Cecilia Roth

Cecilia Roth

Cecilia Roth Quick Links

Film RSS

I'm So Excited! [Los Amantes Pasajeros] Review


Very Good

Fans of more recent Almodovar films like The Skin I Live In or Volver should be warned about this one, because it harks back to his much cheesier 1980s films with its broad comedy, lurid production values and camp characters. But even if it looks fluffy and silly, there are some serious things going on under the surface, as Almodovar undermines stereotypes and plays with sexuality issues. Although this means that most of the humour is aimed at a gay audience.

It all takes place on a flight from Spain to Mexico, but shortly after take-off the pilot (de la Torre) announces that a mechanical fault means they need to make an emergency landing. Then the passenger Bruna (Duenas) reveals that she's a virginal psychic who sees death ahead, and everyone starts to panic. The flight crew (Camara, Areces and Arevalo) try to distract the passengers from impending doom by performing a choreographed number to the Pointer Sisters' eponymous hit. And when that doesn't work, they lace everyone's drinks with mescaline.

Each person in the first class cabin (economy is sound asleep) has his or her own crisis, including a notorious dominatrix (Roth), a businessman (Torrijo) on a quest, a shady hitman (Yazpik), a just-married groom (Silvestre) who prefers his wife to be asleep, and a man (Toledo) running from his suicidal girlfriend (Vega). And the pilots and flight attendants are also romantically entangled. All of this swirls together like a nutty 1970s Mexican soap, complete with flimsy-looking sets and a sparky mariachi score.

Continue reading: I'm So Excited! [Los Amantes Pasajeros] Review

All About My Mother Review


Very Good
Director Pedro Almodovar explains the relationship between tunnels and the main character of Manuela (Cecila Roth) in All About My Mother with the line: "Manuela runs away. She always runs away on a train, through endless tunnels."

Indeed, Manuela is always moving. With the untimely death of her son, Estoban, she moves to Barcelona to embark upon a search for Estoban's father. In Barcelona, she is constantly moving from one place to another, doing something or another for someone. Save a transsexual prostitute (Antonio San Juan) here, help a pregnant nun (Penelope Cruz) there. Help smooth out the turbulent lesbian relationship between two actresses (Marisa Paredes and Candela Pena) here, usher an older woman (Rosa Maria Sarda) into a great understanding of life there. She never stops.

Continue reading: All About My Mother Review

Lucia, Lucia Review


Very Good
How does an attention-grabber like Lucia, Lucia get a finale so dull, that it actually taints the entire movie? For about 90 minutes, the movie grabs you by the shirt collar with a plot ripe with humor, sex, and character development. And then those last minutes come along like a kazoo solo in a Springsteen working-class anthem, forever altering your experience.

Regardless of that metaphorical solo, Lucia, Lucia blends a lot of different styles effortlessly and is buoyed by a terrific performance by Cecilia Roth in the title role. Lucia is an aging children's book writer who is unsatisfied with her life in Mexico. Everything changes, when her bureaucrat husband, Ramon, disappears at the airport.

Continue reading: Lucia, Lucia Review

Vidas Privadas Review


Good
The melodrama in the 2001 Argentinean release Vidas Privadas ("private lives") is pitched so high that even Douglas Sirk might have balked at it. And it's immediate: The film's opening scenes find preparations being made for the return of beautiful, 42-year-old Cármen to her family home in Buenos Aires after a 20-year absence in order that she might finalize a transfer of her terminally ill father's property. Awaiting her are her mother Sofia (played by Chunchuna Villafañe, an Argentinean Film Critics Association nominee for her work here), her father's peculiarly sensitive doctor, an old friend who works as a kind of talent agent/procurer, and a virtual army of skeletons in the family closet. Among these latter we find one who is very much alive and breathing: the young model Gustavo (played by that hottest of Latin American actors, Gael García Bernal), who is initially hired by Carmen to sate her unusual sexual appetites and with whom she eventually falls in love. At the heart of Vidas Privadas are the unexpected (though easily deduced) complications that arise in this romance.

Sirk aside, the actual inspiration for Vidas Privadas appears to be the recent work of Pedro Almodóvar. The real-life connection is that Cármen is played by Cecilia Roth, wife of Vidas Privadas director Fito Páez and star of Almodóvar's All About My Mother and Talk to Her. Artistically, the connection is that Páez emulates the tone of those two films in his own: Vidas Privadas is directed in a similarly deliberate and tasteful manner, and the melodrama is offered with the same straight-faced, unadorned factuality that seems to have descended to Almodóvar via Robert Bresson. In Almodóvar, the director's unflappable cool counters the outlandishness of the proceedings and his presentation of it; it's like a staring match in which he dares you to take his predicaments lightly. (And in a film like All About My Mother he wins.) In Vidas Privadas the line between the melodramatic and the overwrought is crossed, sometimes with both feet; in a scene such as one in which Gustavo confronts his father about a family secret, the temptation to laugh is too great to ignore.

Continue reading: Vidas Privadas Review

All About My Mother Review


Very Good
Director Pedro Almodovar explains the relationship between tunnels and the main character of Manuela (Cecila Roth) in All About My Mother with the line: "Manuela runs away. She always runs away on a train, through endless tunnels."

Indeed, Manuela is always moving. With the untimely death of her son, Estoban, she moves to Barcelona to embark upon a search for Estoban's father. In Barcelona, she is constantly moving from one place to another, doing something or another for someone. Save a transsexual prostitute (Antonio San Juan) here, help a pregnant nun (Penelope Cruz) there. Help smooth out the turbulent lesbian relationship between two actresses (Marisa Paredes and Candela Pena) here, usher an older woman (Rosa Maria Sarda) into a great understanding of life there. She never stops.

Continue reading: All About My Mother Review

All About My Mother Review


Very Good

Once you get past the fact that this movie takes place in a very Pedro Almodovar world where soccer moms, flamboyant unemployed transvestites, aging stage divas and pregnant nuns all hang around together -- and even date each other -- "All About My Mother" emerges as the brassy Spanish director's most mature and intuitive work yet.

The story of the soccer mom's devastation and perseverance after seeing her 17-year-old son killed in a traffic accident, the film follows the distraught Manuela (Cecilia Roth) from Barcelona to Madrid in a therapeutic search for the boy's father -- now a transvestite -- who never knew he had a child.

In one of Almodovar's delicious twists of irony, as the movie begins Manuela is an organ transplant nurse, who is soon faced with the difficult decision to allow her son's body to be used for spare parts.

Continue reading: All About My Mother Review

Cecilia Roth

Cecilia Roth Quick Links

Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Cecilia Roth Movies

I'm So Excited! [Los Amantes Pasajeros] Movie Review

I'm So Excited! [Los Amantes Pasajeros] Movie Review

Fans of more recent Almodovar films like The Skin I Live In or Volver should...

All About My Mother Movie Review

All About My Mother Movie Review

Director Pedro Almodovar explains the relationship between tunnels and the main character of Manuela (Cecila...

Lucia, Lucia Movie Review

Lucia, Lucia Movie Review

How does an attention-grabber like Lucia, Lucia get a finale so dull, that it actually...

All About My Mother Movie Review

All About My Mother Movie Review

Director Pedro Almodovar explains the relationship between tunnels and the main character of Manuela (Cecila...

All About My Mother Movie Review

All About My Mother Movie Review

Once you get past the fact that this movie takes place in a very Pedro...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.