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The Assassin Trailer


The Assassin directed by Hou Hsiao- Hsien is a deeply transporting film that follows the journey of Nie Yinniang who has been trained to kill. When she was younger her family betrayed her and as a result she has been raised by a nun. The film which is set in seventh century China is a piece of beautiful cinema that uses techniques to show the astonishing views that the country has to offer which has a pro founding effect on you.

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HAIG CLUB(TM) Single Grain Scotch Whisky Private Event

Scottie Pippen, David Beckham, Chang Chen , Larsa Pippen - The event series which began in the heart of London last March at the Wellington Arch will move to Shanghai in 2016. - Miami, Florida, United States - Tuesday 15th September 2015

Scottie Pippen, David Beckham, Chang Chen and Larsa Pippen

The Grandmaster Review


Good

Leave it to Hong Kong maestro Wong Kar Wai (In the Mood for Love) to reinvent both the historical biopic and Chinese kung fu action movie in one fell swoop. This is a staggeringly beautiful movie, designed and shot with precision and sensitivity to show both the action and the drama in telling detail. The story of one of the most iconic martial artists in Chinese history, the film is lush and involving even as it's also somewhat overly complicated and hard to engage with.

It starts in 1936, when northern master Gong (Wang Qingxiang) travels to the south to investigate reports about Ip Man (Tony Leung Chiu Wai), who just might be the future of kung fu. Intrigued, he offers Ip the chance to become the grandmaster. But Gong's daughter Er (Zhang Ziyi) feels like this is an insult to her family. Then in 1938 Japan invades, and Ip refuses to collaborate with the enemy, which separates him from his wife (Song Hye-kyo) and children. Although Gong's heir Ma San (Zhang Jin) does make a deal with the Japanese, which strongly offends Er's intensely held code of honour. More than a decade later Ip tracks down Er again in Hong Kong; she's working as a doctor while Ip is teaching martial arts. His newest student is the young Bruce Lee.

This story is told through a series of epic hand-to-hand battles, each of which is choreographed in a specific style suitable to the combatants. These details may not be clear to unschooled audience members, but the way Wong shoots and edits the scenes is seriously striking. With lush photography by Oscar-nominated Philippe Le Sourd, the fight scenes have astounding detail, often slow-motion close-ups that make each encounter refreshingly lucid. They're also never overwrought, designed to show the skill of the fighters rather than the usual blood and death. And while Leung gives the film a strikingly cool centre, it's Zhang Ziyi who breathes real passion into the story, lighting up the screen even when she's standing silent and still

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The Grandmaster Trailer


Ip Man is a legend in the field of martial arts, best known for teaching Chinese actor and fight Bruce Lee. Born into a prosperous family in Foshan, Southern China, his enthusiasm for his art leads him to the well-known brothel, the Gold Pavilion, which becomes the spot where Gong Baosen renounces his title as Grandmaster in Northern China. Ip is challenged to a fight in order to usurp the Grandmaster title, though against Gong's daughter Gong Er, who is worthy to take up the title? Between the continued threats of Japanese occupation of China, Gong Baosen finds himself amidst a brutal betrayal leading Gong Er on a mission of vengeance. As both Ip's and Gong's personal toils wear on, their futures become uncertain - Ip's only goal is to become China's greatest grandmaster and to teach his disciples the magnificence of his life's passion.

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The Grandmaster Trailer


Ip Man was a martial arts legend famous for tutoring the actor and Jeet Kune Do founder Bruce Lee. This movie tells the story of how Northern China's best martial artist Gong Yutian renounces his grandmaster title and challenges Ip (who was picked as the representative of Southern China) to a fight. However, following his dignified win, Gong's daughter Gong Err seeks to restore her family's honour with another challenge. Later, though, their lives are interrupted by the Second Sino-Japanese War and Ip's family is thrust into poverty while Gong Err is forced on a mission of vengeance when her father is brutally killed. Both must choose a new path for themselves to follow - though Ip struggles to make much of a life for himself; standing out against the other fighting talent of Hong Kong proves to be difficult and he must use all his ability to become a great Grandmaster.

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Blood Brothers Review


OK
John Woo turns up as a producer of Blood Brothers, and it's not too surprising since the film is a reimagining of an earlier Woo effort, Bullet in the Head, which has a similar setup and plot points. Both films track the adventures of three friends from the boonies who seek to make it in the big and dangerous outside world but get much more excitement than they bargained for.

While Bullet in the Head is set in Vietnam during the war, Blood Brothers takes us back to the glamorous nightclubs of Shanghai in the '30s. Feng (Daniel Wu), Kang (Liu Ye), and Kang's brother Hu (Tony Yang) decide to leave their poor village and venture into town to see what they can make of themselves. It's rough going at first, with the guys taking on menial and humiliating jobs such as rickshaw pulling, but Hu lucks out by landing work as a waiter at the gorgeous Paradise Club, where all of haute Shanghai comes to party and to pay homage to the crime bosses who run it. The star of the show: Lulu (Shi Qi), who's the plaything of the big boss but is secretly in love with Mark (Chang Chen), one of his bodyguards.

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Silk Review


OK
No matter how many Asian ghost stories I watch -- and I've watched a lot -- I can never get a handle on what it is exactly that Asian ghosts want. Some are sad, some are lonely, some have unfinished business, some are stuck between worlds, and some want bloody revenge.

While the Taiwanese thriller Silk doesn't come close to providing a definitive answer about ghosts' motivations, it does take the question very seriously and even suggests that ghosts have a kind of enviable existence, in part because "they don't have to look for parking spaces anymore."

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Photocall To Promote The Movie 'Red Cliff' At W Hotel

Chang Chen, Tony Leung, John Woo, Kaneshiro Takeshi and Lin Chi-ling - Chang Chen, Tony Leung, John Woo, Kaneshiro Takeshi and Lin Chi-Ling Seoul, South Korea - Photocall to promote the movie 'Red Cliff' at W Hotel Wednesday 25th June 2008

Chang Chen, Tony Leung, John Woo, Kaneshiro Takeshi and Lin Chi-ling
Chang Chen, Tony Leung, John Woo, Kaneshiro Takeshi and Lin Chi-ling
Chang Chen

Three Times Review


Extraordinary
Isn't it funny how people remember things? Rashomon aside, the way the human brain remembers things is absolutely astonishing. Taiwanese mainstay Hou Hsiao-hsien says he thought up the first section of his latest masterpiece, Three Times, after having a dream of being a young adult in a pool hall with the Platters' classic "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes." Like his leading Asian rival Wong Kar-wai and American heavyweight Martin Scorcese, Hsiao-hsien's use of music and imagery punctuates his stories with vivid evocation, using the same two actors to breathe deep emotions into three separate time periods.

The first section, titled "A Time for Love," concerns Chen (Chang Chen), a soldier who silently plays pool on leave and writes love letters to pool-hall girls while he is away. When he returns from leave, he finds that the last girl has been replaced by May (Shu Qi), a breathtaking woman in a flower dress. They say very few words, but he promises to write her while away. When he returns and she has been replaced, he searches through several small towns just to spend one night next to her.

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Eros Review


Grim
A triptych of short films, all on the subject of eroticism, sounds tantalizing, so it's too bad none of the shorts contained in Eros actually hits its mark. This despite the fact they were separately made by three of the most renowned directors of the past 40 years: Wong Kar Wai, Steven Soderbergh and Michelangelo Antonioni. What they manage in their individual shorts in Eros are but minor variations on themes and aesthetics already well explored in their own full-length films.

Wong Kar Wai's bluntly titled "The Hand" and set in his recurring milieu of early '60s Hong Kong, follows Zhang (Chang Chen), a humble tailor's apprentice, over his years-long infatuation with a beautiful socialite-turned-prostitute, Miss Hua (Gong Li). Kar Wai's treatment is aesthetically fussy, in keeping with his well-known style, but dramatically bland. There simply isn't much at stake here as the timorous Zhang must be content with the, ahem, hand jobs (see title) he receives all too rarely from the object of his infatuation. Now, hand job scenes (even in non-porno cinema) can be extremely erotic because of what they offer and what they only tease at (for a convincer, see the relevant scene in Michael Heneke's otherwise awful The Piano Teacher. Wow!). In any case, the segment's manually operated pseudo-erotica provide the only spike in an otherwise indolent story that never substantially conveys its central concern: Zhang's steady sexual awakening and his unshakeable devotion to an unavailable woman. Still, Kar Wai's fabulously crafted sound and imagery are both par for the course for this director and his world-class cinematographer, Christopher Doyle.

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Happy Together Review


Grim
Wong Kar Wai is up to his old tricks -- using various film stocks and camera speeds, using in-and-out-of-focus shots, mixing color and black-and-white -- only this time he's not enhancing the grittiness of his tale, he's hiding its defects. Happy Together is at first an interesting look at an extremely dysfunctional relationship between two Hong Kong men now living in Argentina (no idea what inspired that one...), but its histrionics eventually grow wearisome. The study of contrasting lives and lifestyles is hardly unique save for its inexplicably original setting. Terribly conceited and almost unbearably padded.

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Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon Review


Good

A magnificently crafted hybrid of Chinese historical epic, F/X-enhanced martial arts spectacular, mystical romantic tragedy and live-action anime, "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" is a film that defies genre while embracing traditionalism.

It's an intellectually challenging story of noble warriors in feudal China, yet it's packed with eloquent swordplay and lightning-fast hand-to-hand combat. It's also the story of a burning, long-unspoken love between one warrior and the fiancée of a fallen comrade -- a woman his honor forbids him from pursuing, even years later as they fight side-by-side against a mysterious and vengeful sworn enemy.

What's more, it is an unconventional coming-of-age fable as well, about the beautiful teenage daughter (Zhang Ziyi) of a provincial governor, who longs desperately for freedom in the face of an impending arranged marriage that will surely clip her wings.

Continue reading: Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon Review

Chen Chang

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Chen Chang Movies

The Assassin Trailer

The Assassin Trailer

The Assassin directed by Hou Hsiao- Hsien is a deeply transporting film that follows the...

The Grandmaster Movie Review

The Grandmaster Movie Review

Leave it to Hong Kong maestro Wong Kar Wai (In the Mood for Love) to...

The Grandmaster Trailer

The Grandmaster Trailer

Ip Man is a legend in the field of martial arts, best known for teaching...

The Grandmaster Trailer

The Grandmaster Trailer

Ip Man was a martial arts legend famous for tutoring the actor and Jeet Kune...

Blood Brothers Movie Review

Blood Brothers Movie Review

John Woo turns up as a producer of Blood Brothers, and it's not too surprising...

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Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon Movie Review

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon Movie Review

If you thought the only real place for gravity-defying fight scenes was The Matrix, think...

Eros Movie Review

Eros Movie Review

Three world filmmakers team up for this anthology exploringthe ways in which people connect sexually....

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon Movie Review

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon Movie Review

A magnificently crafted hybrid of Chinese historical epic, F/X-enhanced martial arts spectacular, mystical romantic tragedy...

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