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Chris Cooper - The New York premiere of August: Osage County held at the Ziegfeld Theatre - Arrivals. - New York, New York, United States - Thursday 12th December 2013

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Chris Cooper - AFI FEST 2013 Presented By Audi - "August Osage County" Premiere at TCL Chinese Theatre - Hollywood, California, United States - Saturday 9th November 2013

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Chris Cooper
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Chris Cooper

Chris Cooper - 17th Annual Hollywood Film Awards held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, CA. 21-10-2013 - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Monday 21st October 2013

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Chris Cooper
Chris Cooper, Margo Martindale and Dermot Mulroney
Chris Cooper, Margo Martindale and Dermot Mulroney
Chris Cooper

Chris Cooper - Toronto International Film Festival - 'August: Osage County' - Premiere - Toronto, Canada - Tuesday 10th September 2013

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Chris Cooper

Chris Cooper - August Osage County premiere at Roy Thomson Hall during the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival. - Toronto, Canada - Monday 9th September 2013

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Chris Cooper

Chris Cooper Saturday 12th November 2011 The premiere of Walt Disney Pictures' 'The Muppets' at the El Capitan Theatre - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

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Muppets and Chris Cooper

The Muppets Trailer


Underneath the famous Muppet Theatre, oil has been discovered. Tex Richman, an oilman, finds out and plans to demolish the theatre so he can start drilling. Walter, Gary and Mary are three friends who also happen to be huge fans of The Muppets. They plan to stage what they call 'The Greatest Muppet Telethon Ever', so they can raise $10 million to stop the destruction of the Muppet Theatre.

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The Tempest Review


Good
After Titus, Taymor brings her unique perspective to another Shakespeare classic, although this movie feels oddly stage-bound, indulging in theatricality in both the design and performances. It's a great story, but this feels a little forced.

It's been 12 years since Prospera (Mirren) and her daughter Miranda (Jones) were banished from their homeland, so Prospera orchestrates a storm to maroon her tormenters on her island home. With the help of sprite Arial (Whishaw), she divides them into three groups: the king (Straithairn) and his brother (Cumming), along with Prospera's brother (Cooper) and wise Gonzalo (Conti), are lost in madness; the wacky Trinculo and Stephano (Brand and Molina) meet up with slave Caliban (Hounsou) and run in circles; and the king's son Ferdinand (Carney) is diverted to meet Miranda.

Continue reading: The Tempest Review

New York, I Love You Review


Very Good
There are 11 captivating short films in this anthology, the second in the Cities of Love series by producers Benbihy and Grasic. But this collection isn't quite as varied or engaging as Paris Je T'Aime.

All of these stories take place in Manhattan, with only one or two brief forays into other boroughs, and they all centre around relatively well-off people, mainly white or Asian. They're also quite serious and emotional, with only brief moments of humour dotted here and there, although some make us smile more than others. Each is about a male-female relationship--marriages, brief encounters, possibilities, life-long companionship. Most have a somewhat gimmicky twist, and a few are intriguingly oblique.

Continue reading: New York, I Love You Review

Chris Cooper Tuesday 11th January 2011 The 63rd National Board of Review of Motion Pictures Gala, held at Cipriani 42nd Street - Arrivals New York City, USA

Chris Cooper
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Chris Cooper
Chris Cooper
Chris Cooper
Chris Cooper

The Town Review


Excellent
Ben Affleck confirms his directing skills with this sharply made thriller, which carefully maintains a human connection with its characters. It's an astutely observed story, finely told by both cast and crew.

The Charlestown neighbourhood in Boston is a notorious home for bank robbers, and Doug (Affleck) leads fiendishly efficient heists with his brother-like pal Jem (Renner), driver Albert (Slaine) and techie Des (Burke). But Jem's trigger-happy temper almost undoes the last job when he briefly takes bank manager Claire (Hall) hostage. To make sure she's not going to turn them in to tenacious FBI Agent Frawley (Hamm), Doug gets to know her. And of course falls in love, finally seeing a way out of this dodgy life.

Continue reading: The Town Review

Chris Cooper Tuesday 14th September 2010 Premiere of 'The Town' at Fenway Park Boston, USA

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Chris Cooper
Chris Cooper

Chris Cooper - Chris Cooper signing autographs as he arrives at the press conference of his new film 'The Town' Toronto, Canada - Celebrities at the 35th Toronto International Film Festival 2010 - Day 2 Friday 10th September 2010

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Chris Cooper

Chris Cooper Friday 10th September 2010 The 35th Toronto International Film Festival - 'The Town' press conference held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel. Toronto, Canada

Chris Cooper

The Town Trailer


Doug Macray is a professional thief. His gang are one of the best and most successful of their kind. Bank robberies is their general area of interest and in all the years they've been in the business they've kept a clean record and never been caught, part of their success is down to the lack of attachments. Their latest heist is at a bank where they end up taking the bank manager called Claire hostage. Eventually the robbers let the woman go but she's left unnerved by her experience. In the days following her experience, she meets a man called Doug, he seems unassuming and friendly and she's taken in by his seemingly charming personality. Their relationship begins to grow but Claire is unaware of Doug's dark side, he was one of the men who took Claire hostage.

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Chris Cooper Monday 1st March 2010 New York premiere of 'Remember Me' at the Paris Theatre New York City, USA

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Chris Cooper

Remember Me Trailer


Watch the trailer for Remember Me

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Where The Wild Things Are Review


Excellent
Jonze's inventive approach to Maurice Sendak's classic children's book continually confounds our expectations with an approach that's so offhanded and fresh that it might feel awkward or strange. But it's a real grower.

Max (Records) is a mischievous, imaginative pre-teen with a dismissive big sister (Emmerichs) and an understanding mum (Keener). But a series of events get him thinking about the fragility of life, so he takes a flight of fantasy to a distant island populated by furry creatures who at first threaten to eat him but then adopt him as their king. Playful games ensue, as he leads them in the construction of a giant fortress. But even here, relationships become tricky to navigate.

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Where The Wild Things Are Trailer


Watch the Alternative Trailer for new Spike Jonze Movie Where The Wild Things Are

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Chris Cooper Thursday 16th July 2009 on the set of her new film 'Remember Me' New York City, USA

Chris Cooper

Chris Cooper Thursday 2nd July 2009 on the set of his new film 'Remember Me' shooting on location in Manhattan New York City, USA

Chris Cooper
Chris Cooper

Married Life Trailer


Watch the trailer for Married Life.

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Married Life Review


Good
Married Life, a new film from director Ira Sachs, feels very much like a film from a different era -- a fact that's mostly enjoyable, with a few minor exceptions. Set in the late 1940s, presumably in and around New York City, Married Life tells the story of Harry Allen (Chris Cooper), a wealthy businessman who one day confesses to his old friend Richard (Pierce Brosnan) that he intends to leave his wife and take up with his mistress. Complications arise when Harry decides the only way out of his marriage is to murder his wife, while at the same time his pal Richard goes behind his back and courts the affection of his mistress.

What's pleasurable about this film, and the way the story unfolds, is its elegant simplicity. No more than ten minutes into the movie, Sachs and his co-screenwriter Oren Moverman have skillfully limned each of the main characters' hopes and ambitions and set in motion the levers of conflict that drive the story forward. Harry wants to experience the type of romantic love that has long since vanished, if it ever existed, from his marriage with Pat (Patricia Clarkson), while she, for her part, longs for greater passion and the adolescent thrill of sex. Kay (Rachel McAdams), Harry's mistress, seeks true love for the second time after losing her husband in World War II, and Richard, a womanizing bachelor, hopes to discover the ability to form an emotional connection with a woman.

Continue reading: Married Life Review

The Kingdom (2007) Review


Weak
Peter Berg's The Kingdom will either rally those in the theater or piss off every single ticket holder in sight. It's gonna be awesome. Indeed, sardonic catcalls of "kill all the towelheads!" were shouted at the press screening I attended while the rest of the theater applauded with rigorous aplomb as Jennifer Garner jammed a knife into a Saudi terrorist's nether regions. This was all preceded by some daft bollock yammering on his cellphone during the opening credits while another patron quietly threatened castration. Only in New York, ladies and gents.

Why will people be so divisive, you ask? Well, in The Kingdom, a compound of Americans in the Saudi Arabia capital of Riyadh are bombed. Subsequently, the reaction team, led by Agent Manner (Kyle Chandler), falls victim to a much larger, hidden bomb that is disguised as an ambulance gurney. Berg employs Jamie Foxx to seduce, threaten, and charm his way into Saudi airspace as Agent Fleury, fighting to get his team of quickdraws into Riyadh to get all forensic with the crime scene. No such luck, Honcho: Seems that the local fuzz won't have any of it and keep a real vice on Fleury and his team's "oo-rah" attitude. That is until Prince Thamer gives tactical command over to the pandering Colonel Faris Al Ghazi (Ashraf Barhom), who sees eye-to-eye with the FBI team and their American-outlaw brand of badassery.

Continue reading: The Kingdom (2007) Review

Chris Cooper Monday 17th September 2007 The Kingdom Premiere - Arrivals held at Mann's Village Westwood Westwood, California USA

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Chris Cooper

The Kingdom Trailer


Academy Award winner Jamie Foxx leads an all-star ensemble in a timely thriller that tracks a powder-keg criminal investigation shared by two cultures chasing a deadly enemy ready to strike again in The Kingdom.

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Ryan Phillippe, Director Billy Ray and Chris Cooper - Ryan Phillippe, Director Billy Ray and Chris Cooper Edinburgh, Scotland - Edinburgh International Film Festival 2007 - Screening of 'Breach' Thursday 23rd August 2007

Ryan Phillippe, Director Billy Ray and Chris Cooper
Ryan Phillippe, Director Of The Film Festival Hannah Mcgill, Director Billy Ray and Chris Cooper

Chris Cooper - Monday 21st May 2007 at The Hudson Theatre New York City, USA

Chris Cooper

Breach Review


Very Good
Moving briskly from equivocator Stephen Glass to the chairman of the Benedict Arnold Fan Club, Robert Hanssen, director Billy Ray turns his tonal focus from Shattered Glass's journalistic felony to high crime in the intelligence agency. In what seems to be a new trend of cinematically capturing events before they have actually played out, Breach reenacts what is widely accepted as the greatest fracture of FBI security in the history of the organization.

Following possible terrorists and their contacts, Eric O'Neil (Ryan Phillipe) eagerly tries to discuss bureau protocol with his team, only to be ignored and have his well-prepared report on the subject shoved back in his face. That is, until he is dragged into a bureau conference room on a Sunday to meet with his superior and head agent Kate Burroughs (Laura Linney). It's here that O'Neil is asked to shadow Russian intelligence specialist Robert Hanssen (Chris Cooper) for what is originally agreed to be sexually perverse activities. It isn't till O'Neil is taken under wing by the intelligence expert that Burroughs reveals that Hanssen has actually been selling information to the Russians for some time and has cost the government billions of dollars and uncountable agent lives.

Continue reading: Breach Review

Syriana Review


Good
Never send a writer to do a director's job. That, more than the addictive evils of easy oil and cozy government/business corruption, is the true lesson of Syriana. When Steven Soderbergh took on Stephen Gaghan's byzantine script for Traffic, he utilized a few simple tricks to keep it all making sense, everything from grouping stories by color scheme to casting vivid character actors for minor roles so that they wouldn't get lost in the shuffle. Gaghan doesn't have these skills to bring to bear and though he beats his sprawling epic somewhat into shape, it leaves one wishing for the film that could have been, given a better director.

Like Traffic, Syriana is a messy Gordian knot of plot, only with no Soderbergh to slice it neatly open. Instead of drug trafficking, the subject this time is the nexus where oil corporations, the U.S. government, Islamic extremism, and Middle East dictatorships come together in an unholy fusion of polity and greed. The characters are introduced at a leisurely pace, Gaghan laying it all out with perhaps a little too much care. Once things start to cohere, the film shunts into a political thriller about an unnamed Gulf State where the ailing king's two sons are jockeying for control; one is a lazy playboy beloved by U.S. interests and the other is an educated reformer who wants to modernize his country and stop kowtowing to the west.

Continue reading: Syriana Review

Jarhead Review


Excellent
From the quiet perch of the homeland, Operation Desert Storm was an anti-climactic blowout. Billed by Saddam Hussein as the "Mother of All Battles," it looked an awful lot like a rout by American air power followed by a hasty Iraqi retreat from Kuwait.

The experience of Marines on the ground, however, bore little resemblance to the precision bombing the public saw on CNN. For the men of the Corps, life in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait consisted of disgust, boredom, foreboding, anxiety, and blinding fear, a toxic combination that made for one of the best reads of 2004, Anthony Swofford's memoir Jarhead.

Continue reading: Jarhead Review

Great Expectations Review


Weak
You know, I didn't like the book Great Expectations when I was in high school, so I don't know why anyone thought it would be liked any better now. Hawke's meddling with the story is well-documented (including changing the main character's name from Pip to Finn). Then there's the updating to the 20th century, making Pip, er, Finn an artist (and a bad one at that), Bancroft's horrific drag-queenish dance instructor. De Niro's lost expression. Ugh. I'll take the book over this.

Seabiscuit Review


Extraordinary
Regular readers know (or are expected to know) that I enjoy only two sports: boxing and horse racing. Sadly, movies about these two subjects almost always suck, probably having something to do with the fact that most of boxing's competitors are egomaniacal sociopaths and that the typical horse race lasts for only two minutes.

And so we come to Seabiscuit, the true story of a small, unruly race horse of great breeding but poor disposition who found himself sold for scrap. Despite his attitude, he eventually became one of the greatest racers in history. (Believe it or not there's already been one Seabiscuit-inspired movie... the first one starring Shirley Temple.)

Continue reading: Seabiscuit Review

Adaptation Review


Excellent
Wrap your noodle around this one. Real-life screenwriter Charlie Kaufman (Being John Malkovich; Human Nature) writes a screenplay about screenwriter Charlie Kaufman (Nicolas Cage) writing a screenplay adaptation of a real-life book, The Orchid Thief, written by real-life author Susan Orlean (played in Adaptation by Meryl Streep).

Thus spake Adaptation. Starting out with fake (or real?) behind-the-scenes footage of Malkovich, taking detours to the dawn of life on earth and story mogul Robert McKee's screenwriting class, Darwin's lab, Orlean's book (with Chris Cooper playing the swamp rat/scientist/orchid thief himself), voice-overs, and flashbacks, Adaptation finds inventive convolutions that might make it seem more esoteric than it really is.

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October Sky Review


Very Good
This true story (well, based on one anyway) tells the tale of Homer Hickam, a go-nowhere coal miner's son who, in the late 1950s, decides to take up amateur rocketry for no discernable reason. Secretly, this is a movie about overcoming adversity and fatherly love, and the sentiment is heaped on so high you can't help but shed a tear. Stand By Me meets The Right Stuff.

Me, Myself & Irene Review


Excellent
After just missing Oscar gold with performances in The Truman Show and Man on the Moon, Jim Carrey returns to the dramatic form for a third bid at the little statue with a heart-rending performance as a victim of split-personality disorder in the soulful drama Me, Myself & Irene.

Yeah, and Adam Sandler is a gifted thespian. With their long-awaited follow-up to There's Something About Mary, the Farrelly brothers return to their specialty -- gross-out shenanigans -- in this equally funny entry into their oeuvre of perversion.

Continue reading: Me, Myself & Irene Review

American Beauty Review


Extraordinary
At last, a movie with no likable characters that is nothing short of a joy to watch. Let's see if American Psycho can top that!

American Beauty chronicles the last year in the life of 42 year-old hack magazine writer Lester Burnham (Spacey), a suburban loser that has just about had it with his humdrum life and decides to make a few changes to regain control, for better or for worse. Those changes include quitting his job and blackmailing his employers, buying a vintage Firebird, taking a new job at the local fast food joint, buying thousands of dollars worth of pot, and plotting to sleep with his daughter's best friend (Suvari, the good girl from American Pie, playing the bad girl here).

Continue reading: American Beauty Review

The Ring Review


Extraordinary
There's something inherently creepy about children and the supernatural. Poltergeist knew it. The Sixth Sense knew it, too. Both movies make their presence known in The Ring, though I wouldn't necessarily use them - or anything else - to describe this remarkably original and terrifying ghost tale.

Following a number of false starts that establish the film's unbalanced mood, The Ring rehashes an urban legend about a videotape. Very few people know its contents, though it's believed that the images found on the tape recap one person's nightmare. Initially I thought that tape was Police Academy 5: Assignment Miami Beach, but I was wrong. Once you watch the video, the phone rings and a child's voice on the other end of the line whispers, "Seven days." You now have one week to live.

Continue reading: The Ring Review

The Patriot Review


Excellent
A note to filmmakers who want to make a movie about a war: Please understand that your film does not need to be as long as the actual war itself. We will not hold it against you if it's shorter. As such, I will try to keep this review to a length where you can read it in a few minutes.

The Patriot gives Mel Gibson the opportunity to do something he's never done before: To orate at length about the evils of taxation without representation... oh, okay... and to kill a bunch of damn redcoats!!!

Continue reading: The Patriot Review

Lone Star Review


Good
Lone Star can be simply described as an incredible mess.

John Sayles, darling of the indie film movement, has created this picture, an epic study of racial tension in mythical Frontera, Texas, a border town in the Rio Grande Valley. (The film was actually shot in Eagle Pass, quite a ways upriver from the Valley.) Set against the backdrop of a son investigating his father's involvement in the murder of a sheriff some 40 years earlier, Sayles wanders, Short Cuts-like, through the lives of 15 or so major characters.

Continue reading: Lone Star Review

Capote Review


Excellent
Capturing the inspirational process of a quirky character can be a daunting task. You have to weigh informational material with a big personality, and keep these two balanced over the course of a changing story without getting bogged down with proving a truth or allowing an actor to get so overwhelming that you miss the entire point of the film.

Hence why Philip Seymour Hoffman is such a perfect choice to play Truman Capote in a film about the research that became the book In Cold Blood. Not only does he look like him and sound like him, but because Capote was such an enormous personality in his own right, the smallest glimpse into Hoffman's movements or talk speaks volumes. He conveys so much with so little, and he's able to provide an amazing performance of the four years it took to write his biggest seller.

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The Horse Whisperer Review


Weak
An atrocity in the grand history of films like The Bridges of Madison County. This is yet another grown-up romance, overblown, sappy, sentimental, and just plain stupid -- featuring Redford as a guy who is strangely in tune with horsies. Yee haw! Turn off your brain before you watch it.

The Bourne Identity Review


Good

There's nothing more satisfying during a summer of event movies than to discover a spy thriller like "The Bourne Identity" that's packed with just as much intelligence as action.

Adapted from the slick and savvy novel by the late Robert Ludlum (whose two sequels are waiting in the wings), the picture stars Matt Damon in a sharply focused performance as a mysterious man found floating in the Mediterranean Sea with two bullet holes in his back and a wicked case of amnesia.

He speaks several languages ("Stop messing around and tell me who I am," he admonishes himself in a mirror in German and French). He possessed lethal instincts and martial arts skills, which he discovers much to his own surprise when he takes down two police officers who harass him after he's come ashore in Prague. He knows somebody with a lot of clandestine power is trying to kill him, and his only clue to their identity and his own is a tiny laser pen found embedded under his skin that projects an account number at a Swiss bank -- where he discovers a safe deposit box packed with cash, forged passports and a gun.

Continue reading: The Bourne Identity Review

The Ring Review


Weak

"The Ring" opens with a scene straight out of a teen horror movie: A high school girl is trying to scare a friend with the supposedly true story of a haunted videotape -- if you watch it, you die in seven days.

The other girl turns white as a sheet, not because the story scares her, but because she's actually seen the tape -- seven days before.

What follows is an chilling five minutes of eerie goings-on in which director Gore Verbinski ("The Mexican") skillfully winds the audience up like a jack-in-the-box, then sets us jumping at his pleasure with the simplest scare-movie tricks. A TV turns on to static, by itself, immediately after being turned off -- and unplugged. The phone rings menacingly. One girl searches for the other, sees water leaking out from under the bathroom door and s-l-o-w-l-y reaches for the knob.

Continue reading: The Ring Review

Adaptation Review


Excellent

Poking around in the mind of John Malkovich was a wonderfully weird, wildly conceptual experience in 1999's "Being John Malkovich," but the ingenious "Adaptation" is a testament to the fact that screenwriter Charlie Kaufman's head is an even more peculiar place.

Kaufman is the off-kilter mastermind behind both films, and while the former was a dark, cerebellum-warping, fictional funhouse ride, the latter began life simply as a commission to adapt Susan Orleans' novel "The Orchid Thief." What the project morphed into, however, is something far more bizarre because Kaufman's unbridled and bewildered efforts to turn the book into a movie began bleeding into the screenplay itself.

In the deft and innovative hands of "Malkovich" director Spike Jonze, three cross-pollinating narratives are stitched together in an extraordinary patchwork of idiosyncratic storytelling: First, the film follows the plot of "The Orchid Thief," which is, in part, about the misfiring conservation philosophies of a real Florida flower poacher named John Laroche (Chris Cooper), who took Orleans (Meryl Streep) into the Everglades on excursions to steal protected orchids that he then breeds to sell in his flower shop.

Continue reading: Adaptation Review

Seabiscuit Review


Very Good

Making a genuinely stirring, unabashedly all-American feel-good movie -- the kind that makes you want to stand up and cheer -- has to be one of the most difficult, precision tasks in modern cinema. But writer-director Gary Ross beautifully sidesteps contemporary cynicism in "Seabiscuit," a film that invokes the warm, gratifying, can-do spirit of the uplifting films that once helped people forget the Great Depression two hours at a time.

The miracle success story of a too-small steed and his too-large jockey who together came to dominate and popularize horse racing in the late 1930s, the film is a metaphor for the underdog hope of the era that it captures so transportingly.

Adapted by Ross ("Pleasantville") from the acclaimed book by Laura Hillenbrand, the picture gets off to a unconventional start with a rambling 20-minute prologue -- narrated by David McCullough, the compassionate voice of Ken Burns' PBS documentaries -- that gallops through both general history (the Model T Ford, the stock market crash, prohibition) and detailed backstory (early owners deemed Seabiscuit too diminutive, lazy and willful to be a champion) while trying to look like it's trotting along at a laid-back canter.

Continue reading: Seabiscuit Review

Silver City Review


Good

The most deadpan, dead-on, sharply focused political satire in recent memory, "Silver City" methodically skewers George W. Bush (by proxy), the spineless corporate press (and their mistrustful underground adversaries), the billion-dollar candidate-making machinery of modern politics, and the general gullibility of the voting public -- all within the inimitable interlocking-ensemble narrative style of writer-director John Sayles.

Set in Colorado during the current election cycle, the plot circles a dozen-odd characters around a political scandal in the making, set in motion by the discovery of a corpse during the filming of a gubernatorial campaign ad. The candidate is Dickie Pilager, an inarticulately folksy, uncorrupt but "user-friendly" son of a powerful ex-senator -- played to tongue-tied, Bush-mimicking exactitude by the subtly superlative Chris Cooper ("Adaptation," "The Bourne Identity," "American Beauty").

Pilager's merciless attack-dog campaign manager (Richard Dreyfuss, channeling Bush puppet-master Karl Rove), convinced his candidate is being set up for something sinister, hires a private investigator to intimidate a handful of potential saboteurs, including a spurned arch-conservative radio-show host (Miguel Ferrer) and Pilager's hard-living, black-sheep sister, played with delicious volatility by Daryl Hannah. But what he doesn't know is that his stooge (the complex, understated Danny Huston from "21 Grams" and "ivans xtc.") is a disgraced, disenchanted and depressed ex-loose-cannon newspaper reporter.

Continue reading: Silver City Review

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Chris Cooper Movies

Cars 3 Movie Review

Cars 3 Movie Review

It's been six years since the last Cars movie (there were two Planes movies in...

Cars 3 Trailer

Cars 3 Trailer

Former Piston Cup Champion Lightning McQueen was a hero in his day, but it seems...

Live By Night Movie Review

Live By Night Movie Review

Ben Affleck launched his directing career 10 years ago with his film of Dennis Lehane's...

Live By Night Trailer

Live By Night Trailer

Joe Coughlin was born and raised in a good family, his father was the police...

Demolition Movie Review

Demolition Movie Review

With its darkly emotive themes and brittle humour, this well-made drama by Jean-Marc Vallee (Dallas...

Demolition Trailer

Demolition Trailer

Davis Mitchell is very successful in what he does for a living, though he's not...

The Amazing Spider-man 2 Movie Review

The Amazing Spider-man 2 Movie Review

As with the too-early franchise reboot in 2012, this sequel struggles to balance the demands...

The Amazing Spiderman 2 - Clips Trailer

The Amazing Spiderman 2 - Clips Trailer

Peter Parker is facing a period of deep confusion in every aspect of his life....

August: Osage County Movie Review

August: Osage County Movie Review

Tracy Letts adapts his own prize-winning play into a blistering depiction of one of cinema's...

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 Trailer

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 Trailer

Peter Parker has always had difficulty trying to prioritise his life. There's the personal side...

August: Osage County Trailer

August: Osage County Trailer

The Weston family know they are probably one of the most dysfunctional families around, but...

The Company You Keep Trailer

The Company You Keep Trailer

Ben Shepard is a young and ambitious reporter determined to make a name for himself...

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