Cathy Schulman

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Hylda Queally, Cathy Schulman , Cate Blanchett - Women In Film Los Angeles Celebrates The 2016 Crystal + Lucy Awards Presented by Max Mara and BMW at The Beverly Hilton - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Wednesday 15th June 2016

Hylda Queally, Cathy Schulman and Cate Blanchett
Hylda Queally, Cathy Schulman and Cate Blanchett
Hylda Queally, Cathy Schulman and Cate Blanchett
Hylda Queally, Cathy Schulman and Cate Blanchett
Hylda Queally, Cathy Schulman and Cate Blanchett
Hylda Queally, Cathy Schulman and Cate Blanchett

Cathy Schulman - Women In Film 2016 Crystal + Lucy Awards - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 15th June 2016

Cathy Schulman
Cathy Schulman
Cathy Schulman, Natalie Dormer and Nicola Maramotti
Cathy Schulman
Cathy Schulman
Cathy Schulman

Lisa Nishimura, Laison Goss, Cindy Holland, Jane Wiseman, Cathy Schulman, Jane Fonda, Laura Prepon, Krysten Ritter, Chelsea Handler, Dominique Crenn, Jenji Kohan, Carol Kane, Moira Demos, Laura Ricciardi, Gabrielle Carteris, Abby Fuller , Lena Waithe - Netflix's Rebels and Rule Breakers Luncheon and Panel Celebrating The Women of Netflix at Beverly Wilshire Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Saturday 14th May 2016

Lisa Nishimura, Laison Goss, Cindy Holland, Jane Wiseman, Cathy Schulman, Jane Fonda, Laura Prepon, Krysten Ritter, Chelsea Handler, Dominique Crenn, Jenji Kohan, Carol Kane, Moira Demos, Laura Ricciardi, Gabrielle Carteris, Abby Fuller and Lena Waithe
Cathy Schulman
Cathy Schulman
Cathy Schulman
Lisa Nishimura, Laison Goss, Cindy Holland, Jane Wiseman, Cathy Schulman, Jane Fonda, Laura Prepon, Krysten Ritter, Chelsea Handler, Dominique Crenn, Jenji Kohan, Carol Kane, Moira Demos, Laura Ricciardi, Gabrielle Carteris, Abby Fuller and Lena Waithe

Michelle Monaghan , Cathy Schulman - 9th Annual Women in Film Pre-Oscar Cocktail Party at Hyde Sunset Kitchen + Cocktails - Arrivals at HYDE Sunset: Kitchen + Cocktails - West Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 26th February 2016

Michelle Monaghan and Cathy Schulman
Michelle Monaghan
Michelle Monaghan
Michelle Monaghan
Michelle Monaghan
Michelle Monaghan and Cathy Schulman

Cathy Schulman , Jennifer Jason Leigh - 9th Annual Women in Film Pre-Oscar Cocktail Party at Hyde Sunset Kitchen + Cocktails - Arrivals at HYDE Sunset: Kitchen + Cocktails - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 26th February 2016

Cathy Schulman and Jennifer Jason Leigh
Maria Bello and Cathy Schulman
Maria Bello and Cathy Schulman
Alicia Vikander and Cathy Schulman
Alicia Vikander and Cathy Schulman
Jane Fleming, Cathy Schulman and Kristen Schaffer

Horns Review


Good

With his most stylish film yet, horror specialist Alexandre Aja takes a wildly irreverent approach, packing the screen with rude humour, visual flourishes and spiky characters. But it's assembled in such a rapid-fire way that it's difficult to get a handle on anything, which makes the movie feel like a series of outrageous set-pieces without a coherent plot to hold them together. The likeable actors help bring their characters to life, but the film is too hyperactive to let us engage with any of them.

It's set in a small town near Seattle, where Ig (Daniel Radcliffe) is in shock after his childhood sweetheart Merrin (Juno Temple) was violently murdered. Then he becomes the prime suspect, and the media have a field day. So he hires his lifelong pal Lee (Max Minghella) as his lawyer, partly because he's the only person in town who believes he's innocent. This includes Ig's parents (James Remar and Kathleen Quinlan) and brother (Joe Anderson). As the situation continues to deteriorate, Ig suddenly discovers that horns are growing on his head and no one seems very shocked by this. They also seem unable to lie in his presence, so he decides to use this to find out who really killed Merrin. Along the way he gets a shocking glimpse into what everyone in town really thinks about each other.

The film is an assault on the senses, as Aja packs every moment with outrageous sights and sounds, encouraging the actors to sometimes drift over the line into broad slapstick. He also fills the screen with religious imagery, including churches, crosses, pitchforks and snakes, all hinting that Ig's transformation is connected with his loss of faith. Or maybe it's just part of the film's jokey attitude. But as pieces of the central mystery slowly fall into place, the movie seems to become looser and less coherent. Even when the real villain is identified, there's still at least half an hour of flashbacks and revelations, confrontations and conclusions, none of which are particularly surprising or satisfying.

Continue reading: Horns Review

Darfur Now Review


OK
Unlike when the genocide began over a decade ago in Rwanda -- when the Western world couldn't be bothered to lift its head from its own navel and figure out what to do -- the increasingly desperate condition in the Darfur region of Sudan has attracted enormous amounts of attention from around the world, with activists clamoring for their governments to do more to stop the ongoing disaster. Writer/director Theodore Braun's Darfur Now serves initially as a decent introduction to the efforts of this diverse group of dedicated do-gooders, presenting portraits of six people from completely different walks of life into a generalized mini-lecture on the state of the Darfur conflict. But although it begins with the most honorable intentions, the film ultimately fails to serve as the rousing call to action it desires to be, swaddled as it is in muddle-headed hero-worship and a soft-focus PSA style.

The smartest move on Braun's part was the selection of the people he structures his film around. Ahmed Mohammed Abakar is a Darfurian farmer forced by the fighting into a refugee camp where he serves as a de facto leader in exile. The Ecuadorian Pablo Recalde works with the World Food Program, organizing the seemingly impossible task of keeping the thousands of Darfurian refugees from starving to death in a harsh landscape swept by dry winds and the marauding government-backed Arab tribesman known as the janjaweed (literally, devils on horseback) who helped drive them there in the first place. Adam Sterling is a young UCLA student and waiter fighting with admirable determination and stubbornness to get a bill signed that would divest state of California funds from the Sudanese government, as a way of not indirectly funding genocide. Producer Don Cheadle, who co-wrote a book on the crisis called Not on Our Watch, is profiled as well for his efforts, along with a briefly appearing George Clooney, to increase awareness and to pressure governments which do a lot of business in Sudan, like China and Egypt, to divest.

Continue reading: Darfur Now Review

Employee Of The Month (2004) Review


Good
Matt Dillon must have really loved Wild Things. A lot.. Here he appears with Christina Applegate in another circuitous drama/thriller involving lots of cash, this time about a poor guy who loses his job and his girl on the same day. Shortly thereafter, the bank where he worked is robbed. Think he might be in on it? Rest assured, there are about 15 more twists in store for you before the movie's all said and done. Employee of the Month has moments a-plenty both cute and clever, but it doesn't quite generate enough interest to make you really vest yourself in the plot.

The Illusionist Review


Weak
There's something in Paul Giamatti that was just made for the 19th century. With those slightly bulbous but penetrating eyes and stolid weariness, one can imagine him looking out of an old daguerreotype with hat in hand, an emblem of a less superficial age. So it's nice to see Giamatti (so often made to play the whiny comic relief) cast in the otherwise dismissible film The Illusionist as a gruff policeman in fin de siècle Vienna, dropping his voice into a lower register than usual and assuming an impressive stature; honorable but shaded with a tiny bit of incipient corruption. If only everything else in the film worked this well.

Based on a short story by Steven Millhauser, a Pulitzer winner given to tidy exposition and nostalgic settings, The Illusionist concerns a stage magician who was separated from the love of his love due to his peasant roots and her aristocratic family, only to meet her years later on stage, when she is betrothed to a villainous crown prince. The magician, Eisenheim, is played stiffly by Edward Norton, without a shred of humor or self-awareness. Somewhat in keeping with his performance is that by Jessica Biel as his beloved, Sophie von Teschen -- whose beauty helps brighten these lamp-lit rooms, but who is never close to believable as a Viennese noblewoman. Rather more in keeping with the spirit of the rather melodramatic story is Rufus Sewell, as the evil Crown Prince Leopold, who swans through the film with cigarette holder perched lightly in one hand, his face a deliciously, maliciously bored mask.

Continue reading: The Illusionist Review

Crash (2005) Review


Excellent
In Crash, a simple car accident forms an unyielding foundation for the complex exploration of race and prejudice. Thoroughly repulsive throughout, but incredibly thought provoking long after, Paul Haggis' breathtaking directorial debut succeeds in bringing to the forefront the behaviors that many people keep under their skin. And by thrusting these attitudes toward us with a highly calculated, reckless abandon, Haggis puts racism on the highest pedestal for our review.

There is no better place for this examination than the culturally diverse melting pot of modern-day Los Angeles. In just over 24 hours, Crash brings together people from all walks of life. Two philosophizing black men (Ludacris and Larenz Tate) steal the expensive SUV belonging to the white, L.A. District Attorney (Brendan Fraser), and his high-strung wife (Sandra Bullock). A similar vehicle belonging to a wealthy black television director (Terrence Howard) and his wife (Thandie Newton) is later pulled over by a racist cop (Matt Dillon) and his partner (Ryan Phillippe). Soon, many of these people get mixed up with a Latino locksmith (Michael Peña), a Persian storekeeper (Shaun Toub), and two ethnically diverse, dating police detectives (Don Cheadle and Jennifer Esposito).

Continue reading: Crash (2005) Review

You Stupid Man Review


Weak
You Stupid Man. Well that's a title that is going to make people rush to Blockbuster. What sounds like a sex comedy (a sultry Denise Richards on the cover doesn't help) turns out to be a semisweet, if goofy, romantic comedy, albeit a nerdy David Krumholtz and a blank-slate Milla Jovovich don't exactly make for cinema's most energetic couple.

Krumholtz starts the film with Richards, an up-and-coming actress who's soon in New York as a headliner on a new sitcom. Soon she's having an affair, gets busted, and sends poor Davie home alone.

Continue reading: You Stupid Man Review

Crash (2004) Review


Excellent
In Crash, a simple car accident forms an unyielding foundation for the complex exploration of race and prejudice. Thoroughly repulsive throughout, but incredibly thought provoking long after, Paul Haggis' breathtaking directorial debut succeeds in bringing to the forefront the behaviors that many people keep under their skin. And by thrusting these attitudes toward us with a highly calculated, reckless abandon, Haggis puts racism on the highest pedestal for our review.

There is no better place for this examination than the culturally diverse melting pot of modern-day Los Angeles. In just over 24 hours, Crash brings together people from all walks of life. Two philosophizing black men (Ludacris and Larenz Tate) steal the expensive SUV belonging to the white, L.A. District Attorney (Brendan Fraser), and his high-strung wife (Sandra Bullock). A similar vehicle belonging to a wealthy black television director (Terrence Howard) and his wife (Thandie Newton) is later pulled over by a racist cop (Matt Dillon) and his partner (Ryan Phillippe). Soon, many of these people get mixed up with a Latino locksmith (Michael Peña), a Persian storekeeper (Shaun Toub), and two ethnically diverse, dating police detectives (Don Cheadle and Jennifer Esposito).

Continue reading: Crash (2004) Review

Sidewalks Of New York Review


Very Good
Edward Burns' best movies rarely show the busy intersections and tall buildings of New York City. He covers the blue-collar attitude perfectly, representing a side of the Empire State most moviegoers rarely see anymore. I think that's why his first film, The Brothers McMullen, was so appreciated. It's also why I own No Looking Back, a telling look of working class malaise, on videotape.

Like a lot of other New Jersey and New York residents, Burns can't help but be tempted by the city life. In his fourth film, Sidewalks of New York, he examines three men and three women whose romantic lives intersect. It's a pleasant and amusing turn after the potent dreariness of No Looking Back. But why do I get the feeling that anyone could have directed Sidewalks? I guess it's because setting a romantic comedy in New York City seems silly, if you can't capitalize on the atmosphere. And Burns can't. Try as he may, he's still a big city outsider. And I think he's better off that way.

Continue reading: Sidewalks Of New York Review

Godsend Review


Weak
Watching Godsend compares to eating a gallon of fudge-filled chocolate ice cream minutes before going to bed. You know it's bad for you, but the experience is tons of fun. Soon enough, though, the gooey dessert stops tasting so good. By the time you near the bottom of the container, you can't even justify why you continue to swallow spoonfuls, but you keep eating despite the fact that it doesn't make sense to continue.

That also explains director Nick Hamm's jackhammer approach to his material. He knows he's working with a cheesy campfire story, the kind best whispered to terrified boy scouts in the dead of night. But he's sadly unaware of when enough is enough, and his final act becomes a series of ludicrous scientific explanations offset by cheap jolts to our nervous system.

Continue reading: Godsend Review

Cathy Schulman

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Green Man 2016 - Live Review

Green Man 2016 - Live Review

Green Man has become a festival season highlight.

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Cathy Schulman Movies

Horns Movie Review

Horns Movie Review

With his most stylish film yet, horror specialist Alexandre Aja takes a wildly irreverent approach,...

The Illusionist Movie Review

The Illusionist Movie Review

There's something in Paul Giamatti that was just made for the 19th century. With those...

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Crash (2005) Movie Review

Crash (2005) Movie Review

In Crash, a simple car accident forms an unyielding foundation for the complex exploration of...

Crash (2004) Movie Review

Crash (2004) Movie Review

In Crash, a simple car accident forms an unyielding foundation for the complex exploration of...

Godsend Movie Review

Godsend Movie Review

Watching Godsend compares to eating a gallon of fudge-filled chocolate ice cream minutes before going...

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