Chazz Palminteri

Chazz Palminteri

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Chazz Palminteri - Keep Memory Alive Rolls Out The Red Carpet For 20th Annual Power Of Love Gala Honoring Tony Bennett - Arrivals at MGM Grand Garden Arena - Las Vegas, Nevada, United States - Saturday 21st May 2016

Chazz Palminteri
Chazz Palminteri
Chazz Palminteri
Chazz Palminteri

Chazz Palmenteri - Keep Memory Alive's 20th Annual Power Of Love Gala held at MGM Grand Garden Arena - Arrivals - Las Vegas, Nevada, United States - Saturday 21st May 2016

Chazz Palmenteri
Chazz Palmenteri

Legend Review

Good

Written and directed with a rakish swagger, and featuring two full-on performances from Tom Hardy, this true London gangster drama is hugely entertaining, even if it feels undercooked. Aside from that generic title, the film basically has no plot at all, and it strips real-life people of their complexity. It's as if the filmmakers were afraid to challenge the audience in any way. But the edgy mix of comedy and violence is riveting.

The events recounted took place over about two years in the early 1960s, although the film's anecdotal structure makes it feel more like a decade. As it begins, the fearsome young Kray brothers (both played by Tom Hardy) are consolidating their gangland grip on East London and expanding around the city, with their next target being South London boss Charlie Richardson (Paul Bettany). Reggie Kray is the tough-minded businessman, while identical twin Ronnie is a terrifying thug who happens to be openly gay at a time when being so was illegal. As they blatantly manipulate the rule of law, a Scotland Yard inspector (Christopher Ecclestone) is desperately looking for a way to take them down. Meanwhile, Reggie is romancing the 16-year-old Frances (Emily Browning), much to the annoyance of her imperious mother (Tara Fitzgerald).

The tumultuous relationship between Reggie and Frances is the only thing that adds a sense of narrative momentum to the film. Otherwise, it's a series of set-pieces that take a darkly humorous approach to family clashes and criminal violence. Writer-director Brian Helgeland infuses even the grisliest brutality with an amusing smirk, which makes the movie much more engaging than expected. And Hardy storms through the film with real charisma in both roles, as the steely, magnetic Reggie and the more unstable, fearsome Ronnie. Both performances are scene-stealing, nicely conveying how these men managed to hold the entire city in their grip, even though they were only in their early 30s at the time.

Continue reading: Legend Review

Legend - First Look Trailer


Throughout the 1950s and 1960s, London was at the mercy of the terrifying Kray twins (Tom Hardy). Reggie Kray was forced to spend most of his life holding back his identical twin brother, Ronnie, who suffered from paranoid schizophrenia. As acclaimed night club owners and feared gangsters, the two twins were seen to own London, and lived a life of glitz and glamour, as well as blood and brutality. That is, until Detective Superintendent Leonard "Nipper" Read (Christopher Eccleston) took the task of bringing two of the most powerful and dangerous criminals in the city's history to justice, by any means necessary. 

Continue: Legend - First Look Trailer

Video - Samuel L. Jackson And Kate Bosworth Seen Outside The Museum Of The Moving Image In New York


'Avengers' star Samuel L. Jackson and 'Homefront' actress Kate Bosworth with husband Michael Polish were among the star-studded arrivals at the Museum Of The Moving Image's 28th Annual Salute in New York, which this year was honouring 'House Of Cards' actor Kevin Spacey.

Continue: Video - Samuel L. Jackson And Kate Bosworth Seen Outside The Museum Of The Moving Image In New York

Gianna Ranaudo and Chazz Palminteri - Gianna Ranaudo, Chazz Palminteri New York City, USA - The New York premiere of 'Limitless' - Inside Arrivals Tuesday 8th March 2011

Gianna Ranaudo and Chazz Palminteri

Yonkers Joe Review


Good
Making a film about a scam artist is probably a lot like being one -- no matter how solid an idea seems, it's really all about the execution. The life of a cheat lends itself to high drama and conflict, but it can also be riddled with clichés. Throw in a mentally disabled son and a shot at the big score, and you've got a combination of storylines so obvious, they seem destined to fail. But Yonkers Joe doesn't fail. It's a spunky little indie that succeeds past its cheap conventions.

Both the credit and the blame go to writer-director Robert Celestino. His cornball plot shouldn't work, but his direction, especially with actors, does. Chazz Palminteri (Celestino's executive producer) is the title guy, a gambling stiff with an amazing ability to cheat crap games. He'll belly up to a table, pull some David Blaine-like moves to drop tainted dice into a game, and make a fortune. Unfortunately, Atlantic City security has his number, and private games are too small for his ambitions.

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Chazz Palminteri Thursday 8th May 2008 The Rainforest Foundation Funds 'Some Kinda Legacy' benefit party held at the Plaza hotel New York City, USA

Chazz Palminteri
Chazz Palminteri

Chazz Palminteri - Wednesday 23rd April 2008 at Tribeca Film Festival New York City, USA

Chazz Palminteri

A Guide To Recognizing Your Saints Review


Good
Dito Montiel grew up in an ungentrified Astoria, Queens, in the '80s, running with semi-hoodlums and raising misdemeanor-sized hell. But unlike a lot of teenage thugs-in-training, Montiel escaped his neighborhood to become a writer. His book A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints, unread by me, chronicles his roughneck coming of age; now he has written and directed a film version of the same name. A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints has become Montiel's indie-flavored brand; I look forward to his self-drawn Saints comic book, or maybe a line of handcrafted rough-and-tumble action figures and Astoria playset.

Judging solely from his film, Montiel can actually write, at least as far as authentic dialogue goes. His characters hem and haw and shout at each other, profanities overlapping and cascading yet going nowhere. The scenes of young Dito (Shia LaBeouf), his family, and his friends crammed into his kitchen can be wearying, but also show an expert knowledge of the way the ruts of people's lives can create a jocular yet maddening hardheadedness.

Continue reading: A Guide To Recognizing Your Saints Review

A Guide To Recognizing Your Saints Review


Good
Dito Montiel grew up in an ungentrified Astoria, Queens, in the '80s, running with semi-hoodlums and raising misdemeanor-sized hell. But unlike a lot of teenage thugs-in-training, Montiel escaped his neighborhood to become a writer. His book A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints, unread by me, chronicles his roughneck coming of age; now he has written and directed a film version of the same name. A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints has become Montiel's indie-flavored brand; I look forward to his self-drawn Saints comic book, or maybe a line of handcrafted rough-and-tumble action figures and Astoria playset.

Judging solely from his film, Montiel can actually write, at least as far as authentic dialogue goes. His characters hem and haw and shout at each other, profanities overlapping and cascading yet going nowhere. The scenes of young Dito (Shia LaBeouf), his family, and his friends crammed into his kitchen can be wearying, but also show an expert knowledge of the way the ruts of people's lives can create a jocular yet maddening hardheadedness.

Continue reading: A Guide To Recognizing Your Saints Review

Little Man (2006) Review


Terrible
Not even White Chicks can prepare you for the badness brought on by Little Man. This "Li'l Bubba's House" is my early Razzie favorite and definitely the worst theatrical release so far this year. Its awfulness stems primarily from its central conceit, so before like a ravenous lion I tear at its vulnerable wildebeest flesh, a brief synopsis is appropriate.Calvin Sims (Marlon Wayans) is a little criminal, "little" being the operative word. At just three feet of height and with a silky smooth face, he is known in the underworld as "Baby Face" Sims. On the day of his release from prison, Calvin teams up with his partner Percy P (Tracy Morgan) to rob a jewelry store of the giant Queen Diamond. The diamond inadvertently ends up in the hands of Vanessa (Kerry Washington) and Darryl Edwards (Shawn Wayans) who unknowingly escort it to their home in the Chicago suburbs. Calvin utilizes his "little man" status to bluff his way into the Edwards household, pretending to be a baby to get himself close to the misplaced prize. Of course, hilarity ensues when the Edwardses grow attached to Calvin and start to treat him as they would their own baby boy. Bring on the rectal thermometers!Wait. Hilarity? Wrong word. Typo. Error. The more apt choice would be banality, or even creepiness. Little Man is a project misconceived on every possible level. The most prominent of these levels is also the most central: Calvin, the little man himself. The entire time I watched I could not shake the feeling that something was seriously wrong with the very idea of the movie. It isn't just that there isn't a funny moment in the thing or that every character is less than paper thin, there was something sorely wrong with the concept of attaching an adult's head to a child's body. Here we have a "man child" having sex with his supposed mother, clutching at giant fake breasts and growling every time he sees a firm buttock. It was plainly irksome. However, if that doesn't seem wrong to you, and the idea of Marlon Wayans' head on a little body is fine, certainly the shoddy execution will offend. The visual effects team have literally transposed footage of Wayans performing each scene onto the body of a child actor performing the same scenes with the cast. The result is seam-full and distracting. Laugh-free moments such as Calvin sticking his tongue down the throat of a hot blonde, played by Brittany Daniel, are made that much worse by the poor quality of the visual effects. It all lends an otherworldliness to Calvin: He is the oddest and most unsettling child, man, thing, to hit cinemas for a long time. I include recent and past Damiens in that calculation.One could forgive bad effects and cringing characterizations if the movie was at all funny. It isn't. The closest it comes to humor is a running gag about white people viewing black people as criminals. Not exactly fresh and as a running gag runs out of puff the second of about thirty times it is repeated. The entire movie is similarly stale. Director Keenen Ivory Wayans chooses locations and colors for the film that are noticeably drab. He also demonstrates an amateurish tendency to let some scenes (Calvin pooping his pants for example) outstay their welcome while cutting away from others at the most inappropriate of times. Shawn Wayans as Calvin's newfound father figure is bland, while Kerry Washington as the mother has her smile set to high beam and her performance is garishly overplayed to match.Little Man is a depressing experience that critics will rightly savage. I have no doubt however that our cries will fall on deaf ears. Orthodontic surgery would be more fun than watching this, but some will still venture, cash in hand, to the weird and wonder-less world of this latest Wayans Brothers mess. Money will be made, minds will be lessened and much to my chagrin, future Wayans green lights will be lit.Whatcha talkin' 'bout, Mini-Me?

Running Scared Review


Good
Like Paul Walker's character in it, Running Scared is a lot smarter than it looks. Unfortunately, it spends as much time being dumb as acting dumb, making for an experience that can be as frustrating as it is entertaining. The film is basically three different movies: One, a straightforward crime drama, probably its strongest suit. Two, a satire of the genre, working on many levels from Peckinpah-esque examination of the male psyche to urban Grimm fairy tale. And, sadly, three, a genuinely clunky thriller. Unfortunately, you never know which you'll get from scene to scene, or even moment to moment.Paul Walker plays Joey Gazelle (Get it? He runs. This would be the less clever part.), a family man in suburban Jersey who also happens to work for the local mob. After a deal gone wrong ends up with a lot of dead people, some of them dirty cops, Joey is charged with his usual task of disposing of the gun that killed said cops. Joey, however, has been stashing the guns he's supposed to have ditched as an "insurance policy." When his son Nicky (Alex Neuberger) and his neighbor's kid Oleg (Cameron Bright) witness him adding the weapon to his collection, Oleg sees an opportunity to settle the score with his abusive father, Anzor (Karel Roden).Soon, Anzor is wounded, Oleg is on the run, and Joey has one night to get the gun back or end up dead at the hands of his own people. Since Nicky might know where to find Oleg, what ensues is the worst Take Your Kid To Work Day ever.Writer/director Wayne Kramer (The Cooler) displays an appetite for flashy camera tricks, but we're not in Domino territory here, thank God. Unlike Tony Scott, Kramer shows some restraint and variety, but the frequent double exposures still wear thin. Just as often, though, he creates intimate spaces where his characters can interact, isolated from the surrounding chaos.The writing varies from sly satire to witless implausibility. Chazz Palminteri's character, a dirty cop, steps into more than one commercial parody in the film, making a passing reference to the actor's own Vanilla Coke ad in the process. At the same time the film relies far too much on coincidence to further the plot.The performances here are all adequate. Walker shows that he can do a convincing Jersey accent. Vera Farmiga's performance as Joey's wife is uneven, but effective when it really counts. Bright pulls off the eerie thousand-yard stare of a kid who's seen too much at home, and so is unfazed by the monsters he encounters in the real world.The deliberate nature of some of Kramer's choices suggest something bubbling under the surface. He sets a key action scene in a hockey rink, a place of socially acceptable violence. Anzor has a tattoo of John Wayne on his back, and carries an obsession with the actor that might serve as a commentary on film violence. References to ultra-violent films like Scarface surface from time to time. It's clear that Kramer's trying to say something, but what?Unlike Revolver, which pretentiously aspires to levels it never achieves, Running Scared aspires to levels it occasionally achieves without ever taking itself too seriously, and while being massively entertaining even when it's not making a whole lot of sense. Kramer's sophomore effort shows flashes of brilliance but smacks of an artist still working out what he wants to say and how he wants to say it. It may not be Peckinpah, but if you're a fan of the genre, it's probably worth a look.The DVD includes a commentary track, storyboards, and behind-the-scenes featurette.Sitting unscared.

Excellent Cadavers Review


Weak
Dull and pedantic, especially for an HBO production. This docudrama about the men who tried to bring down the Palermo mafia could have been much more. Instead, it's barely fit for access TV, big production values aside.

Analyze This Review


Weak

Yes, "Analyze This" has many generous burstsof hilarity, especially with Robert De Niro goofing on the kind of mobsterroles that made him by playing a mafioso with high anxiety.

Yes, casting him as a hoodlum headcase opposite Billy Crystalas his reluctant shrink is damn funny all by itself.

No, this isn't enough to carry the picture. In fact "AnalyzeThis" degrades so dramatically that in the last act Crystal is reducedto ad libbing through an over-long mock-wise guy schtick, taking his bestshot at Robin Williams-dom and tanking.

Continue reading: Analyze This Review

Chazz Palminteri

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Chazz Palminteri Movies

Legend Movie Review

Legend Movie Review

Written and directed with a rakish swagger, and featuring two full-on performances from Tom Hardy,...

Legend - First Look Trailer

Legend - First Look Trailer

Throughout the 1950s and 1960s, London was at the mercy of the terrifying Kray twins...

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A Guide To Recognizing Your Saints Movie Review

A Guide To Recognizing Your Saints Movie Review

Dito Montiel grew up in an ungentrified Astoria, Queens, in the '80s, running with semi-hoodlums...

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A Guide To Recognizing Your Saints Movie Review

A Guide To Recognizing Your Saints Movie Review

Dito Montiel grew up in an ungentrified Astoria, Queens, in the '80s, running with semi-hoodlums...

Little Man (2006) Movie Review

Little Man (2006) Movie Review

Not even White Chicks can prepare you for the badness brought on by Little Man....

Running Scared Movie Review

Running Scared Movie Review

Like Paul Walker's character in it, Running Scared is a lot smarter than it looks....

Hoodwinked Movie Review

Hoodwinked Movie Review

The creative team behind Hoodwinked received their diplomas from the Shrek school of satirical animation....

In the Mix Movie Review

In the Mix Movie Review

Let's get In the Mix's merits out of the way: It actually depicts a young-adult...

Noel Movie Review

Noel Movie Review

Susan Sarandon starring in your movie ought to guarantee a box office bonanza, no? Well,...

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