Christopher Mcdonald Page 2

Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher Mcdonald Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS

Exposed Trailer


Scotty Galban and his partner Joey are New York City cops, whilst Scotty usually sticks to the rules, his partner has been tempted by dirty money. When Joey is found on an underground rail road track with a knife in his back, Scotty immediately goes to the scene.

Scotty wants justive for his partner but he also knows Joey was taking money from drug dealers and by finding his murderers, he might just bring a lot of dark secrets to light that are best kept unknown. With few leads, Galban begins to piece together his partners last steps and his dodgy dealings - one of his first leads him to a teacher, Isabel, who he feels is connected to the case in more ways than she's letting on.

Exposed is a gritty 'whodunnit' based in a modern day New York City directed by Declan Dale.

Christopher McDonald - The Pan African Film & Arts Festival Premiere Of "About Last Night" - Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 11th February 2014

Christopher McDonald - Los Angeles premiere of 'About Last Night' - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 11th February 2014

Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald - The Cinema Society with FIJI Water & Levi's screening of 'Mud' at The Museum of Modern Art - Outside Arrivals - New York City, NY, United States - Sunday 21st April 2013

Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald - The premiere after party for 'Lucky Guy' held at Gotham Hall - New York City, NY, United States - Monday 1st April 2013

Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald and Eddie Hayes

Christopher McDonald - 'Beautiful Creatures' New York Premiere at Empire State Building NYC - New York City, New York, United States - Monday 11th February 2013

Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald Saturday 22nd September 2012 HISTORY hosts a Pre-Emmy party at Soho House in celebration of sixteen Hatfields & McCoys Emmy nominations

Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald Saturday 22nd September 2012 BAFTA Los Angeles TV Tea 2012 presented by BBC America - Arrivals

Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald and Karen Gillan
Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald Friday 21st September 2012 2012 Entertainment Weekly Pre-Emmy Party at the Fig & Olive

Christopher Mcdonald
Joey Lawrence and Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald Wednesday 1st August 2012 Los Angeles premiere of 'Total Recall' at Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher McDonald - Nate Corddry, Christopher McDonald Wednesday 2nd May 2012 The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences presents The 5th Annual Television Honors held at The Beverly Hills Hotel - Arrivals

Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald
Christopher Mcdonald

Cat Run Trailer


Anthony and Julian are childhood best friends who set up a detective agency, Anthony always wanted to be a chef and Julian's never really had any dreams unless they involve women so logically they thought going into business together would be a good idea.

Continue: Cat Run Trailer

Grumpy Old Men Review


Good
Grumpy Old Men, directed with general disinterest by Donald Petrie, is 100 minutes of Walter Matthau and Jack Lemmon pulling pranks, calling each other names, complaining and falling in love with Ann-Margret. I am suitably entertained by these things. Whether or not you are will be the deciding factor of what you think of what is ostensibly a geriatric Odd Couple.

Milking a 50-odd year rivalry, John Gustafson (Lemmon) and Max Goldman (Matthau), for reasons where logic dare not tread, live right next to each other in suburban Minnesota. Their lives hinge on very few things: Their kids, fishing, grandkids, fishing, evading tax collectors, fishing, and going to the bait shop to talk with Charlie (Ossie Davis) about fishing. That is when they aren't being a royal pain in each other's asses.

Continue reading: Grumpy Old Men Review

Thelma & Louise Review


Essential
Thelma & Louise is a landmark film, one that defines the cinematic terrain for female empowerment and one that effortlessly blends powerful ideas about gender with an endlessly engaging story. The film weaves a story about women in distress, who come from depressed backgrounds and seedy locales, which is not entirely different from any prototypical Lifetime Movie of the Week. The genius of Ridley Scott's direction and Callie Khouri's groundbreaking screenplay is that they allow the film to flirt with standard archetypal conventions, all the while upending conventional notions of women -- particularly women in the sort of situation Thelma and Louise find themselves in.

The movie jumps headfirst into the action without any necessary build-up or labored background. We meet Louise, a headstrong waitress, and her younger, flighty friend Thelma (Geena Davis) as they finalize plans for their road trip. Nothing more or less complicated than that. Where they are going is fairly vague; why they are going is more telling: their explicit purpose in taking a trip is to escape from the men in their lives. Jimmy (Michael Madsen), Louise's longtime casual partner, is a gruff mechanic who loves Louise, but doesn't know how to show it. Darryl (Christopher McDonald), Thelma's husband, is a plain loser, a carpet salesman with a cheesy mustache, bouffant-fro, and a lack of respect for his wife.

Continue reading: Thelma & Louise Review

Superhero Movie Review


Weak
Anyone hoping for a ray of sunshine through all the dank, dark clouds that have made up the recent rash of genre spoofs -- Scary Movie, Epic Movie, Meet the Spartans -- should semi-celebrate. Superhero Movie is not the heinous hunk of landfill those other attempts at humor represent. Instead, it's a seldom hit/often miss attempt by some former members of the Airplane! team to recapture a little of that film's old school satire. While much more successful, there's still a dearth of legitimate laughs to be found among the filler and failed lampoons.

High school nerd Rick Riker (Drake Bell) pines for popular gal Jill Johnson (Sara Paxton), and she holds a secret torch for him as well. Still, the couple can't get together, and while on a field trip to a local science lab, Rick is bitten by a radioactive insect. Soon, he has superpowers, like incredible reflexes and the ability to climb walls. He becomes the Dragonfly. Meanwhile, mogul Lou Landers (Christopher McDonald) is dying and looks to an experimental DNA treatment to cure him. The procedure backfires, turning the CEO into a life force draining demon. In order to achieve immortality, thousands must die, and while Landers develops an evil persona known as the Hourglass to achieve his aims, Rick tries to save the city -- and get the girl -- at the same time.

Continue reading: Superhero Movie Review

Kickin' It Old Skool Review


Weak
Haven't I seen this movie before? More to the point: Haven't I seen Jamie Kennedy make this movie before?

Well, not exactly. While Malibu's Most Wanted featured a goofy white guy obsessed with rap culture -- to the extreme annoyance of everyone around him -- Kickin' It Old Skool gives us Kennedy as a goofy white guy obsessed with... breakdancing culture. The key difference? In Old Skool Kennedy is a coma victim who awakens 20 years after a junior-high talent show (after breakdancing his way to a concussion, of course), only to find a world that's unlike the '80s. Wait, haven't I seen this movie before?

Continue reading: Kickin' It Old Skool Review

The Dukes Of Hazzard: The Beginning Review


Bad
It seems that all bad movies deserve a direct-to-DVD sequel, so why not a sloppy prequel to the film version of The Dukes of Hazzard, purporting to tell the "beginning" of the Duke boys story?

Along this 95-minute ride we'll find out where the General Lee came from (dredged from a lake), why everybody hates Boss Hogg (because he's a money-grubbing jerk), and how Daisy got so hot (she just had to take off her glasses and give her wardrobe a trim). If these are burning questions that keep you up at night then, by all means, purchase this DVD immediately.

Continue reading: The Dukes Of Hazzard: The Beginning Review

The Iron Giant Review


Very Good
In the early days of animation, Warner Brothers cartoons spawned out of a desire to displace the overtly conservative and often sappy Disney characters. Bugs, Daffy, and Porky Pig were a little more rambunctious, daring, and raunchy than their Disney counterparts setting a new trend in children's entertainment that was widely accepted. While Disney is still king of the animated feature film (The Lion King, The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast) the Warner Brothers product seems to be a bit less inhibited with it's brand of humor, (Space Jam) appealing to both children and adults. The Iron Giant is just this kind of fun. It's a movie that the kids are going to love, which is complemented with adult humor and themes for the rest of the audience to appreciate.

Set in 1957, young Hogarth Hughes (Eli Marienthal) is fascinated with the lore of an old fisherman who declares that he has seen a UFO crash and a giant creature emerge from the ocean. Against his mother's (Jennifer Aniston) wishes, Hughes searches the forest surrounding his hometown of Rockwell, Maine until he finds and rescues the 50-foot robot-like-creature being shocked to death after an attempt to eat a power plant. The two become friends and with the help of junk-yard owner/artist/beatnik Dean McCoppin (Harry Connick Jr.) they manage to hide the giant from the rest of the town. This becomes increasingly difficult because of the giant's voracious appetite for metal and the presence of Government Agent Chuck Mansley (Christopher McDonald) who keeps snooping around town trying to learn more about this mysterious giant robot that locals keep reporting. The giant can't stay hidden for long and when it is finally discovered a climactic conclusion ensues.

Continue reading: The Iron Giant Review

The L.A. Riot Spectacular Review


Weak
A film that works overtime to offend each and every ethnic group and economic class that makes up the smoggy purgatory of Los Angeles while simultaneously patting itself on the back for being so putatively daring, The L.A. Riot Spectacular is a cynical exercise in erstwhile satire that's all the more frustrating for the wasted opportunity it represents.

Like a series of linked MAD TV skits done without regard to network censors - the humor is about that intelligent - the film presents the 1992 Rodney King beating and subsequent riots as a grand comic opera of greed and stupidity, going after everybody involved with equal vigor. One can get a feel for how writer/director Marc Klasfeld intends to approach his subject a few minutes in, when the car chase and police beating of King (T.K. Carter) is done as a jokey game, with a police helicopter pilot serving as the announcer ("and they're off!"), while the cops themselves, having pulled King over, place beats over the ethnicity of the guy inside. Then Snoop Dogg shows up - serving, appropriately enough, as the film's narrator and chorus - to introduce the film proper, while fireworks go off behind him.

Continue reading: The L.A. Riot Spectacular Review

Quiz Show Review


Very Good
People have tried to peg the "end of American innocence" on all sorts of things -- Vietnam, Watergate, the nuclear arms race -- but Robert Redford is, I believe, the first and only person to blame the decline of western civilization on the 21 game show scandal of the 1950s. But there you have it: A curious incident from the past -- and an inevitability, really -- in which upstanding blueblood Charles Van Doren (Ralph Fiennes in a very memorable role) gets caught up in a fixed game show, bringing the show and its producers (but ultimately, no one else) to its knees. Strangely, for such a buildup -- and Redford manages to build quite a snowball of drama in all of this, full of heroes and antiheroes -- the payoff is a real letdown. America survived the quiz show scandals, and trying to overblow the impact of what amounts to a novelty investigation rings a little bit false.

Rumor Has It... Review


Terrible
Rumor Has It is the only 2005 release that I walked out of. It's really that bad. I am not exaggerating.Just saw it.

Happy Gilmore Review


Good
Adam Sandler is Adam Sandler... er, "Happy Gilmore," as bad boy hockey player cum scratch golfer in yet another turn on the "goofy kid down the block" role he continues to popularize. The biggest surprise is that Happy Gilmore packs some genuine laughs. It's hardly highbrow -- hell, it's barely lowbrow -- but the Bob Barker/Happy Gilmore fistfight and Ben Stiller's uncredited cameo as an evil nursing home manager make this one worth a lazy Sunday rental.

The Skulls Review


Bad
A secret society so powerful it can get away with murder. A secret society so exclusive it firebrands everyone who joins with its mark. A secret society so secret... it has a big logo up on top of the building!?

You know something is rotten with The Skulls right from the get-go. I mean, what self-respecting prep school-Ivy League snob would join an organization with a name as stupid as "The Skulls"? Well, Luke (Joshua Jackson) would be, for one. Only he's no preppie. He's a "townie" with no money, but even though he's of the Lower Classes, since he's such a good rower (yes, "the skulls," I get it), he's a shoo-in for the secret society. A mysterious invitation arrives, and Luke is whisked into a world of power and money, where men in red robes usher in beautiful women for the taking at tuxedoed parties. Before you can utter "Fidelio," Luke has become One of Them.

Continue reading: The Skulls Review

The Iron Giant Review


Very Good
In the early days of animation, Warner Brothers cartoons spawned out of a desire to displace the overtly conservative and often sappy Disney characters. Bugs, Daffy, and Porky Pig were a little more rambunctious, daring, and raunchy than their Disney counterparts setting a new trend in children's entertainment that was widely accepted. While Disney is still king of the animated feature film (The Lion King, The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast) the Warner Brothers product seems to be a bit less inhibited with it's brand of humor, (Space Jam) appealing to both children and adults. The Iron Giant is just this kind of fun. It's a movie that the kids are going to love, which is complemented with adult humor and themes for the rest of the audience to appreciate.

Set in 1957, young Hogarth Hughes (Eli Marienthal) is fascinated with the lore of an old fisherman who declares that he has seen a UFO crash and a giant creature emerge from the ocean. Against his mother's (Jennifer Aniston) wishes, Hughes searches the forest surrounding his hometown of Rockwell, Maine until he finds and rescues the 50-foot robot-like-creature being shocked to death after an attempt to eat a power plant. The two become friends and with the help of junk-yard owner/artist/beatnik Dean McCoppin (Harry Connick Jr.) they manage to hide the giant from the rest of the town. This becomes increasingly difficult because of the giant's voracious appetite for metal and the presence of Government Agent Chuck Mansley (Christopher McDonald) who keeps snooping around town trying to learn more about this mysterious giant robot that locals keep reporting. The giant can't stay hidden for long and when it is finally discovered a climactic conclusion ensues.

Continue reading: The Iron Giant Review

The Rich Man's Wife Review


Good
There are a couple of rules inherent to the thriller that any filmmaker should be aware of. First, you have to keep the pace moving so fast that the audience doesn't have time to think about whodunit. And second, if you kill off most of the cast, whoever's left alive at the end of the movie is the one who did the killing.

The Rich Man's Wife blindly ignores both of these rules, but still manages to float, thanks to a united effort by an exceptional cast and exquisite production values. Amy Holden Jones directs her own screenplay here, a modern-day reworking of Hitchcock's masterful Strangers on a Train.

Continue reading: The Rich Man's Wife Review

Jaded Review


Bad
One of the most atrocious "thrillers" in recent memory, Jaded stars a buxom Carla Gugino as the victim of a brutal rape -- committed by two women!!! Ill-conceived from the very beginning (from casting Aida Turturro as a "tough" detective and Christopher McDonald as a wacky bar owner), the film actually tries to make its central message the issue that legal "rape" can't occur between two women -- it's "sodomy" instead. A movie about semantics? Never mind the cheesecake, I'm gonna pass on this one. Makes the similar (and bad) Body Shots look like a masterpiece.

61* Review


Excellent
Billy Crystal's 61* explains why baseball is more than a sport -- it's a legacy. I've always seen sports as simple games people play. Sure, those guys out there on the field have talent, but why do athletes get paid more than doctors, teachers, and scientists? Do teachers spend a large portion of their lives hundreds of miles apart from their loving family? Other professions are indeed more important, but seldom do they get this stressful or demanding. Now I have a new appreciation for baseball and sports alike.

Good movies about baseball make the game look like a lot of fun, sharing the enthusiasm and energy of the players. 61* doesn't do that. It does contain intense sequences of ball playing, but the main goal here is examining the overworked life a ballplayer must live in order to receive his short 15 minutes of fame. This movie allows us to take part in that experience, both positive and negative.

Continue reading: 61* Review

S.L.C. Punk! Review


Excellent
Ah, to be a young anarchist in 1985... in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Using the most conservative city in America as a backdrop for the American punk movement proves to be nothing short of brilliance in S.L.C. Punk! This little gem features the always-engaging Matthew Lilliard as "Stevo," a blue-haired college grad in the Reagan years who rages against the machine, his parents, his enemies, and -- of course -- Utah.

Continue reading: S.L.C. Punk! Review

Speakeasy Review


OK
Here's something I didn't know: Those Project Greenlight people not only made the awful Stolen Summer during that first season. They also made the runner up, a movie called Speakeasy. This one Miramax couldn't be coaxed into releasing in theaters: It arrives on DVD three years later.

Now that the Greenlight formula is well established, it comes as no surprise to find Speakeasy falling right in line with the films we've seen before. It's basically a family drama, it has elements of a period piece scattered throughout, it's got a disabled person or two, and its screenplay eventually wraps around to where things began. Simple, small, and manipulative, this is what Project Greenlight has become all about: It's the Lifetime Network of the indie cinema movement.

Continue reading: Speakeasy Review

The Perfect Storm Review


Weak

Somewhere inside "The Perfect Storm" there's a near-perfect movie drowning under gale-force swells of romanticized sea-faring melodrama.

Here's a stomach-in-knots true story about the rugged crew a swordfishing boat caught in the biggest sea storm in modern history -- a terrifying human saga with unsurpassed, seat-gripping special effects, strong performances from a stellar cast and level of realism so potent you can almost smell the 200-lb. fish and the sweat of the men who scrape together a living endangering their lives to net them at sea.

Yet the movie's potential got gutted in post-production, where director Wolfgang Petersen ("Outbreak," "Air Force One") slathered it in sentimentality weepy voice-overs, choppy editing and an incessant, intrusive score (by "Titanic's" James Horner) that saturates every single frame of the film with pounding tympani and crashing cymbals.

Continue reading: The Perfect Storm Review

Christopher Mcdonald

Christopher Mcdonald Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Christopher McDonald Movies

Exposed Trailer

Exposed Trailer

Scotty Galban and his partner Joey are New York City cops, whilst Scotty usually sticks...

The Iron Giant Trailer

The Iron Giant Trailer

Hogarth Hughes is an intelligent young boy with a love of exploring. One day, his...

Zipper Trailer

Zipper Trailer

Sam Ellis is a high-flying United States Attorney looking at a likely rise to the...

Believe Me Movie Review

Believe Me Movie Review

A knowing, very sharp script gives this comedy a very strong kick as it tells...

About Last Night Trailer

About Last Night Trailer

Bernie is your average party guy who enjoys picking up ladies for one-night-stands. After meeting...

The Collection Trailer

The Collection Trailer

The Collector is a brutal masked serial killer who enjoys torturing, mutilating and killing his...

Grassroots Movie Review

Grassroots Movie Review

There's a terrific sense of righteous anger in this scruffy comedy about disenfranchised people shaking...

Not Fade Away - Trailer Trailer

Not Fade Away - Trailer Trailer

A group of three best friends from a New Jersey suburbia set up a rock...

The Brooklyn Brothers Beat the Best Movie Review

The Brooklyn Brothers Beat the Best Movie Review

Fans of whimsical American indie movies will enjoy this ramshackle road comedy about a couple...

The Brooklyn Brothers Beat The Best Trailer

The Brooklyn Brothers Beat The Best Trailer

Ditched by his beloved, budding musician Alex thinks things can't get much worse. But when...

Cat Run Trailer

Cat Run Trailer

Anthony and Julian are childhood best friends who set up a detective agency, Anthony always...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.