Chris O'donnell

Chris O'donnell

Chris O'donnell Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Quotes RSS

CBS Summer Soiree

Chris O'Donnell - CBS Summer Soiree at London Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 18th May 2015

Miguel Ferrer, LL Cool J, Chris O'Donnell, Eric Christian Olsen, Barrett Foa, Renee Felice Smith and Daniela Ruah
Miguel Ferrer, LL Cool J, Chris O'Donnell, Eric Christian Olsen, Barrett Foa, Renee Felice Smith and Daniela Ruah
Miguel Ferrer, LL Cool J, Chris O'Donnell, Eric Christian Olsen, Barrett Foa, Renee Felice Smith and Daniela Ruah
Miguel Ferrer, LL Cool J, Chris O'Donnell, Eric Christian Olsen, Barrett Foa, Renee Felice Smith and Daniela Ruah
Chris O'Donnell and LL Cool J

3rd ANNUAL CBS TELEVISION STUDIOS ROOFTOP SUMMER SOIREE

Chris O'Donnell - Celebrities attend the 3rd Annual CBS Television Studios Rooftop Summer Soiree at The London Hotel. at The London Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 19th May 2015

Chris O'Donnell and Miguel Ferrer
Chris O'Donnell, Miguel Ferrer and LL Cool J
Chris O'Donnell, Miguel Ferrer and LL Cool J
Chris O'Donnell, Miguel Ferrer and LL Cool J
Chris O'Donnell, Miguel Ferrer and LL Cool J

Chris O'Donnell is honored on Hollywood Walk of Fame

Chris O'Donnell - Chris O'Donnell is honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at Hollywood Blvd - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 5th March 2015

Chris O'Donnell, LL Cool J and James Todd Smith
Chris O'Donnell, LL Cool J and James Todd Smith
Caroline Fentress O'Donnell, Chris O'Donnell, Lily Anne O'Donnell, Charles McHugh O'Donnell, Finley O'Donnell, Maeve Frances O'Donnell and Christopher O'Donnell Jr
Chris O'Donnell, Siblings and Mother Julie Ann Rohs von Brecht O'Donnell
Chris O'Donnell, Miguel Ferrer, Eric Christian Olsen, Renee Felice Smith, Daniela Ruah, LL Cool J and Barrett Foa

Chris O'Donnell Honored with a Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame

LL Cool J and Chris O'Donnell - Shots of American actor Chris O'Donnell as he was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk Of Fame in Hollywood, California, United States - Thursday 5th March 2015

Chris O'Donnell and LL Cool J
Chris O'Donnell and LL Cool J
Chris O'Donnell and LL Cool J
Chris O'Donnell and LL Cool J
Chris O'Donnell and LL Cool J

Chris O'Donnell sitting on a park bench in Los Angeles

Chris O'Donnell - ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ and ‘Batman and Robin’ star, Chris O’Donnell, was photographed on a Los Angeles park bench with what looks like a script - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 26th August 2014

Chris O'Donnell
Chris O'Donnell
Chris O'Donnell
Chris O'Donnell
Chris O'Donnell

'NCIS' Spawns New Orleans Spin-Off


Mark Harmon LL Cool J Chris O'Donnell

Spin-offs seem to be all the rage this month, with NCIS becoming the latest show to be expanding its franchise. CBS announced they would be expanding their popular NCIS franchise, a show centred on the fictional police branch, the Naval Criminal Investigation Service. The fictional police organisation already has branches in Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but a third New Orleans base will feature in a spin-off series slated to air next spring. 

Mark Harmon
Mark Harmon will be producing the NCIS spin-off.

The original part of the franchise stars Mark Harmon and Michael Weatherley as the two agents; whilst Chris O'Donnell and LL Cool J aka Sam Hanna stars in NCIS: Los Angeles. Harmon will act as the executive producer of the series; and the showrunner Gary Glasberg will also have a producer's credit.

Continue reading: 'NCIS' Spawns New Orleans Spin-Off

Video - CBS CEO Les Moonves Joined By Wife Julie Chen, Will Arnett and LL Cool J At CBS Upfront 2013 - Part 3


CBS CEO Les Moonves and his wife 'The Talk' host Julie Chen were among red carpet arrivals at the 2012 CBS Upfront Presentation along with Will Arnett, who will appear in the new CBS sitcom 'The Millers', and 'NCIS: Los Angeles' star LL Cool J.

Continue: Video - CBS CEO Les Moonves Joined By Wife Julie Chen, Will Arnett and LL Cool J At CBS Upfront 2013 - Part 3

Cats & Dogs: The Revenge Of Kitty Galore Review


Grim
Things have been ramped up considerably in the nine years since Cats & Dogs, and it's not good news. This film is more of a full-on spy spoof, but unlike the original it's too talky and chaotic to engage with either kids or adults.

Diggs (voiced by Marsden) is a brave but impulsive K-9 cop sacked from the San Francisco police force but recruited by the top-secret dog intelligence agency to work with veteran Butch (Nolte) to stop the menacing Kitty Galore (Midler) from taking over the world. But the cats aren't happy with Kitty's evil plan either, so feline spy Catherine (Applegate) teams up with the dogs. Yes, dogs and cats working together! Of course, Diggs' human partner (O'Donnell) and Kitty's magician owner (McBrayer) are oblivious.

Continue reading: Cats & Dogs: The Revenge Of Kitty Galore Review

Max Payne Review


Weak
To paraphrase comedian/pundit Bill Maher, "New rule! Motion picture adaptations of successful video games must at least be as exciting and inventive as the product they are based on." Of course, Hollywood violates this mandate almost every time they take a game title and turn it into a film. With very few exceptions, the translation doesn't work. The latest victim of this mindless media reimaging is Max Payne. While avoiding much of what made the bullet-time-dependent third person shooter a hit, it tries to turn its tale of a haunted policeman desperate for vengeance into something otherworldly and epic. Until the oddball finish, it's just a lot of slo-mo stiffness.

Three years ago, Max Payne (Mark Wahlberg) was a cop. But after a trio of junkies killed his wife and child, he went a little nuts. Now, he spends his days digging through cold case files, and his nights tracking down unsuccessful leads. When a young woman named Natasha (Olga Kurylenko) is found murdered, his wallet in her hand, Payne is instantly a suspect. When his ex-partner (Donal Logue) also turns up butchered, they put Officer Jim Bravura (Chris "Ludacris" Bridges) on our hero's tail. Looking for answers, Max turns to his father's friend BB (Beau Bridges), now the head of security for the pharmaceutical company where his late wife worked, for some answers. It forces a confrontation with guilt ridden corporate toadie Jason Colvin (Chris O'Donnell), a link to insane ex-soldier Jack Lupino (Amaury Nolasco), the discovery of a highly addictive (and dangerous) drug named Valkyr, and a standoff with no-nonsense assassin Mona Sax (Mila Kunis). Whew!

Continue reading: Max Payne Review

Kit Kittredge: An American Girl Review


Grim
Quick -- name three subjects you think would result in a surefire family film hit. If you said The Great Depression, hobo culture, and the social pariah realities of both, you are clearly one of the suits that saw fit to greenlight Kit Kittredge: An American Girl. Granted, this starring vehicle for Little Miss Sunshine's Abigail Breslin, does fit her perky Oscar-nominated spunk to a T. But the dour backdrop of America in the throes of a bleak fiscal future, along with the resulting rampant homelessness, is enough to give modern audiences some substantial mortgage crisis déjà-vu.

When her dad (Chris O'Donnell) loses his car dealership and heads off to Chicago to look for work, Cincinnati's own Kit Kittredge (Breslin) helps her mother (Julia Ormond) turn the family home into a boarding house. There, they take in several guests, including the snooty Mrs. Howard (Glenne Hedley) and her son Sterling (Zach Mills), wacky mobile librarian Miss Bonds (Joan Cusack), doe-eyed dance instructor Miss Dooley (Jane Krakowski), and struggling magician Mr. Berk (Stanley Tucci). When a string of crimes is linked to a rise in the transient population, Kit puts on her wannabe-reporter's hat and investigates. Her goal: to become the youngest journalist on the city paper and discover the truth of what's going on.

Continue reading: Kit Kittredge: An American Girl Review

The Sisters Review


Terrible
Films have certain advantages over stage plays - locations can shift, laws of physics need not apply, and characters can do more than stand around and talk ad nauseam. Unfortunately, no one shared this world of possibilities with the makers of The Sisters, an aggressively frustrating and ultimately nonsensical waste of time and talent.The titular Prior sisters, hyper-literate and unlikable to a one, are conveniently categorized archetypes capable of little beyond petty bickering. There's the oldest, Olga (Mary Stuart Masterson), cold, repressed, and overly rational; the middle, Marcia (Maria Bello), whose vicious unhappiness has turned her into predatory shrew; and baby Irene (Erika Christensen), the idealistic peacemaker. The family, along with brother Andrew (Nivola), a spineless placeholder, and various relatives and hangers-on, assembles regularly for festive occasions as heartwarming as a pack of coyotes fighting over a kill.The melodrama is intimate but overly full of histrionics: Marcia is trapped in an awful marriage to an equally bilious psychologist and tempted into an affair - after approximately an hour of acquaintance - with a former student of her father's (Tony Goldwyn); two different professors (one acerbic, the other puppyish) are in love with the oblivious Irene; the entire family hates Andrew's trashy fiancée, Nancy. Each conflict plays out in vicious familial attacks and endless, self-congratulatory, falsely profound dialogue.The Sisters is based on the Chekov play Three Sisters, and I will title that Problem #1: It sticks too closely to the devices of the original. In Chekov's time, an unhappy marriage was permanent, love could be so socially unacceptable it was rendered unmentionable, and repression was a legitimate way of life. In a modern setting, the confines are simply not as limiting as the characters would like to believe. Marcia makes no secret of being violently miserable in her marriage and communicates with her husband solely in hurled vitriol, and yet she stays! For no good reason! This isn't a tragic character; she's a woe-is-me-martyr, and impossible to like for it.Problem #2 is in the adaptation of the piece from a stage play to the screen. I'd guess that, in the process, Richard Alfeiri was reluctant to make any significant alterations to his original or offer many concessions to the medium, because this reads exactly like a play. That isn't a complement; these characters do nothing but talk. In a stage setting, audiences are willing to put up with florid language, but for film, the dialogue is ridiculous. Characters pack every sentence with as many 50-cent-words possible - why say "live" when "inhabit" has so many more syllables? During one (of many) heated arguments, one sister actually says to another, "You do not understand my complexities enough to analyze and categorize me!" I wish I were making that up, or that it were an anomaly. But no, they are all so pleased with themselves, with their endless babble about the "nature of their truth" that every sentence furthers the desire to slap each and every character. Hard.Probably the biggest problem with The Sisters, however, is how great a waste it is. Despite the irritating script and visuals that are so sporadically fanciful that it looks as though Arthur Allan Seidelman is discovering the effects features on Final Cut Pro and wants to show them off, the cast is uniformly stellar. Bello's Marcia is deplorable, but she acts the hell out of her; same goes for Masterson and Elizabeth Banks as the uniformly reviled Nancy. All, really, are much better than the material given, so it is unclear what possessed such a rock-sold cast to sign on to such a screenplay, but at least their presence makes the film occasionally bearable.

Batman & Robin Review


Unbearable
This fourth episode in the Batman series isn't a movie so much as a theme park. It wasn't scripted so much as run through the Hollywood script mill, where every line of dialogue is reduced to a catchphrase. "Allow me to break the ice," says Mr. Freeze (Arnold Schwarzenegger), "My name is Freeze. Learn it well. For it's the chilling sound of your doom." That groaner is representative of pretty much every line of Batman's arch-nemesis. He later posits such zingers as, "Tonight, hell freezes over!" and "You're not sending me to the cooler!" This is not character development so much as paint-by-numbers screenwriting, where you can imagine the gang sitting around wondering what incorrigible pun they'll come up with next.

Tim Burton's first two Batman films were all about this nerd auteur playing with a gigantic train set, so even though the stories were threadbare and superficial, at least Burton brought a highly stylized pop Gothic look. Jack Nicholson hammed it up nicely as the Joker and Michelle Pfeiffer's Catwoman was an unforgettably sexy femme fatale who was able to hold her own in a power struggle with the caped crusader. Say what you will, the films had their moments, and even miscast Michael Keaton was an enjoyable wild card.

Continue reading: Batman & Robin Review

In Love and War Review


Grim
This period epic went virtually unseen and for good reason: It doesn't tell you much about love or war... or Ernest Hemingway, its ostensible subject. Chris O'Donnell playing rough-and-tumble Hemingway during his spell in World War I (which he spent in a hospital, falling for one of the nurses) is the bulk of the problem, but Richard Attenborough has never been one to tell a story succinctly, and In Love and War rambles interminably forever, going absolutely nowhere. The script, adapted from the nurse's diaries, actually feels like it was adapted from some nurse's diaries. I'll just read my wife's diary if I want that kind of a thrill.

Cookie's Fortune Review


Good
Quick: Name Robert Altman's last movie.

Nope, it's not Short Cuts. It's not The Player. It was The Gingerbread Man. Before that it was Kansas City. And before that, Ready to Wear. It's been six years since Altman's last decent picture. And he's got a lot to redeem himself for.

Continue reading: Cookie's Fortune Review

The Chamber Review


Terrible
Goody goody Chris O'Donnell heads down to Mississippi to defend his long lost grandpa, who's about to be executed for a racist hate crime decades earlier. Is it possible to care about this story? Faye Dunaway's puppy dog performance sure doesn't help matters.
Chris O'donnell

Chris O'donnell Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Chris O'Donnell

Date of birth

26th June, 1970

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.78