Charlotte Ayanna

Charlotte Ayanna

Charlotte Ayanna Quick Links

Film RSS

Dancing At The Blue Iguana Review


OK
I'm jaded enough as a film critic to be unsurprised when I see a movie about five strippers, all leading melodramatic and tragic lives.

But when those five strippers are all reasonably B-level or former A-level movie stars, even my ears start to perk up. Even more amazing -- they're all naked.

Continue reading: Dancing At The Blue Iguana Review

Love The Hard Way Review


Good
That shiny Best Actor Oscar notwithstanding, the jury's still out on Adrien Brody's capabilities as an actor. Setting aside The Pianist, what do we have? A solid but small role in Summer of Sam as an anxious '70s punk. A solid but small role in The Thin Red Line as an anxious World War II soldier. A solid but small role in Liberty Heights as an anxious Baltimore Jew. And a journeyman job in his lead in Bread and Roses, where he played an anxious union organizer. All nice enough work, and Lord knows we need somebody to play those anxious roles now that Woody Allen and Bob Balaban are getting on in years. But as an actor, he deserves no more praise than any other young actor who's landed a few good parts -- Brendan Fraser, say, or Philip Seymour Hoffman. Brody is brilliant at playing the wounded man, and in the ear of burly mushmouths like Vin Diesel, that's daring. But it's not necessarily a great acting career.

Love the Hard Way isn't going to settle the matter. As Jack Grace, he's a conflicted, embittered, and, yes, anxious young man who commits small-time crimes in New York City hotel rooms. He and his partner Charlie (Jon Seda) use strippers and acting student to play prostitutes; dressed as cops, Jack and Charlie collar the johns and loot their wallets. It's a cheap life he's got, and Brody is sharp enough to play Jack as a guy who knows it. When he slips on his snazzy snakeskin jacket, he looks like he's trying too hard, and when he says he doesn't care for books or intellectuals, he's lying. His private office - which happens to be a pallet in a storage space - serves as his sanctuary, where he works on novelizing his own life and reading the works of Charles Bukowski and Ezra Pound, first editions of which he buys from a fence.

Continue reading: Love The Hard Way Review

Training Day Review


Extraordinary
How will the tragic events of September 11, 2001 influence violent movies? The box office results of Training Day should answer that question. Warner Bros. did postpone the film's release date for two weeks, but is that enough time for audiences to be ready for such a brutally violent movie?

I think so, although this is a time where audiences may seek romantic comedies over disturbing, awakening dramas. I screened two movies today, this and the juvenile Max Keeble's Big Move. The theater was twice as full for Max than Training Day, which proves that people want uplifting comedies right now. If you're one of those people, Training Day is definitely not for you.

Continue reading: Training Day Review

The Rage - Carrie 2 Review


OK

There are folks out there who like to rent "Carrie," the unintentionallyhigh camp 1976 horror movie, get a group of friends together and treatit like "Rocky Horror."

You know who you are.

Continue reading: The Rage - Carrie 2 Review

Training Day Review


OK

There is one reason and one reason only to see "Training Day" -- watching Denzel Washington sink his teeth into a charismatic role as a chest-thumping, cigarette-chopping, gold chain-wearing, hydraulic low rider-driving, street punk-pounding narcotics cop who is crooked, proud and high on power.

That's not to say the movie doesn't have some other merits -- imposing permanent-sunset photography, a slickly menacing ghetto atmosphere, a strong performance by Ethan Hawke as a patrol officer having his mettle tested for a promotion to Washington's unit of vigilante detectives. But the draw here is seeing a great actor, known for playing roles of incorruptible integrity, go bad.

At once droll and incredibly intimidating, Washington is a knockout as Alonzo Harris, a detective who believes in street justice and enjoys metering out a bit of it himself a couple times a day. His philosophy -- or at least part of it, for the movie is thick with meaty moral dialogue -- is that "it takes a wolf to catch a wolf." And Alonzo fancies himself the Big Bad Wolf.

Continue reading: Training Day Review

Charlotte Ayanna

Charlotte Ayanna Quick Links

Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Charlotte Ayanna Movies

Dancing At The Blue Iguana Movie Review

Dancing At The Blue Iguana Movie Review

I'm jaded enough as a film critic to be unsurprised when I see a movie...

Love the Hard Way Movie Review

Love the Hard Way Movie Review

That shiny Best Actor Oscar notwithstanding, the jury's still out on Adrien Brody's capabilities as...

Training Day Movie Review

Training Day Movie Review

How will the tragic events of September 11, 2001 influence violent movies? The box...

The Rage - Carrie 2 Movie Review

The Rage - Carrie 2 Movie Review

There are folks out there who like to rent "Carrie," the unintentionallyhigh camp 1976 horror...

Training Day Movie Review

Training Day Movie Review

There is one reason and one reason only to see "Training Day" -- watching Denzel...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.