start to cohere, the film shunts into a political thriller about an unnamed Gulf State where the ailing king's two sons are jockeying for control; one is a lazy playboy beloved by U.S. interests and the other is an educated reformer who wants to modernize his country and stop kowtowing to the west.

Continue reading: Syriana Review

Ararat Review


Good
Life must be a nonstop party at the old Egoyan homestead. Our pal Atom comes home, tired from a long day's work, sits down for dinner with his wife Arsinée Khanjian, and finally they retire to the living room... where they get to discuss Armenia at length.

Atom Egoyan, the avant-garde Canadian filmmaker born in Egypt to Armenian parents, has a chip on his shoulder the size of the Great White North. And that chip is Armenia. Obviously harboring a deep guilt for his living high on the hog in the West while his ancestors were massacred in the motherland, Egoyan never misses a chance to revisit Armenia as a theme in his films -- even if, say, it's a movie about a strip club and a dead girl (Exotica). And invariably Egoyan casts his wife Khanjian as an Armenian of some sort, always taking the time to let us know she's Armenian with the subtext that she should be pitied.

Continue reading: Ararat Review

Dolores Claiborne Review


Good
Kathy Bates and Jennifer Jason Leigh have returned in a new Steven King film, Dolores Claiborne. Another departure from typical King fare, this is a tense psychological drama and character study, akin to last year's The Shawshank Redemption (also based on his work).

Set on a depressed and perpetually wet island off the coast of Maine, Dolores Claiborne (Bates) is the focus of the film. Looming in her past is a secret: she may or may not have killed her abusive husband (played in flashbacks by David Strathairn). In the present, Dolores has apparently been driven to madness by her husband and her employer Vera, the elderly woman for whom Dolores nursemaids. At the film's opening, we are presented with what appears to be Vera's death by Dolores's weathered hands.

Continue reading: Dolores Claiborne Review

Nicholas Nickleby Review


Good
Poor Charles Dickens. He has the good fortune to be remembered by the entire world. What high school student hasn't been forced to suffer through Great Expectations? Nowadays, one of his books (and he didn't really write that many) is turned into a movie or a mini-series every year. (2001 saw four Dickens recreations on film or TV.)

2002 will earn but a single Dickens adaptation, a motion picture of Nicholas Nickleby, perhaps Dickens' least-read work and one of his most wandering (the novel being more than 800 pages long).

Continue reading: Nicholas Nickleby Review

Cold Creek Manor Review


Terrible
Cold Creek Manor - the heavily marketed new thriller by Touchstone Pictures that stars some of Hollywood's most gifted actors - is without a single creative element. Put simply, it's one of the worst films of the year.

After their son is injured walking on the bustling streets of New York City, Cooper and Leah Tilson (Dennis Quaid and Sharon Stone) inexplicably decide to move their family to the "safer" confines of the countryside (because danger certainly doesn't lurk out there). The house they buy is Cold Creek Manor, a massive property that is in complete disrepair and requires more work to fix than humanly possible. It's not exactly clear why they choose this shabby house; the only clue given is that Cooper, a documentary filmmaker, finds the photos and documents left behind as intriguing subject matter for his next low budget project.

Continue reading: Cold Creek Manor Review

National Treasure Review


Good
If there's one thing every good paranoiac knows, it's that the Freemasons founded America. But what nobody seems to know for sure is the reason they went to all that trouble. At last, director Jon Turteltaub brings to the screen a story bold enough to tell the whole story -- or, at least, one version of it.

You see, the Masons weren't always a massive fraternity of elderly men who carried out ancient rituals behind the closed doors of their lodges. Once upon a time, they were knights. The Knights Templar, to be precise. And the Templar discovered the greatest treasure in human history buried deep beneath the Temple of Solomon in Jerusalem. To keep their treasure safe from the greedy kings of Europe and England, they carried it across the Atlantic to the New World, where they eventually founded a country and built an elaborate system to protect their treasure forever. So begins the story of National Treasure.

Continue reading: National Treasure Review

The Return Of The Pink Panther Review


Very Good
Sellers starred as Clouseau for the third time in this Pink Panther flick, a funny (though somewhat less so than its predecessors) entry into the Blake Edwards empire. The Pink Panther diamond is stolen again, and the bumbling Sellers is thrown back in action to hunt doiwn the thief. Inspired largely by To Catch a Thief, it's all very familiar from the first two films -- right down to the fights with Cato (he springs from a freezer where he's been hiding), but Edwards proves he still has an excellent handle on the genre.

The Insider Review


Excellent
Listen up! A movie adapted from a magazine article about the making of a four-year old segment of a television program: Does this pitch have you hooked yet? No? Well, despite a potentially dry-as-dust premise, The Insider manages to rise above its inherent limitations and provides a compelling look inside the politics of 60 Minutes and the tobacco industry.

They say you should never see two things being made: Sausage and legislation. Add journalism to that list. I've been in this racket long enough to know that objectivity is painfully lacking in the places you expect to find it the most. Backroom deals make strange bedfellows of interest-conflicted parties (e.g. Time-Warner owns Entertainment Weekly magazine, which reviews Warner Bros. films, etc.) So when 60 Minutes producer Lowell Bergman (Pacino) decided to do a story about the hazards of cigarettes in 1996, he found himself embroiled in controversy.

Continue reading: The Insider Review

Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country Review


Very Good
The rule of thumb with Star Trek movies continues to be: even-numbered good, odd-numbered bad. The first Star Trek movie was a sub-Kubrickian snore. The third and fifth were marred by gratuitous action and sentimentality, respectively. On the other hand, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan was an entertaining swashbuckler highlighted by good performances, Kirstie Alley's debut and James Horner's score. Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home was a cute riff on the 20th century environmental crisis.

Paramount eventually noticed the pattern. Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country, the sixth mission of the starship Enterprise, was largely the work of director/screenwriter Nicholas Meyer, who wrote Khan, and executive producer Leonard Nimoy (who played Spock, of course), director of Star Trek IV. The sixth movie generally reflects Meyer's and Nimoy's concern for integrity.

Continue reading: Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country Review

Must Love Dogs Review


Very Good
Hollywood overexposes young starlets, from Lindsay Lohan to Scarlett Johansson, and puts distinguished veterans on pedestals. Yet the industry has no idea how to handle an actress once she reaches her late thirties or forties. Lacking suitable offers for mainstream parts, these talented ladies either pour their fortunes into vanity projects (Salma Hayek in Frida), turn to lower-budget independent fare (Holly Hunter in Thirteen), or dabble in primetime television (The Shield lures Glenn Close, and Teri Hatcher is reborn as a Desperate housewife).

A recent trend finds older but still attractive actresses downheartedly treading water in the dating pool for the benefit of a far-fetched plot. Heather Locklear played a flighty single mom unlucky in love for Hilary Duff's The Perfect Man. Now Oscar-nominee Diane Lane is taking her turn in the barrel with improved results.

Continue reading: Must Love Dogs Review

Lucky Break Review


Good
Prison flick meets musical comedy in this oddball conflagration of genres, a British feel-good flick that just so happens to be the follow-up film director Peter Cattaneo made after The Full Monty. Four years went by, Cattaneo's name became all but forgotten, and films like this became Cattaneo's legacy. (Four years after Lucky Break, Cattaneo is finally shooting his next film.) The lovely Olivia Williams shoulders a lot of love here as the object of one prisoner's sights -- at least when he isn't doing double duty as a showman in the warden's play and planning his big escape. Lively enough to keep you paying attention through to the end, even if the whole affair is a bit absurdly silly.

Dracula 2000 Review


Weak
Well, it's the holiday season and what better way to celebrate than by sucking everyone dry? No... it's not your neighborhood Christmas Key Party, it's Dracula 2000, a gift to all you horror fans for Christmas.

And it's got all of those earmarks of just about every Dracula, a director no one has heard of (Craven just bankrolled it), a series of barely recognizable actors, and a feeling of having been shelved for about four years... oh yeah, and a bunch of religious undertones so the crew can work through their theological schizophrenia a la Anne Rice.

Continue reading: Dracula 2000 Review

Must Love Dogs Review


Weak
While watching "Must Love Dogs," a romanticcomedy about moving on from divorc=E9e depression, I was sure this wouldbe a three-star review. The leads -- Diane Lane and John Cusack -- areirresistibly charismatic but accessible, the writing is wonderfully witty,and the story has a good hook: the travails of internet dating for peoplewho are still young, but too mature and serious about love for delvinginto the meat market of bars and nightclubs.

This was going to be a three-star review because of theway writer-director Gary David Goldberg (adapting Claire Cook's popularnovel) deliberately flirted with and skirted around romantic comedy cliches,making the story familiar yet fresh:

Custom boat builder Cusack and preschool teacher Lane meetearly on (in a park with borrowed dogs they both pretended to own in theirpersonal ads) and have a string of funny -- and perhaps a little too frank-- misfire dates that retain just enough chemistry to keep them both interested.But at the same time Lane, eight months out from being dumped for a youngerwoman and egged on by a family of amusingly well-intentioned busybodies,experiences bad date montages with other men. And Cusack wallows in a littleself-inflicted depression over his own divorce by watching "DoctorZhivago" at least once a day, slumped on his couch like a pile oflaundry.

This was going to be a three-star review right up untilthe movie's final five minutes, which are so much worse than any of thegenre hallmarks "Must Love Dogs" goes out of its way to set upand knock down -- so much more sappy, saccharine, ridiculous and contrived-- that it broke the picture's charming spell.

Continue reading: Must Love Dogs Review

Ararat Review


OK

Writer-director Atom Egoyan's heartfelt passion project "Ararat" is an abstractly structured account of both the 1915-1923 Armenian genocide at the hands of the Ottoman Turks and the massacre's emotional reverberation in the descendants of its survivors.

It's an immense, dark chapter in world history, the gravity of which has never been given its due, especially in the West. As a character in the film points out, even Aldoph Hitler said, "Who remembers the extermination of the Armenians?" when lobbying reluctant underlings to continue with the Holocaust. And Turkey still denies the slaughter took place, despite evidence and eyewitness accounts to the contrary.

Such accounts and denials are an integral part of the truth and shadow at play in this movie, which weaves five stories from three time periods into an intricate elliptical narrative that is sometimes powerfully distressing, sometimes overly contrived and sometimes downright confounding.

Continue reading: Ararat Review

Lucky Break Review


OK

Do you remember that scene at the end of "The Sound of Music" in which the family Von Trapp sneaks out of Austria one at a time during a singing performance? So do screenwriter Ronan Bennett and director Peter Cattaneo ("The Full Monty"), who borrowed the idea for their far-fetched but passably entertaining British prison escape comedy "Lucky Break."

As a matter of fact, in a stroke of intentional irony Cattaneo cast Christopher Plummer -- Capt. Von Trapp himself -- as the prison's warden, whose dream of producing his own musical becomes the catalyst for a group of ambitious jailbirds to make getaway plans.

Lead by charmingly surly, hound dog-featured James Nesbit ("Waking Ned Devine"), the convicts (including comical English actors Timothy Spall, Bill Nighy and Lennie James) rehearse the warden's Gilbert and Sullivan-styled operetta about Admiral Horatio Nelson in the prison's disused old chapel while working out a way to employ stage props to go "over the wall."

Continue reading: Lucky Break Review

Christopher Plummer

Christopher Plummer Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Christopher Plummer

Date of birth

13th December, 1929

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.79


Advertisement
Advertisement

Christopher Plummer Movies

The Man Who Invented Christmas Movie Review

The Man Who Invented Christmas Movie Review

There's a somewhat contrived jauntiness to this blending of fact and fiction that may leave...

The Man Who Invented Christmas Trailer

The Man Who Invented Christmas Trailer

Charles Dickens might be one of the most legendary authors in history, but it wasn't...

Elsa & Fred Movie Review

Elsa & Fred Movie Review

While this geriatric romance is too simplistic and sentimental to be anything remarkable, its lively...

Danny Collins Trailer

Danny Collins Trailer

1970s rocker Danny Collins (Al Pacino) has earned a reputation for himself as a sell-out....

Advertisement
Elsa & Fred Trailer

Elsa & Fred Trailer

Fred Barcroft is an old man struggling to find much good in his life following...

Hector and the Search for Happiness Movie Review

Hector and the Search for Happiness Movie Review

With an approach so saccharine that it makes Eat Pray Love look like an edgy...

Hector And The Search For Happiness Trailer

Hector And The Search For Happiness Trailer

Hector (Simon Pegg) is a top psychiatrist who may appear to have everything one needs...

The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo Movie Review

The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo Movie Review

Fincher brings a sleek, achingly cool vibe to this remake of the first novel in...

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Trailer

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Trailer

Mikael Blomkvist is a journalist for Sweden's 'Millenium' magazine, a monthly publication that has a...

Advertisement
Beginners Trailer

Beginners Trailer

Oliver remembers the time, in 2003, when his father Hal, came out to him at...

Beginners Movie Review

Beginners Movie Review

With a slow, wistful pace, Thumbsucker writer-director Mills tells a moving story about connections across...

Priest Movie Review

Priest Movie Review

Bettany reteams with Legion director Stewart for another loud religious-themed action movie. But the po-faced...

Priests Trailer

Priests Trailer

In an alternate world, the earth looks like a very different place, its land ruined...

The Last Station Movie Review

The Last Station Movie Review

A double love story based on real events from the life of Leo Tolstoy, this...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.