Charles Mckeown

Charles Mckeown

Charles Mckeown Quick Links

Film RSS

The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus Review


Good
Returning to the florid visual style of Time Bandits and The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, Gilliam takes us on a whimsical flight through his imagination with this scruffy, messy movie. The plot doesn't really hang together, but the cast and imagery are magical.

Travelling showman Parnassus (Plummer) performs on the backstreets of London with his lively troupe: his elfin daughter Valentina (Cole), the eager Anton (Garfield) and the tiny Percy (Troyer). One night they encounter an amnesiac, Tony (Ledger), who joins the gang and suggests modernising the show to attract a better audience. What Tony doesn't know is that Parnassus has made a pact with the devilish Nick (Waits), buying immortality in exchange for Valentina's soul on her 16th birthday, which is coming soon. And Tony has some secrets as well.

Continue reading: The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus Review

Brazil Review


Essential
Sam Lowry (Jonathan Pryce) is a civil servant Dilbert at the Ministry of Information. He's a low level office grunt typing his way through a lifetime of meaningless papers in a retro-future totalitarian state. His one escape from his dreary life is his dreams. Bursting with vivid colors, Sam's visions see him with armored wings rising into the bright sky above the cold city. There, in the firmament, Sam battles with Darkness to free a blonde beauty (Kim Greist) imprisoned in a floating cage.

Unfortunately, there are no happy endings for dreamers in this alternate world. Sam always awakens to his mind-numbing existence, only plugging away in a system that rewards only blandness, appeasing his socialite mother (addicted to face lifts) whose only wish is to see her meek son move his way up a corporate ladder to nowhere.

Continue reading: Brazil Review

The Adventures of Baron Munchausen Review


OK
Before he made The Brothers Grimm, The Adventures of Baron Munchausen was arguably Terry Gilliam's least popular film. The story is slow to start, takes too long to finish, and meanders almost irredeemably until finally paying off in the end. The story is adapted from the "tall tale" book of the same name, which gives us a self-proclaimed baron (John Neville in a career-defining role) who regales anyone who'll listen with story after story, each more absurd than the last. The highlight is the film's first major storytelling sequence, a flashback that involves Munchausen and his band of misfits trying to win a bet -- and doing so in amazing style. But so much of the film is so irrelevant that these feel like huge highlights lost in a sea of mediocrity and bad editing.

Ripley's Game Review


Good
Did this movie ever come out theatrically? I would have at least thought it would have found its way here on video, but no, I discovered Ripley's Game on IFC, of all places. This follow-up to The Talented Mr. Ripley (no cast or crew involved, but it's based on another Patricia Highsmith book (the third of five) about Tom Ripley) stars John Malkovich in the role of the older Ripley, this time working as a forged art dealer and relatively callous, spare-time murderer. Ripley convinces a dying man (Dougray Scott) to commit a murder for him, after which all hell breaks loose. Malkovich steals the show and director Liliana Cavani (The Night Porter) does a perfectly serviceable job. See also The American Friend -- Malkovich makes a way better Ripley than Dennis Hopper.

Plunkett & Macleane Review


OK
In 18th century Britain, they sure did have a lot of fireworks and loud rock 'n' roll music...

Continue reading: Plunkett & Macleane Review

American Friends Review


Weak
A quaint true story, American Friends tells the dated fable of an Oxford scholar (Palin) in the mid 1800s who wrestles with abandoning his teaching post at the no-girls-allowed institution in order to run off to the mountains with an American girl (Alvarado). Not quite your Merchant-Ivory bodice-ripper, this tame little number likely wouldn't have even been made if it wasn't about Palin's great grandfather... Hmm...

Brazil Review


Essential
Categorically, one of the greatest films of the century--about a lowly clerk in a postmodern dystopia fighting to regain a sense of self against the all-powerful machine of government tyranny. As fought-over as Citizen Kane. As filled with nuance and meaning as A Clockwork Orange. As prophetic as 1984. Anyone who doesn't like Brazil is a fascist. You can tell them I said so.

Continue reading: Brazil Review

Charles Mckeown

Charles Mckeown Quick Links

Film RSS
Advertisement

Suggested

We Are Your Friends - Trailer

We Are Your Friends - Trailer

This stylish coming-of-age drama, starring Zac Efron, is the directorial debut of Max Joseph (co-creator of MTV's 'Catfish').

Learning To Drive - Trailer

Learning To Drive - Trailer

This feel-good comedy reunites director Isabel Coixet with stars Patricia Clarkson and Ben Kingsley.

Advertisement
Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials - Trailer

Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials - Trailer

Directed by Wes Ball, this second chapter in the sci-fi action saga is based on The Scorch Trials.

Drake Responds To Ghostwriter Allegations With Meek Mill Diss Track 'Charged Up'

Drake Responds To Ghostwriter Allegations With Meek Mill Diss Track 'Charged Up'

Rapper Drake has responded to Meek Mill’s accusations he uses a ‘ghostwriter’ by releasing...

Advertisement