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'Mrs Doubtfire' Sequel? Robin Williams To Don Wig And Fake Boobs Once More!


Robin Williams Sally Field Chris Columbus Mara Wilson Pierce Brosnan

Robin Williams is set to reprise his role in the surprise sequel to the 1993 comedy, Mrs. Doubtfire, which will reportedly be directed by the original's Chris Columbus, according to THR. 21 years after the original movie, the news of a Mrs. Doubtfire sequel has come as an unexpected albeit welcome surprise for many fans of the '90s hit.

Robin Williams
Robin Williams Will Return To His Lauded 'Mrs. Doubfire' Comedy Role For A Sequel.

Fox 2000 has tapped Elf writer David Berenbaum to write the sequel with Robin Williams attached to reprise his starring role as divorcee Daniel Hillard, who devises an outrageous plan to work his way back into his hostile wife (Sally Field) and children's lives. After creating an elaborate old lady costume and styling himself as the pleasant Scottish nanny, Mrs. Euphegenia Doubtfire, he gets himself hired as a housekeeper and nanny to his own children.

Continue reading: 'Mrs Doubtfire' Sequel? Robin Williams To Don Wig And Fake Boobs Once More!

'The Goonies' Director, Richard Donner, Unofficially Confirms A Sequel Is In The Works


Richard Donner Sean Astin Josh Brolin Corey Feldman Martha Plimpton Steven Spielberg Chris Columbus Kerri Green Jeff Cohen

Director Richard Donner announced to an unsuspecting photographer that he is making a sequel to the hit 1985 children's adventure film, The Goonies.

Richard Donner
Richard Donner with his wife Lauren Shuler Donner at an AFI event honouring Mel Brooks in 2013.

Donner was signing autographs in Beverly Hills when a photographer bombarded him with a series of questions regarding comic book and superhero films, but Donner took the opportunity to express his interest in making The Goonies 2. Although there have been rumours circulating about the possibility of a sequel to the children's classic, this is the first time it appears to have been unofficially confirmed by the director.

Continue reading: 'The Goonies' Director, Richard Donner, Unofficially Confirms A Sequel Is In The Works

The Help Review


Excellent
A strongly issue-based story gives a terrific cast plenty to play with in this hugely engaging drama about the American South in the 1960s. And while the film kind of skims the surface, it's a story that still needs to be told.

After graduating from university, Skeeter (Stone) returns home to Jackson, Mississippi, to seek work as a journalist. But one theme from her childhood haunts her: the maid (Tyson) who actually raised her. But her similarly raised close friends (Howard, O'Reilly and Camp) now take their own maids for granted, and Skeeter wonders why this story has never been told from the help's point of view. After finding an interested New York editor (Steenburgen), it takes awhile to convince Aibileen (Davis) to tell her story, especially as both know it will upset the status quo.

Continue reading: The Help Review

Night At The Museum: Battle Of The Smithsonian Review


Weak
Shawn Levy has no soul. Perhaps put another way, he is one of the few filmmakers working today who lacks the requisite motion picture magic to make his fantastical ideas sing. Now that's nothing new to anyone who's seen his hamfisted hackwork in such incoherent remake comedies as Cheaper by the Dozen and The Pink Panther. He's also the Nachos, Flanders Style of visionaries, unable to bring a lick of wonder to his tedious kid flick Night at the Museum. Now he's back with another baffling, sure-to-be crowd pleaser, and while Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian has much better effects than the prior outing, the story -- and some of the casting -- seems geared toward destroying any amount of visual goodwill accrued.

It's been a few years since Larry Daley (Ben Stiller) worked as a night watchman at the Museum of Natural History in New York. He has since become a highly successful infomercial pitchman. When he learns from the statue of Teddy Roosevelt (Robin Williams) that most of his favorite exhibits, including the miniatures of cowboy Jedediah Smith (Owen Wilson) and Roman Emperor Octavius (Steve Coogan), are being "decommissioned" and taken to the Federal Archive in DC, he's sad. A late night phone call from his "friends" has him headed to the nation's capital and breaking into the Smithsonian. There, he discovers Kahmunrah (Hank Azaria), evil brother of Ahkmenrah (Rami Malek), who wants a fabled golden tablet so he can take over the world. With the help of Gen. Custer (Bill Hader) and Amelia Earhart (Amy Adams), Larry must stop the resurrected despot and save the day.

Continue reading: Night At The Museum: Battle Of The Smithsonian Review

Jingle All The Way Review


Bad
Jingle All the Way, the Christmas-themed 1996 Arnold Schwarzenegger comedy, is ideal for kids because it's broad and silly. As for the adults watching, they should make sure their eggnog contains a little extra rum. I understand that the movie is for kids -- after all, Christmas is the ultimate kids' holiday -- but can the adults have some fun? For director Brian Levant the answer is no, meaning any viewer over the age of 10 is in for some rough sledding.

For the movie's hero, Howard Langston (Schwarzenegger), his current situation is slightly less trying. A workaholic, Howard has become a lousy husband and father, missing a series of obligations and special events. His young son, Jamie (Jake Lloyd), takes Howard's absences especially hard.

Continue reading: Jingle All The Way Review

Fantastic Four: Rise Of The Silver Surfer Review


Good
The NBA hands out a Most Improved Player Award at the end of each season. Hollywood does not have an equivalent distinction, though Fantastic Four director Tim Story would be a worthy candidate for this year's prize if it did.

Story's name was attached to the original Four film in 2005, but that discombobulated blockbuster based on the classic Marvel Comic books felt like meddling producers suggested the film to pieces before the finished product reached theaters. Critics and comic fans responded in kind with opinions that were not so kind, but Four turned a large enough profit to secure a punched ticket to sequel land for Story and his cast.

Continue reading: Fantastic Four: Rise Of The Silver Surfer Review

Nine Months Review


Good
Nine Months has all the makings of an incredible disaster. First, its star (Hugh Grant) is arrested for lewd conduct. Second, it's a remake of a French film (Neuf Mois), always a huge negative. Finally, it's a comedy decidedly for adults which is directed by the infantile Chris Columbus, the man who brought us the Home Alone franchise and Mrs. Doubtfire.

Imagine my shock; Nine Months is pretty good.

Continue reading: Nine Months Review

Night At The Museum Review


Weak
Right around the time a monkey urinates on Ben Stiller's head, I came to terms with the fact that Shawn Levy's high-concept comedy Night at the Museum would choose the lowest road possible as it searched for scatological humor.

That Levy -- the pandering director responsible for this year's atrociously unnecessary Pink Panther installment -- would stoop to such levels doesn't surprise me. No, I'm more upset that it took me so long to begrudgingly accept that what could have been inspired fluff for the whole family is, in fact, is a silly parade of slapstick antics aimed at audience members age eight and under.

Continue reading: Night At The Museum Review

Rent Review


Excellent
Whatever happened to the glut of movie musicals that the success of Moulin Rouge and Chicago was supposed to have unleashed upon us? Although the door for the long-moribund genre was indeed nudged open by those films, it fortunately never opened wide enough to subject us to the like of Mamma Mia! The Film or Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: Reloaded. Instead, studios have been fairly scrupulous about what they'll let through, and with the arrival of Rent, that's proved to be a good thing.

When Chris "Mrs. Doubtfire" Columbus was announced as the director of the evergreen 1996 rock musical - which updated Puccini's starving-artists opera La Bohème to the East Village in the late 1980s - it seemed like a bad joke. Spike Lee and Martin Scorsese had been buzzing around the project for years and getting the show's fans all excited, only to run into the usual budget/artistic/Miramax problems, not to mention a cast that was slowly getting past its prime. Handing the play over to the family-friendly Columbus seemed like admitting that the subject matter - a welter of squatting artists, homosexuality, heroin addiction, AIDS, and untimely deaths - was going to get watered down. Somehow, that didn't happen. While he's made the musical considerably cinematic, Columbus has also shown a surprising appreciation and fidelity to the source material; he should have tried directing something without children years ago.

Continue reading: Rent Review

Rent Review


Excellent
Whatever happened to the glut of movie musicals that the success of Moulin Rouge and Chicago was supposed to have unleashed upon us? Although the door for the long-moribund genre was indeed nudged open by those films, it fortunately never opened wide enough to subject us to the like of Mamma Mia! The Film or Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: Reloaded. Instead, studios have been fairly scrupulous about what they'll let through, and with the arrival of Rent, that's proved to be a good thing.

When Chris "Mrs. Doubtfire" Columbus was announced as the director of the evergreen 1996 rock musical - which updated Puccini's starving-artists opera La Bohème to the East Village in the late 1980s - it seemed like a bad joke. Spike Lee and Martin Scorsese had been buzzing around the project for years and getting the show's fans all excited, only to run into the usual budget/artistic/Miramax problems, not to mention a cast that was slowly getting past its prime. Handing the play over to the family-friendly Columbus seemed like admitting that the subject matter - a welter of squatting artists, homosexuality, heroin addiction, AIDS, and untimely deaths - was going to get watered down. Somehow, that didn't happen. While he's made the musical considerably cinematic, Columbus has also shown a surprising appreciation and fidelity to the source material; he should have tried directing something without children years ago.

Continue reading: Rent Review

Monkeybone Review


Terrible
Despite Fox's attempts to market this film on the coattails of director Henry Selick's success with Tim Burton vehicle The Nightmare Before Christmas, be thou not fooled. Monkeybone bears none of the charm or character of its predecessor. The story of a cartoonist (Brendan Fraser) who falls into a coma and enters a world where the star he created, Monkeybone (who is -- get this -- both a monkey and a metaphor for the cartoonist's own penis), this film lacks as much in the way of creative inspiration as it does in taste.

It's not that the unending stream of preschoolish fart and pecker jokes are offensive, they're just tiresome and invariably expected. And they persist, from the opening scene to the entirely unsurprising conclusion. Fortunately, though, the film has some subplots. Unfortunately, they're absolutely senseless.

Continue reading: Monkeybone Review

Young Sherlock Holmes Review


Excellent
Want to see the origins of the Harry Potter movies? Check out Barry Levinson's enchanting Young Sherlock Holmes, believe it or not.

Written by Chris Columbus (who'd later go on to direct the first two Potters), our titular hero (Nicholas Rowe) displays incredible intelligence and wit as he muddles his way through a private, British institution of learning. With his pals -- a goofy kid named Watson (Alan Cox) and a curly-haired girl (Sophie Ward) -- Holmes gets into trouble and finds his way into a giant mystery that threatens the whole world. When he uncovers the villain, it's someone much closer than he'd ever imagined.

Continue reading: Young Sherlock Holmes Review

Bicentennial Man Review


Good
Robin Williams wants -- and needs -- nothing more than to have his own The Truman Show -- a Hail Mary to ward off permanent stereotyping. Typecast as a goofy loudmouth in throwaway films ranging from Mrs. Doubtfire to Fathers' Day to Flubber, you have to look back all the way to The Fisher King in 1991 for his last great starring role.

Bicentennial Man aims to turn that all around by making Williams something we can relate to once again. Ironically, that's not as a human: It's as a robot.

Continue reading: Bicentennial Man Review

Cheaper By The Dozen Review


Weak
Can someone please pull Steve Martin's career out of the past? Once wild and crazy, Martin's now mild and lazy, a cookie-cutter comedian content to milk mediocre laughs out of reheated remakes of classic flicks. Results vary. Martin's Father of the Bride stayed sweet, while his updated The Out-of-Towners struck a surprisingly unpleasant chord.

Now there's Cheaper by the Dozen, a stale take on Walter Lang's 1950s farce of the same name that is based on the real-life story of Frank and Lillian Gilbreth, the parents of 12 children. Here the original Gilbreth becomes Thomas Baker (Martin). Get it? A Baker's dozen? No, the jokes don't get much better than that one, unless you laugh when an athletic supporter lands in a pot of spaghetti sauce and Martin bellows, "Pasta de la crotch!"

Continue reading: Cheaper By The Dozen Review

Gremlins Review


Good
Funny how we remember old movies as being better than they really are. I first saw Gremlins as a little kid, and I loved the film so much that my parents got me a Gizmo doll for Christmas that year. In fact, even though they don't make Gizmo toys anymore, Gremlins will still please kids today with its juvenile story involving vicious little monsters wreaking havoc on adults.

However, watching the movie recently I found flaws I didn't notice before. While I used to hide under blankets when the evil gremlins appeared, I now laugh at the shallow, one-dimensional characters, the idiotic, repetitive storyline, and especially the corny special effects.

Continue reading: Gremlins Review

Nine Months Review


Good
Nine Months has all the makings of an incredible disaster. First, its star (Hugh Grant) is arrested for lewd conduct. Second, it's a remake of a French film (Neuf Mois), always a huge negative. Finally, it's a comedy decidedly for adults which is directed by the infantile Chris Columbus, the man who brought us the Home Alone franchise and Mrs. Doubtfire.

Imagine my shock; Nine Months is pretty good.

Continue reading: Nine Months Review

Christmas With The Kranks Review


Bad
Like the honey-glazed ham around which so much of its story sadly revolves, Christmas with the Kranks is tasty at first but soon congeals into little more than a fatty, gelatinous mess. Based on one of John Grisham's bestsellers that isn't about lawyers, Skipping Christmas, the film features the fine directing talents of Joe Roth (America's Sweethearts) and a script by Chris Columbus, who apparently, now that he's done with the Harry Potter series, can go back to cranking out family-friendly pabulum.

The promising premise has Luther and Nora Krank, a couple of parents who have just sent their daughter Blair off to the Peace Corps in Peru, faced with a holiday season alone in their suburban Chicago home. Not exactly relishing the prospect of once again throwing the big Christmas Eve party, and basically just fed up with the whole guilt-induced consumer frenzy, Luther (Tim Allen) convinces Nora (Jamie Lee Curtis) to chuck the whole thing and spend 10 days on a Caribbean cruise instead. He also boycotts everything to do with the holiday, not buying or receiving any presents and taking no part in the neighborhood gatherings and decorations. Nora goes along reluctantly until the neighbors notice what's happening and turn on the Kranks in a campaign of condemnation and isolation that seems like something out of The Lottery. That is, before a convenient plot wrinkle ensures everyone will have to pull together and enjoy some holiday spirit.

Continue reading: Christmas With The Kranks Review

The Cutting Edge: The Magic Of Movie Editing Review


Very Good
While "magic" may be a little strong, The Cutting Edge: The Magic of Movie Editing is a surprisingly interesting film. If you're a filmmaker or an aspiring critic, it may well be essential viewing.

This documentary is precisely what it's title purports to be, an in-depth and instructive look at movie editing that literally spans 100 years of film history, from The Great Train Robbery to Cold Mountain. Through interviews with a copious number of directors and editors, The Cutting Edge covers everything from basic editing techniques like the matching of cuts to modern editing theory as inspired by MTV and The Matrix. The film goes into extreme detail in parts, like when we get to see James Cameron's trick of removing one frame per second out of Terminator 2 to give it more momentum and realism. It's all a little bit insidery and self-congratulatory, but the movie works far more often than not. Any film buff will find it hard not to like.

Continue reading: The Cutting Edge: The Magic Of Movie Editing Review

The Goonies Review


Very Good
The Goonies has convinced me that sterility might not be such a bad thing.

The Goonies stars Sean Astin and Corey Feldman in their formative years, as leaders of a ratty group of kids who live in the boondocks. When wealthy developers threaten to move in, they discover an old treasure map, and set off in search of "the rich stuff" to save their admittedly pathetic way of life.

Continue reading: The Goonies Review

Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban Review


OK

Well folks, it's another year at Hogwarts Academy (two years in real life), and our rapidly maturing stars are back for another round of magical high jinks and mass merchandising in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.

Harry's been absent since the fall of 2002, and even casual viewers will notice that a lot has changed over the last two years. Director Chris Columbus (who did the first two films) is out, replaced with the controversial Alfonso Cuarón, who last hit the scene with the teen sex romp Y Tu Mamá También.

You'll notice Cuarón's touch right away. He likes to pick up the camera and get right in his actor's faces, moving all the while, a stark contrast to Columbus's traditionalism. Gone as well are the rich Technicolor tones of the Columbus movies; Cuarón prefers washed-out, yellowish shading that connotes decay and decrepitude. This is old-school wizardry, not kids stuff. In one fell swoop, Cuarón has reinvented the movies into an arthouse series that's as un-kid friendly as it gets.

How you feel about all of that depends on whether you're old enough to vote. I can't speak for the kids, but I heard more than one crying jag erupt during Azkaban's 150-minute running time. Will young kids relate to this iteration of Potter? Here's the story, you be the judge:

Once again, Harry's living with his cruel aunt and uncle, anxious to return to school. That happens soon enough, and quickly he discovers he's the target of the titular Prisoner of Azkaban, a wizard named Sirius Black who was convicted for killing dozens of people, most notably Harry's parents. Now he's escaped and is making his way toward Hogwarts, ready to snuff young Potter. Harry (Daniel Radcliffe), now a troubled 13-year-old, doesn't seem overly fazed at first. He's up to his usual school antics; taking classes, sneaking out to go to town, dodging Draco. It isn't until Black arrives on the scene for real (well past the midpoint of the movie) that any of this starts to gel into a plot.

And I use that term loosely. I think of myself as an astute follower of stories, but Azkaban can be baffling if you haven't read the book or don't have someone nearby to explain who's who. For those going into this blind, there are soul-sucking dementors (not especially terrifying here), shapeshifting wizards, old friends reunited, and a time travel subplot all coming together into one of the least satisfying dénouements in fantasy movie history. While it's riddled with plot holes (which I won't reveal since they'd spoil the ending), there's no doubt Harry's going to come out of it okay: The last half hour of the movie is rehashed from another angle as we run through the time travel bit, reliving the scenes from another angle.

Azkaban the novel gets mixed reviews from Potter maniacs -- some say it's their favorite book; others say it's the worst. However, if my research is correct, it is the worst-selling of the five books to date, and it will probably go down in history as the worst of the movies, too. (But I've been wrong before, of course.) In any case, by all accounts, the books really get good starting at #4 (due out in movie form next year), while Azkaban is a slim volume where comparably little happens. Ultimately Harry is in virtually no peril compared to that in the first two stories and those that follow. Heck, Voldemort doesn't even show up in this round.

The other notable problem is how radically older the cast has gotten since 2002's Chamber of Secrets. Radcliffe is valiantly fighting off puberty, but Emma Watson (Hermione) is looking her age; she's tarted up in jeans and a rainbow belt for most of the film, and sports a more stylish haircut to boot. Now 15, Rupert Grint (Ron) looks like he ought to be starring in the next American Pie movie as a wacky foreign exchange student. And Tom Felton, who plays Draco, is now 17 years old and ought to be playing rugby in college. He probably is. I couldn't believe it was the same actor.

Speaking of actors, Richard Harris is sorely missed as Dumbledore. I love Michael Gambon, but he doesn't do the kindly old wizard too well. He's got a Robert Mitchum-esque undercoating of villainy that he just can't shake. David Thewlis and Gary Oldman are fine as the new blood, but it's Emma Thompson that steals the show as a doddering divination professor.

The rest of the series remains intact. Twittering ghosts and pictures are as we remember them (Dawn French steals a scene as a portrait of a vain fat lady), the Quidditch match is an abbreviated bust, and Snape (Alan Rickman) is as menacing as ever. But nothing much happens - certainly nothing to enhance any of the characters aside from the tenuous hand-holding of Ron and Hermione - and Azkaban generates very little energy along the way.

I have high hopes that Mike Newell will reinvigorate the series with next year's Goblet of Fire (how it will clock in at less than 8 hours I have no idea), but I can't recommend Azkaban for anyone but die-hard Potter heads.

The DVD is just the thing for those Potterphiles, including two discs of extras, such as bonus footage, cast interviews, and games for the kids.

Wand by Hogwarts. Jeans by Guess.

Chris Columbus

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Chris Columbus

Date of birth

10th September, 1958

Occupation

Filmmaker

Sex

Male


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Chris Columbus Movies

Patti Cake$ Movie Review

Patti Cake$ Movie Review

Seemingly from out of nowhere, this film generates perhaps the biggest smile of any movie...

Pixels Chris Columbus - Featurette Trailer

Pixels Chris Columbus - Featurette Trailer

Ahead of the release of comedy adventure 'Pixels' later this summer, the cast of the...

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Pixels - Extended Trailer

Pixels - Extended Trailer

Back in the eighties, NASA sent a time capsule up into space to connect with...

Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb Movie Review

Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb Movie Review

Now in its third instalment, it's clearer than ever that this franchise is based on...

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Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters Movie Review

Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters Movie Review

There can't have been a very big demand for a sequel to 2010's The Lightning...

The Help Movie Review

The Help Movie Review

A strongly issue-based story gives a terrific cast plenty to play with in this hugely...

Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief Trailer

Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief Trailer

Watch the trailer for Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief Percy Jackson isn't...

I Love You, Beth Cooper Trailer

I Love You, Beth Cooper Trailer

Watch the trailer for I Love You, Beth CooperDenis Cooverman is the valedictorian in his...

Fantastic Four: Rise Of The Silver Surfer Movie Review

Fantastic Four: Rise Of The Silver Surfer Movie Review

The NBA hands out a Most Improved Player Award at the end of each season....

Night at the Museum Movie Review

Night at the Museum Movie Review

Right around the time a monkey urinates on Ben Stiller's head, I came to terms...

Rent - Trailer Trailer

Rent - Trailer Trailer

Jonathan Larson's Pulitzer Prize-winning revolutionary rock opera Rent tells the story of a group of...

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