Chiara Mastroianni

Chiara Mastroianni

Chiara Mastroianni Quick Links

Pictures Video Film RSS

Chiara Mastroianni - The cast and crew of French drama '3 Coeurs' and other stars hit the red carpet for the movie's premiere at the 71st Venice International Film Festival - Venice, Italy - Saturday 30th August 2014

Chiara Mastroianni
Chiara Mastroianni
Chiara Mastroianni

Chiara Mastroianni - 71st Venice International Film Festival - '3 Coeurs' - Photocall - Venice, Italy - Saturday 30th August 2014

Chiara Mastroianni
Chiara Mastroianni
Chiara Mastroianni

Chiara Mastroianni - 67th Cannes Film Festival - Grace of Monaco - Premiere - Cannes, Cote d'Azur, France - Wednesday 14th May 2014

Chiara Mastroianni
Chiara Mastroianni
Chiara Mastroianni
Chiara Mastroianni

Chiara Mastroianni - The 67th Annual Cannes Film Festival - Opening Ceremony & 'Grace Of Monaco' Premiere - Cannes, France - Wednesday 14th May 2014

Chiara Mastroianni
Chiara Mastroianni

Chiara Mastroianni and Vincent Lindon - 66th Cannes Film Festival - 'Les Salauds' - Photocall - Cannes, France - Wednesday 22nd May 2013

Chiara Mastroianni and Vincent Lindon
Vincent Lindon and Chiara Mastroianni
Chiara Mastroianni, Vincent Lindon and Claire Denis
Chiara Mastroianni, Claire Denis and Vincent Lindon
Chiara Mastroianni
Chiara Mastroianni

Beloved Review


OK
Adventurous French filmmaker Honore returns to the musical genre, but this film isn't as buoyant as the wonderful Les Chansons d'Amour (2007). No, this one is dark and rather grim. And it feels about an hour too long.

In 1964 Riems, Madeleine (Sagnier) accidentally begins moonlighting as a prostitute before falling in love with a client, the charming Czech doctor Jaromil (Bukvic). He whisks her off to Prague, until the Russian invasion of 1968 and Jaromil's infidelity drive her back to France with daughter Vera.

Madeleine remarries, but never loses her feelings for Jaromil. Even some 40 years later (now played by Deneuve and Forman), they're meeting in secret, while Vera (now Mastroianni) is struggling with the fact that she has fallen in love with the wrong man (Schneider).

Continue reading: Beloved Review

A Christmas Tale Review


Extraordinary
French director Arnaud Desplechin returns to the U.S. three years after his last domestically distributed picture, Kings & Queen, bearing a gift of another sort in A Christmas Tale. Seeing release approximately a month before the titular holiday, like some Black Friday extravaganza, Desplechin packs all manner of cinematic devices, narrative theatrics, and filmic vernacular into this work of unimaginable generosity.

Only a few days before the sugar plums and wassail are set on the table, Junon Vuillard (Catherine Deneuve), the grand matriarch of a family of lunatics, is diagnosed with a serious case of lymphoma, the same disease that already claimed her eldest son Joseph. The film opens with her husband Abel (Jean-Paul Roussillon) mourning over his son with a startlingly breezy candor. Employing shadow puppets, the lineage of the Vuillard family in its current incarnation is explained, leading to Ivan (Melvil Poupad), the youngest of Junon's children.

Continue reading: A Christmas Tale Review

Persepolis Review


Essential
What does one do, or even say, about a film that is, by any measurement that matters, perfect? When considering Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi and Vincent Paronnaud's finely etched animated adaptation of Satrapi's two-part autobiographical graphic novel about growing up in Tehran during the revolution and the Iran-Iraq War, the problem (if one could call it that) becomes particularly acute. By compressing into this film the myriad of themes that it handles, from religious oppression to teenage rebellion to cultural dissonance and war, the filmmakers could have easily encumbered it with a weight that would have outweighed its many sharp delights. But by some strange and fortunate circumstance born out of vision, patience, luck, and sheer unmitigated talent, they have managed to incorporate each of those weighty topics into a work of art that's light as a feather, in the manner of the true masterpiece.

In adapting Satrapi's book for the screen, the filmmakers could easily have gone the route that Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller did with Miller's Sin City, after all, her emotive but simple black drawings would be many times easier to represent in film than, say, the luridly complex and many-colored works of many other graphic artists. But instead of simply replicating what was on the printed page, Satrapi and Paronnaud went to a much more expressive place, choosing instead to keep the spirit and basic look of those dark, simple pages of art, and just add a natural fluidity to it. The frame doesn't move much, leaving one with the impression of looking through a window into another world, where the characters practically float like dancers amid the layered fields of beautifully grey-shaded art, and the mood is grim and poetic. There is little background music or noise except when necessary, eschewing the clouding clutter of a Disney production, with the bright and clear vocals of an early Peanuts film -- and all the heartache-inducing simple truths which that implies.

Continue reading: Persepolis Review

It's Easier For A Camel... Review


Weak
To paraphrase Bogart, the problems of a bunch of rich people don't add up to a hill of beans in this crazy world - this is why your average filmmaker, in order to get an audience to care about disgustingly wealthy characters is to either make them so engaging that one can't help but get emotionally involved or to subject them to truly horrific circumstances that level the economic playing field. It's Easier for a Camel..., an autobiographical story by the actress Valeria Bruni Tedeschi - who wrote, directed and stars in the film - about an Italian family of malcontents living in Paris off their patriarch's vast earnings, does neither of these things, resulting in a distant and distinctly minor piece of work.

Tedeschi plays Federica, a young Italian woman who's trying to make a go of things as a playwright but seems to spend most of her time mooning about in discontent, daydreaming, finding ways to sabotage her relationships, and compulsively going to confession, even though she has nothing to confess. As her working-class, leftist boyfriend Pierre (Jean-Hughes Anglade) reminds her, with the vast sums of money sitting in her bank account, her intermittent writing is actually less a job than a hobby. The film's title is a reference to the Biblical passage about it being easier for a camel to fit through the eye of a needle than for a rich person to enter heaven.

Continue reading: It's Easier For A Camel... Review

Carnage Review


OK
Here's the Euro version on the ever-popular "interlocking tales" genre.

Why is it so popular? Because it's so easy. All you have to do is start with one character, then keep inventing friends and relatives until you connect them back to the first guy. This is exactly what writer/director Delphine Gleize has done. Unfortunately, she forgot that to add in anything along the way that we should actually care about.

Continue reading: Carnage Review

Searching For Debra Winger Review


Good
It's either sad or interesting or -- something -- when the only man in a movie is Roger Ebert. Rosanna Arquette, tired of hearing that old aphorism that there are no good parts for women in Hollywood, takes up a video camera and records interviews with some three dozen actresses at various ages. (The title invokes Debra Winger's recent retirement and reclusiveness -- though since this film she returned to the cinema.)

Continue reading: Searching For Debra Winger Review

Ready To Wear Review


Weak
Ready to Wear, a supposed send-up of the fashion world, is a big disappointment, this time from Robert Altman. I got the feeling that Altman didn't really have any idea what he wanted to say with this film (which he later conceded in a TV interview). Altman has to resort to slapstick and dog excrement to make the audience laugh, despite about a zillion big-name stars. Occasionally, people manage to shine despite the cheesy story, making it mildly entertaining.

Continue reading: Ready To Wear Review

Time Regained Review


Bad

For the sake of perspective, this review should begin with a confession: Your critic knows little of Proust. I haven't read any Proust. Most quotes I've heard from the deeply philosophical writer have come from the mouths of people so full of themselves that the words went in one ear and out the other out of disdain for the speaker. I admit it, I'm an ignoramus on this front.

So as you come to realize that I didn't much care for "Time Regained," the French film adaptation of Marcel Proust's last novel, feel free to draw the conclusion that I haven't the slightest idea what I'm talking about.

What little I do know of Proust, however, leads me to believe if the man were alive today he would scoff at the idea that the deliberate formlessness of "Time" could successfully be adapted to film.

Continue reading: Time Regained Review

Chiara Mastroianni

Chiara Mastroianni Quick Links

Pictures Video Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Suggested

Relive Kate Bush's 2014 Live Show With 'Before The Dawn'

Relive Kate Bush's 2014 Live Show With 'Before The Dawn'

The live album is set for released in November.

Benedict Cumberbatch Joins David Gilmour Onstage For 'Comfortably Numb'

Benedict Cumberbatch Joins David Gilmour Onstage For 'Comfortably Numb'

The 'Sherlock' and 'Doctor Strange' star joined Gilmour onstage at the Royal Albert Hall for a rendition of the Pink Floyd classic.

Advertisement
Chapter Three Of 'American Horror Story: Roanoke' Explains The Story Behind The Haunting (Spoilers)

Chapter Three Of 'American Horror Story: Roanoke' Explains The Story Behind The Haunting (Spoilers)

Time to learn what Kathy Bates' character has to do with all of this.

Advertisement

Chiara Mastroianni Movies

Beloved Movie Review

Beloved Movie Review

Adventurous French filmmaker Honore returns to the musical genre, but this film isn't as buoyant...

A Christmas Tale Movie Review

A Christmas Tale Movie Review

French director Arnaud Desplechin returns to the U.S. three years after his last domestically distributed...

Persepolis Trailer

Persepolis Trailer

PersepolisTrailerPersepolis is the moving story of a young girl coming-of-age in Iran during the Islamic...

Advertisement
It's Easier for a Camel... Movie Review

It's Easier for a Camel... Movie Review

To paraphrase Bogart, the problems of a bunch of rich people don't add up to...

Time Regained Movie Review

Time Regained Movie Review

For the sake of perspective, this review should begin with a confession: Your critic knows...

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.