Chris Eigeman

Chris Eigeman

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Chris Eigeman , Alan Hruska - 'Laugh It Up, Stare It Down' photocall held at the Theater Center - Arrivals at Theater Center, - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 18th August 2015

Chris Eigeman and Alan Hruska
Chris Eigeman

Arbitrage Review


Very Good

Richard Gere delivers such a charming, layered performance that he overcomes a contrived plot that piles too many financial and personal crises on the central character. But Gere is magnetic, and the film's themes resonate at a time of economic difficulty, most notably in the idea that all major world events revolve around money.

Gere plays 60-year-old financial mogul Robert, who lives the high life with a private jet, glamorous philanthropist wife Ellen (Sarandon) and sexy French art-dealer mistress Julie (Casta). He seduces the press with his intelligent wit, and has managed to conceal the fact that he's in severe money trouble. Everything hinges on selling his company, but the buyers are dragging their feet. Then he is involved in a fatal car crash that could undo everything. He turns to an estranged friend (Parker) for help, but a tenacious police detective (Roth) is beginning to piece it all together.

Having Gere in the central role makes all the difference here, because he is able to add the subtext and moral ambiguity that's lacking in the script and direction. Otherwise, it's shot like a too-obvious TV movie with close-up camerawork, a bland Cliff Martinez score and constant moralising about family values. By contrast, Gere is a shady character who is up to all kinds of unethical things and yet holds our sympathies because we can see that he's not all bad. Even so, the script puts him through the wringer, with a never-ending stream of personal and professional problems.

Continue reading: Arbitrage Review

Arbitrage Trailer


Robert Miller is billionaire hedge fund businessman who at first glance seems to have the perfect life; successful, plenty of money, a supportive wife and a daughter/ business partner willing to take on the company when he retires. However, something much darker is going on underneath as he is struggling to cover up many years of fraudulent activities while trying to sell away his business to a bank. Not only this, but he has also embarked on an illicit affair with the young and beautiful Julie Cote who he attempts to whisk away with him for a while. As fate would have it, Robert finds himself drifting off to sleep in the car as they drive out of town and subsequently fails to prevent a crash that instantly kills Julie. As he attempts to cover his tracks by setting fire to the vehicle, his whole life is on the line with suspicious police officers, a mistrustful wife and a daughter with an unfortunate eye for detail threatening to collapse the empire he has worked so hard for.

This gripping thriller drama premiered in the US in September 2012 and serves as the full-length feature directorial debut of Nicholas Jarecki ('The Informers' screenwriter) who was also responsible for writing the fantastic screenplay.

Starring: Richard Gere, Susan Sarandon, Tim Roth, Brit Marling, Laetitia Casta, Nate Parker, Stuart Margolin, Chris Eigeman, Graydon Carter, Bruce Altman, Larry Pine, Curtiss Cook, Reg E. Cathey, Felix Solis, Monica Raymund, Gabrielle Lazure, Shawn Elliott, Maria Bartiromo, David Faber, Josh Pais, Alyssa Sutherland, Paula Devicq, Zack Robidas & Betsy Aidem.

Continue: Arbitrage Trailer

Turn The River Review


Excellent
A jumpy forger asks an attractive pool hustler acquaintance, "What are you doing in town?" Without missing a beat, she replies, "Trying to get out." It's an apt summary of the entire plot of Turn the River, a stark, barebones genre piece redolent of rosin, racks, and eight balls, where the winning of a hustle bet of $50,000 doesn't signify triumph but escape.

Chris Eigeman makes an impressive debut as writer/director of Turn the River, ably abetted by an intense, edgy star turn from Famke Janssen as a pool hustler who wants to grab her abused son away from his weak, alcoholic father and get the hell out of town fast.

Continue reading: Turn The River Review

The Treatment Review


Good
Co-writer, co-producer, and director Oren Rudavsky must have really loved the novel The Treatment. I'd wager anything he has his own issues with psychotherapy going on. Alas, good intentions and a fondness for source material do not a great movie make. And while The Treatment has its moments, it's on the whole a little flat.

The film revolves around a highschool teacher (a rather haggard-looking Chris Eigeman) who's so deep into therapy that Dr. Ernesto Morales (Ian Holm) basically runs his life. A chance encounter with one of the school's bankrollers (Famke Janssen) turns his thoughts to love. When she is revealed to be a widow and single mother, though, things get a little tricky.

Continue reading: The Treatment Review

Metropolitan Review


Extraordinary
The strange obsessions and nuances of the rich, especially New York rich, have been hit on more times than that cute brunette at the end of the bar with a tattoo on her tailbone and freshly pierced tongue. Of course, Jean Renoir (Rules of the Game) and George Cukor (The Philadelphia Story) have rendered it with complete command, but those are the old rich. There is a strict difference between the bizarre, scary privileges of the older rich and the snotty, surreal privileges of the young rich. It's this world that Whit Stillman (Barcelona), a phantom of a director, explores in Metropolitan, and no, there are no robots to be seen.

On a cold, beautiful, New York winter night, Tom Townsend (Edward Clements) walks down a Manhattan street in a raincoat. By accident, he bumps into a pack of NY upper-crust college student by trying to get the same cab they were going for (where would film be without this coincidental bump-in?). The group seems to be led by the charming and overly cynical Nick Smith (Christopher Eigeman), but in fact the group is an entity, in and of itself. By assuming he's for another Manhattan socialite, the group accepts Tom as one of their own, connected only by a girl he dated through letters, Serena Slocum (Elizabeth Thomas). Nick pontificates on their privileged lives and the evil Rick Von Sloneker (Will Kempe) while Tom ignores the obvious crush of Audrey (Carolyn Farina), who seems to be the group's only level-headed girl. Adding to this, Audrey is coyly pursued by Charlie (Taylor Nichols), the group's obvious book-smart member who hates that Tom is as smart as him yet seems not to boast about it so much. We follow the film through winter break as the group attends several different social events, which include a verbal stand-off between Rick and Nick and Tom's slow drift from Serena to Audrey.

Continue reading: Metropolitan Review

The Next Big Thing Review


Good
The art gallery world gets a decent comedic prod in this new film by writer/director brothers P.J. and Joel Posner. Set amongst the spoiled and the starving in New York, The Next Big Thing pits artistic intelligence against a pleasantly simple love story, all centering around independent favorite Chris Eigeman (The Last Days of Disco).

Eigeman is Gus, who starts out the film having the worst possible day. On his way to an important meeting, battered portfolio in hand, his wallet is swiped by a swindler escaping from subway havoc. The interview goes poorly with gallery owner Arthur Pomposello (an unrecognizable Farley Granger, of beloved Hitchcock fame) because Gus just doesn't "catch you." His shading shows talent and his composition is pleasant to look at, but he doesn't display the normal despondence and stereotypical artistic pain seen in his peers.

Continue reading: The Next Big Thing Review

Highball Review


Good
Noah Baumbach gathered up his Kicking and Screaming and Mr. Jealousy buddies and threw together this little flick in six days. He then stuck an alias (Ernie Fusco) on it, and that was about it. Mostly consisting of recycled jokes that didn't make it into his earlier films, Highball is still frequently funny while it's perpetually random. Gotta love Carlos Jacott no matter what he does, though. And extra points for creative use of two giant lizard suits.

Kicking And Screaming (1995) Review


Excellent
Opening night of the Austin Film Festival and Screenwriters' Conference brought me this little gem, a story of five guys who just got out of college, the three women that float amongst them, and the question that haunts them all, "What the hell am I going to do with my life?"

I wouldn't look to Kicking and Screaming for the answer. Rather, the movie is a hilarious example of what not to do when you graduate. The guys, Chet (Eric Stoltz), Grover (Josh Hamilton), Max (Chris Eigeman), Skippy (Jason Wiles), and the show-stealing Otis (Carlos Jacott), can't seem to give up the college life. They hang out at college bars, woo freshmen, and sneak back into classes. Otis can't even seem to get out of his pajamas.

Continue reading: Kicking And Screaming (1995) Review

The Last Days Of Disco Review


OK
I've been a fan of Whit Stillman since his first film, Metropolitan, in 1990. It was therefore with no small amount of anticipation that I journeyed to see his third film, The Last Days of Disco.

Of course, when I get worked up over a movie, I'm always disappointed. Sadly, Disco was no exception.

Continue reading: The Last Days Of Disco Review

Mr. Jealousy Review


Excellent
The long-overdue follow-up to Noah Baumbach's brilliant Kicking and Screaming, Mr. Jealousy is another look at a not-so-gracefully aging Generation X and its travails with relationships. Eric Stoltz stars as that typical Stoltz character with surprising effectiveness. A flawed but very entertaining character study.
Chris Eigeman

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Chris Eigeman Movies

Arbitrage Movie Review

Arbitrage Movie Review

Richard Gere delivers such a charming, layered performance that he overcomes a contrived plot that...

Arbitrage Trailer

Arbitrage Trailer

Robert Miller is billionaire hedge fund businessman who at first glance seems to have the...

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Maid In Manhattan Movie Review

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