Cheech Marin

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Melanoma Research Foundation's Celebrity Golf Tournament

Cheech Marin - Photo's from a celebrity golf tournament which was held at the Lakeside Golf Club in Burbank to raise money for the Melanoma Research Foundation's in Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 10th November 201

Cheech Marin

Spike TV's 'Guys Choice' 2014

Cheech Marin and Natasha Marin - Spike TV's 'Guys Choice' 2014 at Sony Pictures Studios - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 7th June 2014

Cheech Marin and Natasha Marin
Cheech Marin and Natasha Marin

Doris Bergman 6th Annual Oscar gifting suite

Cheech Marin - Doris Bergman 6th Annual Oscar gifting suite event held at Fig and Olive - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 14th February 2014

Cheech Marin

Cheech & Chong perform at Hard Rock Live

Tommy Chong, Shelby Chong and Cheech Marin - Cheech & Chong perform at Hard Rock Live inside the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino - Hollywood, Florida, United States - Sunday 15th December 2013

Tommy Chong, Shelby Chong and Cheech Marin
Cheech Marin and Tommy Chong
Cheech Marin and Tommy Chong
Tommy Chong, Shelby Chong and Cheech Marin
Cheech Marin and Tommy Chong

The 6th Annual George Lopez Celebrity Golf Classic To Benefit The Lopez Foundation

Cheech Marin - The 6th Annual George Lopez Celebrity Golf Classic To Benefit The Lopez Foundation - Toluca Lake, California, United States - Tuesday 7th May 2013

Cheech Marin
Cheech Marin

Machete Review


Good
Essentially part three of the Grindhouse series, this old-style thriller sprang from Rodriguez's fake trailer. In some ways it should have stayed that short, because while it's riotously entertaining, there's nothing much to it.

Machete (Trejo) is a disgraced Mexican Federale who's hiding amongst the illegal immigrants on the Texas-Mexico border. Here he stumbles into a conspiracy involving a trigger-happy senator (DeNiro) and a wild-eyed vigilante (Johnson) who are cleaning up the border one bullet at a time. But he also runs up against a sexy immigration officer (Alba), a ruthless businessman (Fahey) and a trail of criminality leading to his nemesis Torrez (Seagal). As things get nasty, he gets help from his priest brother (Marin) and a feisty taco-truck lady (Rodriguez).

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Beverly Hills Chihuahua Review


Grim
Of all the misguided movie genres, the modern family film is the most disingenuous. While it argues that it's merely providing "quality" entertainment to those underserved by Hollywood's obsession with sex and violence, the truth is that most G- to PG-rated fare is far more insidious. Applying a sugar-coated Saturday morning superficiality to what's supposed to pass for pleasantries, the Tinsel Town machine still finds a way to manufacture out all the fun. Disney's disappointing live action comedy Beverly Hills Chihuahua can be accused of a great many faults -- indirect racism, single digit IQ writing, past-tense pop culture awareness -- but one thing it cannot claim is an ability to reach beyond its typical tween demographic.

Chloe (the voice of Drew Barrymore) is the most pampered pooch in all of sunny LaLa Land. Her owner (Jamie Lee Curtis) is a rich cosmetics titan who indulges her pet's every non-human whim. When the mogul needs to fly off to Europe to launch her new line, she must rely on her prissy, high strung niece Rachel (Piper Perabo) to mind her valuable canine. Showing just how responsible she is, our substitute sitter instantly accepts an invitation to weekend in Mexico, and takes Chloe along for the unnecessary ride. Dognappers eventually hijack the hound, and it's up to an ex-cop German Shepherd (voiced by Andy Garcia), a good natured landscaper (Manolo Cardona), and his frisky Chihuahua Papi (voiced by George Lopez) to rescue the four footed female before it's too late.

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Oliver & Company Review


Weak
Disney's animated version of Dickens' Oliver Twist, Oliver & Company, is a true oddity in the Disney canon. For starters, the animation style is completely different from anything else in its repertoire. Obviously inspired by Ralph Bakshi (of Felix the Cat fame), the movie features garish perspectives, serious abuse of zoom (in almost every scene), and an attempt at urban grittiness which Walt Disney never knew in his entire life.

And yet here it is, Oliver & Company, wherein an orphaned kitten falls in with a crowd of dogs-cum-hustlers, only to end up adopted into a rich girl's house. A kidnappng and rescue plot (pushing the boundaries of the G rating) ensues -- ironically, it's the best part of the movie.

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Yellowbeard Review


Weak
Long missing on DVD, Yellowbeard is that strangest of combinations: A Cheech and Chong movie melded with a Monty Python movie.

And not in a very good way.

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Spy Kids Review


Excellent
There are few respectable filmmakers in the world that would take on the difficult challenge of creating a children's movie. I don't mean those hack directors who just sit behind the camera and yell "action" and "print," but those few who take on the challenge of writing, directing, producing, and even editing a successful film for the underage masses. Creating a fantasy world with non-abrasive violence, imaginative sets and props, and engaging characters to follow is a tough process. With Spy Kids, Robert Rodriguez proves that his handling of adult fare extends to kids' stuff, too.

My favorite films are from my childhood -- Flash Gordon, Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, Mary Poppins, the Muppets movies, Pee-Wee's Big Adventure, and The Never-Ending Story -- and they all presented an impossible world made real only by the power of imagination. Spy Kids ranks up there with the best children's films by creating implausible scenarios made from martial arts stunts, gee-whiz spy gadgets, robots built entirely of huge thumbs, a holodeck-like room filled with rolling clouds and stretches of golden sands, and providing total escapism for both kids and adults.

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Up in Smoke Review


Weak
Cinema's most notorious stoners star in their first, most notorious screen roles. Up in Smoke is the world's most revered -- and most idiotic -- drug movie, a road trip in search of the ultimate high, with Johnny Law on our heroes' tail all the way. Meanwhile, it's non-stop sex, drugs, rock & roll, and drugs. Did I mention drugs? Cheech Marin and Tommy Chong managed to milk this shtick for eight years before they sobered up... with varying degrees of success.

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Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over Review


Good
Companies have created a number of brain-numbing devices to milk the susceptible wallets of adolescents in recent years. From Playstation to GameCube to Xbox, it seems as if the companies are always releasing new video game systems, only pausing to develop new and improved systems. It's a wonder they haven't come up with a device that allows the gamers to enter the video game itself.

Now they have -- except the gamers will have to drop their controllers for a few hours to catch Spy Kids 3-D in order to experience it. This is the movie video gamers have been waiting for, designed specifically for short-attention spans -- it's loaded with stimulating effects, nonstop action sequences, and, best yet, a journey inside a very cool video game in 3-D! It goes without saying that Spy Kids 3-D might be the only movie this summer with enough charisma to get your kids to leave their consoles -- so take advantage of it.

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After Hours Review


Extraordinary
It's one of cinema's greatest freak-outs. The mild-mannered and terminably hapless Paul (Griffin Dunne, in the defining role of his career) encounters Marcy (Rosanna Arquette, ditto) in a coffee shop, reading Tropic of Cancer, naturally. When he gets her number and takes a cab ride to a desolate and rain-drenched SoHo to meet her at her loft, things take a turn for the bizarre -- with Paul finding himself entangled with an intertwined web of people, including an obsessive cocktail waitress (Teri Garr), a suicidal girl, a possibly murderous sculptress (Linda Fiorentino), an unhinged ice cream truck driver (Catherine O'Hara), and a whole host of other characters that represent some of the wackiest nutjobs in cinema. No one else seems to notice it's so bizarre except for Paul: As Dick Miller's diner cook character puts it, when it's after hours, "Different rules apply."

By the end, Paul is on the run from an angry mob who thinks he's a burglar, fleeing in fear for his life. Will he escape? Well, rest assured that After Hours is actually a comedy. It's also one of my favorite Martin Scorsese movies (and a massive departure from his grittier fare), fresh every time you see it and full of little touches that you catch more of with each subsequent viewing. Check out the rows of Aqua Net in Garr's apartment. Or the "tie" she's wearing.

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Picking Up the Pieces Review


Terrible
Normally, I'd say any movie that features Woody Allen as a homocidal maniac is okay in my book, if only Picking Up the Pieces didn't bore you to tears en route to the funny stuff, which consists solely of Allen's spare one-liners. The plot, involving a New Mexico community that rallies around Allen's dead wife's severed hand thanks to its miracle-granting powers, shows a ton of promise, but never delivers. Note to Alfonso Arau: more boobs.

Masked & Anonymous Review


Terrible
Masked & Anonymous, as a title, comes across as a vague, artsy moniker as inaccessible as the film it represents. But look closer at the name of this movie about revolution and despair, and you'll discover a clear reference to the film's writers; credited as Rene Fontaine and Sergei Petrov, the screenwriters have been unmasked, as it were, revealed to be the film's iconic star, Bob Dylan, and director Larry Charles (HBO's Curb Your Enthusiasm).

The result of this combination is an overly ambitious film that's as muddled and cryptic as a mumble-filled Dylan vocal. Dylan stars as the symbolically named Jack Fate, an apparent musical legend, jailed in the midst of a brutally downtrodden America where the government has taken over, war is rampant, and even the counter-revolutionaries have counter-revolutionaries.

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Cheech Marin

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