Celine Rattray

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Video - Forest Whitaker Takes Family To 'Black Nativity' NY Premiere - Part 3


'Black Nativity' Forest Whitaker arrived with his wife Keisha Nash Whitaker and daughter Sonnet Whitaker at the movie's New York premiere held at the Apollo Theater. 'Working Girl' actress Melanie Griffith and husband 'Desperado' star Antonio Banderas were also spotted at the event.

Continue: Video - Forest Whitaker Takes Family To 'Black Nativity' NY Premiere - Part 3

Filth Review


Essential

As another full-on Irvine Welsh adaptation Trainspotting did in 1996, this bracingly original movie puts a new filmmaker on the map. Not only is this a loud blast of both style and substance, but it refuses to water down its subject matter, taking us through a shockingly profane story in a way that's both visually inventive and emotionally resonant.

This is the story of Bruce (McAvoy), an Edinburgh detective who's determined to beat his colleagues to a promotion. He's also a relentless womaniser, sexist, racist and drug addict. And he'll do anything to get ahead, hiding the sordid details of his private life from his boss (Sessions) while undermining the other cops at any chance while pretending to be their friends. In quick succession, he gets young Ray (Bell) addicted to cocaine, flirts continually with Amanda (Poots), has a fling with the kinky wife (Dickie) of fellow officer Gus (Lewis), torments Peter (Elliott) about his sexuality, and takes Bladesey (Marsan) on a sex-tourism holiday while making obscene calls to his needy wife (Henderson). All of this happens while Bruce leads the investigation into a grisly murder.

McAvoy dives so far into this role that we barely recognise him in there. Bruce is so amoral that we are taken aback by each degrading moment. And yet McAvoy somehow manages to hold our sympathy due to the film's blackly hilarious tone and a startling undercurrent of real emotion. Even though he's a monster, we see his boyish fragility, especially in surreal sequences involving his therapist (Broadbent), which merge with his fantasies, hallucinations and nightmares. 

Continue reading: Filth Review

Girl Most Likely Review


Very Good

Even though this comedy has a tendency to dip into cartoonish silliness, it's anchored by a razor-sharp performance by Wiig as a woman forced to confront everything she hates about herself. The film is also packed with hilarious moments that keep us laughing, and it also gets surprisingly sexy and emotional along the way.

Wiig plays Imogene, who has done nothing with her career after winning a rising-star playwright award. Then she loses her day job as a listings editor just as her high-flier boyfriend (Petsos) leaves her. When she fakes a suicide attempt to get some attention, she's court-ordered to move in with her free-spirited mother Zelda (Bening) back home in New Jersey. There she struggles with Zelda's colourful boyfriend George (Dillon), who claims to be a top-secret spy, her goofy-inventor brother Ralph (Fitzgerald) and the smart, sexy and very young lodger Lee (Criss) who rents her old bedroom. But just as she's beginning to cope, a family secret shakes her to the core.

Even as the script strains to be improbably zany, Wiig holds the film together with a startlingly honest comical turn. From the start we knew she didn't fit in with her Manhattan friends, and her slightly out-of-control personality is much more suited to the Jersey Shore. Her scenes with Criss are very nicely played, as they develop an unexpected relationship. By contrast, Bening struggles to appear as dim as Zelda seems to be, while Dillon hams it up as her fantasist toy boy and Fitzgerald's Ralph is so nutty that he seems to be from another movie altogether.

Continue reading: Girl Most Likely Review

Celine Rattray and Trudie Styler - Celine Rattray, Mickey Sumner, Trudie Styler Friday 7th September 2012 2012 Toronto International Film Festival - 'Imogene' - Premiere held at Ryerson Theatre - Arrivals

Celine Rattray and Trudie Styler
Celine Rattray and Trudie Styler
Celine Rattray and Trudie Styler
Celine Rattray and Trudie Styler
Celine Rattray and Trudie Styler
Celine Rattray

Celine Rattray - Celine Rattray , Tuesday 17th January 2012 at the New York premiere of 'Coriolanus' shown at the Paris Theater - Red Carpet

Celine Rattray
Celine Rattray

Celine Rattray Friday 25th February 2011 The fourth annual Women In Film Pre-Oscar Cocktail Party presented by Perrier-Jouet and held at Soho House Los Angeles, California

Celine Rattray
Celine Rattray
Cathy Schulman and Celine Rattray

The Kids Are All Right Review


Extraordinary
Five of this year's best screen characters appear in this comedy-drama about a relatively ordinary family facing some unusual challenges. And while the premise seems extremely offbeat, it's actually beside the point.

Nic and Jules (Bening and Moore) have been a couple for more than 20 years, and life is pretty matter-of-fact for them and their two kids, 18-year-old Joni (Wasikowska) and 15-year-old Laser (Hutcherson). Since Joni is now of age, Laser talks her into contacting their mothers' sperm bank so they can meet their biological father. He turns out to be restaurant owner Paul (Ruffalo), a cool guy who shakes their life up in ways none of them could expect. The big question is whether they can ever be the same again.

Continue reading: The Kids Are All Right Review

Celine Rattray Wednesday 30th June 2010 New York premiere of the 'Kids Are All Right' at Landmark's Sunshine Cinema New York City, USA

Celine Rattray

Celine Rattray - Thursday 17th June 2010 at Los Angeles Film Festival Los Angeles, California

Celine Rattray
Celine Rattray
Celine Rattray

Bart Got A Room Review


Excellent
High school coming-of-age films have recently been overflowing movie screens like stuffed toilets. They can be hard-edged and true like Adventureland. Or raunchy yet soft and fuzzy like Superbad. Or they can be totally wacky, as is the case with Brian Hecker's Bart Got a Room.

Hecker's rite-of-passage romp, about a high school senior and resident twerp who strings out getting a prom date until the last second, takes place in an over-baked retirement community in Florida where the youngsters look like sprites among the old-folks majority. Hecker's take on the plastic, ready-to-go community is a nutty cartoonish style, taking its influence from Frank Tashlin -- a place of consumer detritus baking, along with the residents, in the bright light of the leisure world.

Continue reading: Bart Got A Room Review

Watching The Detectives Review


Weak
Watching the Detectives proves that even if you adopt a cool-sounding Elvis Costello song title for your movie, that won't necessarily make it good.

Despite the presence of indie darling Cillian Murphy and teen lust subject Lucy Liu in the leading roles, Detectives is pretty much dead from frame one. Even mega-fans of either of the headliners will have trouble muddling through it.

Continue reading: Watching The Detectives Review

Grace Is Gone Review


Very Good
There are bad choices made by characters in films that infuriate the audience, as nobody can understand why the people on screen would have any reason to do what they are doing. There are also bad choices made by characters which can be instantly understood, as they're the kind of unintelligent behavior which pretty much all those watching can understand doing themselves, given the situation. And since the lamentable choice made by Stanley Phillips (John Cusack) early on in Grace is Gone comes not long after he has discovered that his wife has been killed while serving in Iraq, it would be the rare viewer who wouldn't understand at least some part of why he did it.

Stanley's problem is that the news of Grace's death -- delivered solemnly on a beautiful day by a pair of soldiers who seem carved from headstone granite -- leaves him not only without a wife, but also as the sole provider for a pair of daughters: 12-year-old Heidi and 8-year-old Dawn (played with radiant smarts by, respectively, Shelan O'Keefe and Grace Bednarczyk). So, faced with the horrible news and unsure of when and how to break it to the girls, Stanley hides. A stolid manager at a Home Depot-style store in their quiet Midwestern town, Stanley is the embodiment of dull routine, making it all the more exciting for the girls when he tells them that they're taking off and heading for Enchanted Gardens, a Disneyworld-type theme park where Dawn has always wanted to go. Maybe that will be the right place to tell them, he figures. It's a horrendously bad plan, but given the quiet normalcy of the day and the massive tragedy which Stanley is suddenly tasked with landing on his daughters, it's not shocking at all that he would disappear into a fantasy of sorts, where maybe Grace hasn't died. So off they drive in the SUV with the yellow ribbon magnet on the back, girls curious but thrilled at the sudden adventure, father gripping the wheel tightly while anguish eats him alive from the inside.

Continue reading: Grace Is Gone Review

Dedication Review


OK
Justin Theroux, the director of Dedication, wants to have it both ways, and in this case there's no shame in that. The film aims to mix romantic comedy with indie darkness; the ideal result would be a film with the charm and sweetness of a vintage rom-com with the honesty, wit, and/or realism of a screenplay free of Hollywood fingerprints. Dedication, though, feels like it has its signals crossed -- it zigs when it should zag, and settles for laziness at the most inopportune moments.

Henry (Billy Crudup) is withdrawn, anxious, and openly hostile, and almost certainly suffers from some sort of low-grade mental illness. Despite his unfriendly exterior, he is also an author of children's books who has found success with his only friend and illustrator, Rudy (Tom Wilkinson). When Rudy is unable to complete a sequel to their wildly popular book about a mischievous beaver, their publisher (Bob Balaban) dispatches Lucy (Mandy Moore) to help Henry finish the book. At first, they're at odds, but, well, you know the rest.

Continue reading: Dedication Review

Lonesome Jim Review


Very Good
If you were to saddle Garden State with a far less likeable lead and set it in Indiana, you might end up with this small gem, the latest from actor-cum-director Steve Buscemi. The Lonesome Jim in question (Casey Affleck) returns home ostensibly to find himself, but really he's just there to mooch off his folks until he can plan his next move. The fact that he finds himself in spite of himself saves this film from being a mere installment of "Profiles in Schmuck-itude," even if it ups the cheese factor as a result.

The movie begins with Jim's surprise arrival at his parents' house. His brother, Tim (Kevin Corrigan), still lives there but is less than pleased to see him. His mother, Sally (Mary Kay Place), is overjoyed but clueless as to Jim's unhappiness, even as he breaks down within minutes of walking through the door. And his father, Don (Seymour Cassel), in response to Jim's claim that his breakdown is due to "dehydration," simply suggests a cup of water.

Continue reading: Lonesome Jim Review

Lonesome Jim Review


Very Good
If you were to saddle Garden State with a far less likeable lead and set it in Indiana, you might end up with this small gem, the latest from actor-cum-director Steve Buscemi. The Lonesome Jim in question (Casey Affleck) returns home ostensibly to find himself, but really he's just there to mooch off his folks until he can plan his next move. The fact that he finds himself in spite of himself saves this film from being a mere installment of "Profiles in Schmuck-itude," even if it ups the cheese factor as a result.

The movie begins with Jim's surprise arrival at his parents' house. His brother, Tim (Kevin Corrigan), still lives there but is less than pleased to see him. His mother, Sally (Mary Kay Place), is overjoyed but clueless as to Jim's unhappiness, even as he breaks down within minutes of walking through the door. And his father, Don (Seymour Cassel), in response to Jim's claim that his breakdown is due to "dehydration," simply suggests a cup of water.

Continue reading: Lonesome Jim Review

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John Krasinski Used His Experience To Make The Hollars

John Krasinski Used His Experience To Make The Hollars

In a busy year that has seen John Krasinski star in movies and TV shows, he somehow managed to find the time to direct, produce and star in the new...

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Celine Rattray Movies

Filth Movie Review

Filth Movie Review

As another full-on Irvine Welsh adaptation Trainspotting did in 1996, this bracingly original movie puts...

Girl Most Likely Movie Review

Girl Most Likely Movie Review

Even though this comedy has a tendency to dip into cartoonish silliness, it's anchored by...

The Kids Are All Right Movie Review

The Kids Are All Right Movie Review

Five of this year's best screen characters appear in this comedy-drama about a relatively ordinary...

Watching the Detectives Movie Review

Watching the Detectives Movie Review

Watching the Detectives proves that even if you adopt a cool-sounding Elvis Costello song title...

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Dedication Movie Review

Dedication Movie Review

Justin Theroux, the director of Dedication, wants to have it both ways, and in this...

The Baxter Movie Review

The Baxter Movie Review

We've all seen the romantic comedy where the fair blonde heroine is in the church,...

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