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Christopher McDonald Saturday 22nd September 2012 HISTORY hosts a Pre-Emmy party at Soho House in celebration of sixteen Hatfields & McCoys Emmy nominations

Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald Saturday 22nd September 2012 BAFTA Los Angeles TV Tea 2012 presented by BBC America - Arrivals

Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald and Karen Gillan
Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald Friday 21st September 2012 2012 Entertainment Weekly Pre-Emmy Party at the Fig & Olive

Christopher Mcdonald
Joey Lawrence and Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald Wednesday 1st August 2012 Los Angeles premiere of 'Total Recall' at Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald - Nate Corddry, Christopher McDonald Wednesday 2nd May 2012 The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences presents The 5th Annual Television Honors held at The Beverly Hills Hotel - Arrivals

Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald

Kathy Bates, Christopher McDonald and Screen Actors Guild - Kathy Bates and Christopher McDonald Sunday 29th January 2012 The 18th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards held at the Shrine Auditorium - Arrivals

Kathy Bates, Christopher Mcdonald and Screen Actors Guild
Kathy Bates, Christopher Mcdonald and Screen Actors Guild
Kathy Bates and Screen Actors Guild
Kathy Bates and Screen Actors Guild

Christopher McDonald Friday 6th January 2012 NBC Universal's Winter Tour party at The Athenaeum - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald Thursday 5th January 2012 'Haywire' Los Angeles premiere at the DGA Theater - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald Wednesday 30th November 2011 Chamber Of Commerce 17th Annual Police And Fire BBQ held at the Hollywood LAPD and Fire Division Hollywood, California

Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald Monday 1st August 2011 Arriving at the NBC TCA Summer 2011 All Star Party at SLS Hotel

Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald Tuesday 29th March 2011 Los Angeles Premiere of Cat Run Los Angeles, California

Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald
John Stockwell, Christopher Mcdonald and Paz Vega
John Stockwell, Christopher Mcdonald and Paz Vega
Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald Wednesday 23rd February 2011 Los Angeles Premiere of Warner Bros. Pictures' Hall Pass held at the Cinerama Theatre Los Angeles, California

Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald Monday 7th February 2011 AARP The Magazine's 10th Annual Movies for Grownups Awards held at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald Thursday 6th January 2011 Los Angeles Premiere of Hair held at the Pantages Theatre Los Angeles, California

Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald and West Side Story Wednesday 1st December 2010 West Side Story Play Los Angeles Opening Night held at The Pantages Theatre Hollywood, California

Christopher Mcdonald and West Side Story
Christopher Mcdonald and West Side Story

Thelma & Louise Review


Essential
Thelma & Louise is a landmark film, one that defines the cinematic terrain for female empowerment and one that effortlessly blends powerful ideas about gender with an endlessly engaging story. The film weaves a story about women in distress, who come from depressed backgrounds and seedy locales, which is not entirely different from any prototypical Lifetime Movie of the Week. The genius of Ridley Scott's direction and Callie Khouri's groundbreaking screenplay is that they allow the film to flirt with standard archetypal conventions, all the while upending conventional notions of women -- particularly women in the sort of situation Thelma and Louise find themselves in.

The movie jumps headfirst into the action without any necessary build-up or labored background. We meet Louise, a headstrong waitress, and her younger, flighty friend Thelma (Geena Davis) as they finalize plans for their road trip. Nothing more or less complicated than that. Where they are going is fairly vague; why they are going is more telling: their explicit purpose in taking a trip is to escape from the men in their lives. Jimmy (Michael Madsen), Louise's longtime casual partner, is a gruff mechanic who loves Louise, but doesn't know how to show it. Darryl (Christopher McDonald), Thelma's husband, is a plain loser, a carpet salesman with a cheesy mustache, bouffant-fro, and a lack of respect for his wife.

Continue reading: Thelma & Louise Review

Superhero Movie Review


Weak
Anyone hoping for a ray of sunshine through all the dank, dark clouds that have made up the recent rash of genre spoofs -- Scary Movie, Epic Movie, Meet the Spartans -- should semi-celebrate. Superhero Movie is not the heinous hunk of landfill those other attempts at humor represent. Instead, it's a seldom hit/often miss attempt by some former members of the Airplane! team to recapture a little of that film's old school satire. While much more successful, there's still a dearth of legitimate laughs to be found among the filler and failed lampoons.

High school nerd Rick Riker (Drake Bell) pines for popular gal Jill Johnson (Sara Paxton), and she holds a secret torch for him as well. Still, the couple can't get together, and while on a field trip to a local science lab, Rick is bitten by a radioactive insect. Soon, he has superpowers, like incredible reflexes and the ability to climb walls. He becomes the Dragonfly. Meanwhile, mogul Lou Landers (Christopher McDonald) is dying and looks to an experimental DNA treatment to cure him. The procedure backfires, turning the CEO into a life force draining demon. In order to achieve immortality, thousands must die, and while Landers develops an evil persona known as the Hourglass to achieve his aims, Rick tries to save the city -- and get the girl -- at the same time.

Continue reading: Superhero Movie Review

Kickin' It Old Skool Review


Weak
Haven't I seen this movie before? More to the point: Haven't I seen Jamie Kennedy make this movie before?

Well, not exactly. While Malibu's Most Wanted featured a goofy white guy obsessed with rap culture -- to the extreme annoyance of everyone around him -- Kickin' It Old Skool gives us Kennedy as a goofy white guy obsessed with... breakdancing culture. The key difference? In Old Skool Kennedy is a coma victim who awakens 20 years after a junior-high talent show (after breakdancing his way to a concussion, of course), only to find a world that's unlike the '80s. Wait, haven't I seen this movie before?

Continue reading: Kickin' It Old Skool Review

The Dukes Of Hazzard: The Beginning Review


Bad
It seems that all bad movies deserve a direct-to-DVD sequel, so why not a sloppy prequel to the film version of The Dukes of Hazzard, purporting to tell the "beginning" of the Duke boys story?

Along this 95-minute ride we'll find out where the General Lee came from (dredged from a lake), why everybody hates Boss Hogg (because he's a money-grubbing jerk), and how Daisy got so hot (she just had to take off her glasses and give her wardrobe a trim). If these are burning questions that keep you up at night then, by all means, purchase this DVD immediately.

Continue reading: The Dukes Of Hazzard: The Beginning Review

The Iron Giant Review


Very Good
In the early days of animation, Warner Brothers cartoons spawned out of a desire to displace the overtly conservative and often sappy Disney characters. Bugs, Daffy, and Porky Pig were a little more rambunctious, daring, and raunchy than their Disney counterparts setting a new trend in children's entertainment that was widely accepted. While Disney is still king of the animated feature film (The Lion King, The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast) the Warner Brothers product seems to be a bit less inhibited with it's brand of humor, (Space Jam) appealing to both children and adults. The Iron Giant is just this kind of fun. It's a movie that the kids are going to love, which is complemented with adult humor and themes for the rest of the audience to appreciate.

Set in 1957, young Hogarth Hughes (Eli Marienthal) is fascinated with the lore of an old fisherman who declares that he has seen a UFO crash and a giant creature emerge from the ocean. Against his mother's (Jennifer Aniston) wishes, Hughes searches the forest surrounding his hometown of Rockwell, Maine until he finds and rescues the 50-foot robot-like-creature being shocked to death after an attempt to eat a power plant. The two become friends and with the help of junk-yard owner/artist/beatnik Dean McCoppin (Harry Connick Jr.) they manage to hide the giant from the rest of the town. This becomes increasingly difficult because of the giant's voracious appetite for metal and the presence of Government Agent Chuck Mansley (Christopher McDonald) who keeps snooping around town trying to learn more about this mysterious giant robot that locals keep reporting. The giant can't stay hidden for long and when it is finally discovered a climactic conclusion ensues.

Continue reading: The Iron Giant Review

Quiz Show Review


Very Good
People have tried to peg the "end of American innocence" on all sorts of things -- Vietnam, Watergate, the nuclear arms race -- but Robert Redford is, I believe, the first and only person to blame the decline of western civilization on the 21 game show scandal of the 1950s. But there you have it: A curious incident from the past -- and an inevitability, really -- in which upstanding blueblood Charles Van Doren (Ralph Fiennes in a very memorable role) gets caught up in a fixed game show, bringing the show and its producers (but ultimately, no one else) to its knees. Strangely, for such a buildup -- and Redford manages to build quite a snowball of drama in all of this, full of heroes and antiheroes -- the payoff is a real letdown. America survived the quiz show scandals, and trying to overblow the impact of what amounts to a novelty investigation rings a little bit false.

Rumor Has It... Review


Terrible
Rumor Has It is the only 2005 release that I walked out of. It's really that bad. I am not exaggerating.Just saw it.

Happy Gilmore Review


Good
Adam Sandler is Adam Sandler... er, "Happy Gilmore," as bad boy hockey player cum scratch golfer in yet another turn on the "goofy kid down the block" role he continues to popularize. The biggest surprise is that Happy Gilmore packs some genuine laughs. It's hardly highbrow -- hell, it's barely lowbrow -- but the Bob Barker/Happy Gilmore fistfight and Ben Stiller's uncredited cameo as an evil nursing home manager make this one worth a lazy Sunday rental.

The Skulls Review


Bad
A secret society so powerful it can get away with murder. A secret society so exclusive it firebrands everyone who joins with its mark. A secret society so secret... it has a big logo up on top of the building!?

You know something is rotten with The Skulls right from the get-go. I mean, what self-respecting prep school-Ivy League snob would join an organization with a name as stupid as "The Skulls"? Well, Luke (Joshua Jackson) would be, for one. Only he's no preppie. He's a "townie" with no money, but even though he's of the Lower Classes, since he's such a good rower (yes, "the skulls," I get it), he's a shoo-in for the secret society. A mysterious invitation arrives, and Luke is whisked into a world of power and money, where men in red robes usher in beautiful women for the taking at tuxedoed parties. Before you can utter "Fidelio," Luke has become One of Them.

Continue reading: The Skulls Review

The Iron Giant Review


Very Good
In the early days of animation, Warner Brothers cartoons spawned out of a desire to displace the overtly conservative and often sappy Disney characters. Bugs, Daffy, and Porky Pig were a little more rambunctious, daring, and raunchy than their Disney counterparts setting a new trend in children's entertainment that was widely accepted. While Disney is still king of the animated feature film (The Lion King, The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast) the Warner Brothers product seems to be a bit less inhibited with it's brand of humor, (Space Jam) appealing to both children and adults. The Iron Giant is just this kind of fun. It's a movie that the kids are going to love, which is complemented with adult humor and themes for the rest of the audience to appreciate.

Set in 1957, young Hogarth Hughes (Eli Marienthal) is fascinated with the lore of an old fisherman who declares that he has seen a UFO crash and a giant creature emerge from the ocean. Against his mother's (Jennifer Aniston) wishes, Hughes searches the forest surrounding his hometown of Rockwell, Maine until he finds and rescues the 50-foot robot-like-creature being shocked to death after an attempt to eat a power plant. The two become friends and with the help of junk-yard owner/artist/beatnik Dean McCoppin (Harry Connick Jr.) they manage to hide the giant from the rest of the town. This becomes increasingly difficult because of the giant's voracious appetite for metal and the presence of Government Agent Chuck Mansley (Christopher McDonald) who keeps snooping around town trying to learn more about this mysterious giant robot that locals keep reporting. The giant can't stay hidden for long and when it is finally discovered a climactic conclusion ensues.

Continue reading: The Iron Giant Review

Requiem For A Dream Review


Bad
[As a preface to Jeremiah's review of what will certainly become the most talked-about and overrated film of the year, I'd like to reiterate the extremely graphic and nauseating imagery -- to the point where many audience members find themselves physically sick -- that Requiem for a Dream relies on to tell its story. Jeremiah is absolutely right in his analysis that ultimately, the film has absolutely no message to give. It's all right there in the title: this is simply a 102-minute eulogy, mourning the death of a dream -- or rather four dreams -- of people trying to make something out of themselves and failing miserably at it. Aronofsky has style, but he's left it to the viewer to fill in the substance. That may be the kind of movie you want to see (unlike, say, Trainspotting), but you'll have to figure that out on your own. You'll also need to decide if nausea is an appropriate response to take away from any film. This critic gives Aronofsky points for sheer guts, but there's no excuse for avoiding a story. -Ed.]

Imagine Trainspotting without any trace of humor and you're on the right track. Picture Pasolini's Salo: 120 Days of Sodom shot by some MTV music video kid interested in the novelty of his new camera. Darren Aronofsky (Pi) stacks one degrading sight atop another without implicating the viewer, nor providing any framework or reference for his visual rape of his audience - all smoke and mirrors disguising a great, vapid emptiness.

Continue reading: Requiem For A Dream Review

Leave It To Beaver Review


Terrible
This. Is. Just. Bad.

It's not really appropriate for kids and adults will want to rip their ears off at the lame antics and pathetic excuse for a plot. The only thing worth noting here is the appearance of the original TV show's stars (who all, strangely, appear to have aged little in the intervening years), but that's hardly reason enough to suffer through this dog.

The L.A. Riot Spectacular Review


Weak
A film that works overtime to offend each and every ethnic group and economic class that makes up the smoggy purgatory of Los Angeles while simultaneously patting itself on the back for being so putatively daring, The L.A. Riot Spectacular is a cynical exercise in erstwhile satire that's all the more frustrating for the wasted opportunity it represents.

Like a series of linked MAD TV skits done without regard to network censors - the humor is about that intelligent - the film presents the 1992 Rodney King beating and subsequent riots as a grand comic opera of greed and stupidity, going after everybody involved with equal vigor. One can get a feel for how writer/director Marc Klasfeld intends to approach his subject a few minutes in, when the car chase and police beating of King (T.K. Carter) is done as a jokey game, with a police helicopter pilot serving as the announcer ("and they're off!"), while the cops themselves, having pulled King over, place beats over the ethnicity of the guy inside. Then Snoop Dogg shows up - serving, appropriately enough, as the film's narrator and chorus - to introduce the film proper, while fireworks go off behind him.

Continue reading: The L.A. Riot Spectacular Review

Lawn Dogs Review


Good
File this one under bizarre. Extremely strange film masked behind a setting of recently developed suburbia, where a 10 year old girl befriends the local lawnmower man/country bumpkin. Disturbing look at classist society in America, but a tough, tough nut to crack: Those who want to see Mischa Barton peeing on a car need look no further. And I still don't know what a Lawn Dog is.

Track Down Review


Weak
For this film review, we begin with a history lesson. Kevin Mitnick stands as probably the most famous, the most notorious, and the most successful computer hacker of all time. After nearly 15 years of hacking (alternating with jail and probation time), he was finally apprehended for the last time in 1995, for a collection of tech crimes. and was released from prison in early 2000. (The story of his questionably legal incarceration is itself enough material for a book and a movie.) I interviewed Mitnick shortly after his release; today he's a computer security consultant (though he's not allowed to touch a computer as a term of his release).

Track Downwas produced shortly before Mitnick's release amid much controversy. Mitnick, as you might expect, is a cause celebre among the hacker community, while he's been vilified by the corporate and legal communities. The story of his long career as a hacker was the subject of two major books -- The Fugitive Game, written mainly from Mitnick's point of view, and Takedown, written by the man who captured him. The latter book (widely dismissed by the hacker community as propaganda) got optioned by Miramax, and against all odds, the Kevin Mitnick story became a movie, starring Skeet Ulrich as Mitnick and Russell Wong as Tsutomu Shimomura, the man who "captured" Mitnick and the co-author of Takedown.

Continue reading: Track Down Review

Flubber Review


Bad
See Inspector Gadget. Add anthropomorphic green goo. Same movie. Similarly stupid and vapid.

Unforgettable Review


Weak
Winner of this year's "Most Ironic Title" award, Unforgettable is anything but, taking a subject with some promise--memory transfer--and managing to butcher it into a hackneyed thriller.

Unforgettable reteams star Linda Fiorentino with director John Dahl, who worked so well together in 1994's The Last Seduction. Unfortunately, Fiorentino, who was mentioned more than once as that year's best actress, has been in free-fall ever since, starting with Jade and now turning to this. In Unforgettable, Ray Liotta plays David Krane, a Seattle medical examiner whose wife was murdered years earlier. Krane was the prime suspect, but a technicality got him off, all the while with him protesting his innocence (yes, it's O.J. again).

Continue reading: Unforgettable Review

Celtic Pride Review


Weak
Not really all that funny, Celtic Pride has Daniel Stern, Dan Aykroyd, Damon Wayans, and a kidnapping. If those prospects sound funny, well, it really isn't. The jokes fall flat, and the performers all look bored. Thanks to a remarkably flat script (featuring overzealous Celtics fans who kidnap a rival player), this is one film that won't appeal to either sports or comedy fans.

Dirty Work (1998) Review


Bad
Worthless but awfully earnest slapstick from Macdonald, who ain't finding the Big Screen quite so simple.

The Perfect Storm Review


Weak
I do not like boats. I get seasick. I hate being on the water.

As it turns out, I'm starting to dislike movies about boats, too. They also make me seasick.

Continue reading: The Perfect Storm Review

Broken Flowers Review


Good

After 30 years as a film comedian, Bill Murray has found a brilliant second wind as a character actor, playing deeply soulful middle-aged sad sacks. In "Broken Flowers," he gives an ennui-driven, understated performance every bit as good as his weary movie star from "Lost in Translation" and his weary oceanographer from "The Life Aquatic" -- this time playing Don Johnston, a graying suburban lothario who receives an anonymous letter from a long-ago lover telling him he has a 19-year-old son.

This sets him off on a journey to find the mother and meet his progeny, but the investigation (and resulting self-examination) isn't Don's idea. He would just as soon let this knowledge eat away at him as he rots hopelessly on the leather couch in his living room, which looks like a museum to the moment in the late 1970s when he stopped paying attention to the changing world around him (track suits are his preferred attire). It's his wannabe-gumshoe next-door neighbor (the always sublime Jeffrey Wright) who begins Googling Don's ex-girlfriends, digging up their home addresses, printing out maps from the internet, planning an itinerary and buying his friend plane tickets.

Reluctantly traveling around the country (always ending up with the same nondescript rental car in every city) and dropping in on these exes, non-confrontational Don tries to divine if each woman is the furtive mother, stirring up a whirlpool of uncomfortable old feelings in the process.

Continue reading: Broken Flowers Review

Requiem For A Dream Review


Very Good

Forget every movie you've ever seen about the downward spiral of drug addiction. "Drugstore Cowboy," "Sid and Nancy," "Trainspotting," "Permanent Midnight," and more recently "Jesus' Son" -- these films are almost as innocuous as "Alice in Wonderland" compared to "Requiem for a Dream."

Director Darren Aronofsky's follow-up to the uniquely mind-bending mathematical-theological thriller "Pi," this adaptation of a 1978 novel by Hubert Selby Jr. is a soul-rattling, cerebral and cinematically ingenious runaway train of gruesome overindulgence.

Set against the forlorn backdrop of a deteriorating Coney Island, "Requiem" stars a rail-thin Jared Leto ("Fight Club," "Girl, Interrupted") as Harry, a minor-league heroin dealer who has already copped a bad habit for his own product. As the movie opens he's broken into his mother's apartment to steal her TV -- which is chained to the wall because it's not the first time this has happened -- so he can pawn it to pay for a hit.

Continue reading: Requiem For A Dream Review

The Skulls Review


Terrible

Laced with horribly clichéd secret society mumbo jumbo and unintentionally funny homoerotic undertones, "The Skulls" is a laughable thriller about a pre-law Yale student (Joshua Jackson) so shallow and ambitious that he's willing to throw over his best friend and the girl he loves just to be accepted in an underground campus club of power-hungry blue bloods.

The Skulls, you see, are an indomitable, clandestine handful of the country's social and political elite -- all Yale men -- who the movie tells us founded the CIA among other ominous undertakings. Members are members for life. They get branded and paired up with other members as "soul mates." They live by a musty, leather-bound, 200-year-old book of rules. They cover up each other's scandals.

When this brotherhood accept new members, money is deposited money in their bank accounts, they're given expensive cars, tuxedos (which are worn to frequent Skulls dinner parties), nice wrist-watches, nights with call-girls in a Christian Dior gowns, and -- most importantly as far as young Luke McNamara (Jackson) is concerned -- they pay their conscripts' tuitions and see to it they get into the law school of their choice.

Continue reading: The Skulls Review

Slc Punk! Review


Good

In "SLC Punk!" writer-director James Merendino paints such averitable, aggressively freeform and nihilistic portrait of the tiny SaltLake City punk scene, circa 1985, that you just know he was there.

He gets the rabid social politics and understands the necessarycultural bent toward belligerence. He can write a double-caffeinated voice-overbrimming with drug-induced psychological and sociological observationsfrom a punker point of view, yet make them lucid enough for sober consumption.

Continue reading: Slc Punk! Review

Christopher Mcdonald

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Christopher McDonald Movies

Exposed Trailer

Exposed Trailer

Scotty Galban and his partner Joey are New York City cops, whilst Scotty usually sticks...

The Iron Giant Trailer

The Iron Giant Trailer

Hogarth Hughes is an intelligent young boy with a love of exploring. One day, his...

Zipper Trailer

Zipper Trailer

Sam Ellis is a high-flying United States Attorney looking at a likely rise to the...

Believe Me Movie Review

Believe Me Movie Review

A knowing, very sharp script gives this comedy a very strong kick as it tells...

About Last Night Trailer

About Last Night Trailer

Bernie is your average party guy who enjoys picking up ladies for one-night-stands. After meeting...

The Collection Trailer

The Collection Trailer

The Collector is a brutal masked serial killer who enjoys torturing, mutilating and killing his...

Grassroots Movie Review

Grassroots Movie Review

There's a terrific sense of righteous anger in this scruffy comedy about disenfranchised people shaking...

Not Fade Away - Trailer Trailer

Not Fade Away - Trailer Trailer

A group of three best friends from a New Jersey suburbia set up a rock...

The Brooklyn Brothers Beat the Best Movie Review

The Brooklyn Brothers Beat the Best Movie Review

Fans of whimsical American indie movies will enjoy this ramshackle road comedy about a couple...

The Brooklyn Brothers Beat The Best Trailer

The Brooklyn Brothers Beat The Best Trailer

Ditched by his beloved, budding musician Alex thinks things can't get much worse. But when...

Cat Run Trailer

Cat Run Trailer

Anthony and Julian are childhood best friends who set up a detective agency, Anthony always...

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