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Hailee Steinfeld - Begin Again Red Carpet Interview


Video interview with Hailee Stansfield

Hailee Steinfeld discusses filming in New York and her fellow cast in a red carpet interview during the Tribeca Film Festival premiere of her new movie 'Begin Again', in which she stars alongside Mark Ruffalo, Adam Levine and Keira Knightley.

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'Enough Said' Trailer Released: James Gandolfini's Final Comedy Looks Warm, Smart And Funny


James Gandolfini Toni Collette Catherine Keener Nicole Holofcener

The trailer has been released for Enough Said; a rom-com that will bear a more potent poignancy for those who were fans of the late James Gandolfini, star of The Sopranos. The actor died in June after an unexpected heart attack, whilst on holiday in Rome, but his death didn't mean he couldn't keep entertaining post-humously.

Watch The Enough Said Trailer:

Continue reading: 'Enough Said' Trailer Released: James Gandolfini's Final Comedy Looks Warm, Smart And Funny

Video - Hugh Laurie And Catherine Keener Are Surprised At 'The Oranges' Age Gap Shock


Hugh Laurie and Catherine Keener talk kissing and music during a press junket at New York's Crosby Hotel for their hilarious new movie 'The Oranges'. Hugh, 53, is asked why his onscreen kiss with 26-year-old Leighton Meester has been made into a 'big thing' in America. 'I don't know the answer to that not having seen the kiss itself', he said. 'Is it shocking?' But Catherine chimes in that she's used to seeing that kind of age gap in LA: 'It's pretty much the norm there.'

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Trust Review


Excellent
Even though this film has a deeply disturbing theme, one of the most frightening things about it is the way it continually threatens to turn into a revenge thriller. But the filmmakers have something much more involving - and wrenching - in mind.

Will and Lynn (Owen and Keener) are parents of three lively, independent-minded kids. Peter (Curnutt) is just heading off to university, 14-year-old Annie (Liberato) is starting high school and Katie (DeButch) is still too young to understand much of what happens next. Annie is chatting online with Charlie, a teen in another city who slowly becomes her closest confidant. So she's a bit startled when he confesses that he's 20. Then 25. Then he agrees to meet her and turns out to be closer to 35 (Coffey). But he loves her and makes her feel beautiful.

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Cyrus Review


Excellent
This twisted variation on the romantic-comedy takes a sharply funny look at male relationships. And Reilly and Hill get to shine in extremely vivid characters that keep us both laughing and cringing with fear over what might happen next.

After seven years, John (Reilly) still hasn't got over the break-up of his marriage to Jamie (Keener), but now that she's marrying Tim (Walsh) he really should move on. At a party, he meets Molly (Tomei), an improbably hot woman who actually seems to like his goofy behaviour, and their relationship gets serious very quickly. But Molly's 21-year-old son Cyrus (Hill) isn't quite ready for his mother to settle down with another man and launches a silent campaign to scupper the romance.

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Please Give Review


Excellent
Writer-director Holofcener cleverly keeps the emotions gurgling right under the surface of this engaging interpersonal comedy. It's more about smiles than laughing out loud, but the superior cast members get terrific characters to play with.

Kate and Alex (Keener and Platt) are socially active New Yorkers, supporting charities and trying to help their feisty teen daughter (Steele) understand what's important. But Kate's beginning to feel guilty about their work; they buy furniture from families with recently deceased relatives and resell it at a profit. This is taken to the extreme as they wait for their aging neighbour (Guilbert) to die so they can annex her apartment, and Kate and Alex struggle with how to interact with her very different granddaughters (Hall and Peet).

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Cyrus Trailer


John's ex-wife is about to get remarried - John isn't really ready to move on yet. When the down on his luck divorcee finally finds a new 'woman of his dreams' he discovers she has another man in her life, her son Cyrus.

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Please Give Trailer


Kate and her husband Alex own a trendy furniture store on Fifth Avenue; the products they buy come from estate sales. This is just the start of one of the many problems Kate is developing with her way of life. Materialism seems to have become a big part of her life and it also appears her way of life has rubbed off on her teenage daughter. Trying to balance a work and homelife with her husband is also taking a toll - not to mention their old next door neighbour whose flat they want to develop.

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Percy Jackson & The Olyimpians: The Lightning Thief Review


Good
To say this film has heavy echoes of Harry Potter is an understatement.

Although, the Greek-gods premise lets the filmmakers indulge in some visually whizzy sequences that keep this rather lightweight action movie entertaining.

Percy (Lerman) is a New York teen whose mother (Keener) has never told him that his father is the god Poseidon (McKidd) and his best pal Grover (Jackson) is actually a protector satyr. When Zeus (Bean) discovers that his lightning bolt has been stolen, he blames Percy. So Percy has to learn quickly who he is so he can find the lightning thief and restore peace to feuding brothers Poseidon, Zeus and Hades (Coogan). In addition to Grover, he gets help from a professor-centaur (Brosnan) and his fellow demigod Annabeth (Daddario).

Continue reading: Percy Jackson & The Olyimpians: The Lightning Thief Review

Where The Wild Things Are Review


Excellent
Jonze's inventive approach to Maurice Sendak's classic children's book continually confounds our expectations with an approach that's so offhanded and fresh that it might feel awkward or strange. But it's a real grower.

Max (Records) is a mischievous, imaginative pre-teen with a dismissive big sister (Emmerichs) and an understanding mum (Keener). But a series of events get him thinking about the fragility of life, so he takes a flight of fantasy to a distant island populated by furry creatures who at first threaten to eat him but then adopt him as their king. Playful games ensue, as he leads them in the construction of a giant fortress. But even here, relationships become tricky to navigate.

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Where The Wild Things Are Trailer


Watch the Alternative Trailer for new Spike Jonze Movie Where The Wild Things Are

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The Soloist Review


Good
Joe Wright's worlds-colliding drama The Soloist has so many strikes against it that it's hard to imagine coming out the other end feeling anything but relief that it was over. Think of it: a based-on-a-true-story about a cold-hearted journalist who meets a mentally disturbed homeless man who just happens to be a world-class musician. Together, the two strike up a unique friendship against the backdrop of Los Angeles's Dickensian skid row and imploding newspaper industry; a bright flower blooming from the crack in a downtown sidewalk. Also, one of the men happens to be black and the other white.

On paper, the treacle-meter for The Soloist is nearly off the charts. But while Wright (Atonement) hasn't fashioned anything like a classic, and the screenplay by Susannah Grant (Erin Brockovich) is frequently thin on motivation, the film is not even close to the disaster that it should have been. This is higher praise than it may sound.

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Hamlet 2 Trailer


Watch the trailer for Hamlet 2.

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Synecdoche, New York Review


Weak
If it weren't for Charlie Kaufman, the phrase "famous screenwriter" would be an oxymoron. Kaufman has never won an Oscar, and most people, even true movie geeks, probably couldn't pick him out of a police lineup, but he's the only writer in Hollywood whose name is used to promote his movies. From Being John Malkovich and Adaptation to Confessions of a Dangerous Mind and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, each of Kaufman's movies is a singular experience -- quirky, affecting, and humorous. Kaufman's renown as a screenwriter even surpasses that of Quentin Tarantino's back in the mid-nineties, when he penned a string of critical and box-office hits that included Reservoir Dogs, True Romance, and Pulp Fiction. Tarantino's real acclaim, however, came as a result of his work behind the camera, not the keyboard. So it's no surprise to find Kaufman making the same transition in Synecdoche, New York -- his debut film as a director.

Synecdoche (sih-NECK-doh-kee) is a word whose meaning is too long to type out here -- and isn't essential to understanding the film, anyway. But it's just the type of word you might throw in the title of your first movie as a director if you wanted to let people know in advance they're in for something offbeat. And Synecdoche, New York is nothing if not determinedly offbeat.

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What Just Happened Review


Excellent
In Hollywood, hundreds of jobs and millions of dollars can hinge upon a leading man's decision to shave. Just look at Bruce Willis. Not in real life... but in What Just Happened, where Willis appears as himself. In the film, he's been cast in a big movie, but he's put on a few pounds since his last picture, and has decided to grow a shaggy beard.

This doesn't settle well with the studio that's paying $20 million for a man with sex-appeal; they don't want someone who resembles Santa Claus. If Willis doesn't shave and drop some weight, the studio will pull the plug on the movie and sue for damages. But Willis has been growing the beard for six months and wants to make an artistic statement. He's not going to be picking up a can of shaving cream anytime soon.

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What Just Happened Trailer


Trailer for What Just Happened

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Synecdoche, New York Trailer


Watch the trailer for Synecdoche, New York

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Hamlet 2 Review


OK
Andrew Fleming's Hamlet 2, a hot potato at this year's Sundance Film Festival which was purchased by Focus Features, takes nothing seriously and that should be taken both literally and pervasively. The humor has an illimitable ardor for defecating on political correctness but it has a similar indifference toward any sort of continuity in filmmaking, storytelling, or style. Written by Fleming and Pam Brady, the film brandishes the sort of overtly offensive, partisan political taunting gags and guffaws that one might find on Comedy Central's South Park, the show Ms. Brady writes for regularly.

In the Mesa high school in Tucson where Fleming sets his gonzo theatrics, culture is either alive-and-well or being beaten to death with a sack full of cantaloupes, depending on who you talk to. The drama department has just finished a stage production of Steven Soderbergh's Erin Brockovich, under the tutelage of Dana Marschz (Steve Coogan). An actor who hit his peak on commercials for herpes medication and Jack LaLanne's Power Juicer (two products that aren't always mutually exclusive), Marschz has moved his wife (Catherine Keener) and random friend Dave (David Arquette) to Arizona to teach acting. It's the first day of the new semester when Marschz finds out that his class has grown from a closeted homosexual (Skylar Astin) and a goody-two-shoes (Phoebe Strole) to an entire class made up mostly of Latino outcasts and some white dude who has a jones for rave culture. It's no small wonder that Marschz's dementia, once goofy and lovable, becomes unstable and leads concurrently to the attempted dismantling of the drama department and the writing of Marschz's titular brainchild, Hamlet 2.

Continue reading: Hamlet 2 Review

Catherine Keener - Friday 23rd May 2008 at Cannes Film Festival Cannes, France

Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener, Michelle Williams and Samantha Morton
Catherine Keener, Michelle Williams and Samantha Morton
Catherine Keener, Michelle Williams and Samantha Morton
Catherine Keener, Michelle Williams and Samantha Morton
Catherine Keener, Michelle Williams and Samantha Morton

Catherine Keener and Calvin Klein Thursday 7th February 2008 Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Fall 2008 - Calvin Klein after party and private dinner held at the Waverly Inn - Arrivals New York City, USA

Catherine Keener and Calvin Klein

Catherine Keener - Sunday 27th January 2008 at Screen Actors Guild Los Angeles, California

Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener

Into The Wild Review


Very Good
One day, you just pack up your essentials in a backpack, do away with all forms of identification, and set off on the road to find that piece of blue sky that's been missing from your puzzle. Such is the task taken on by young Chris McCandless (Emile Hirsch) when he set out in the summer of 1990 hoping to reach the blustery ether of Alaska. Abandoning a life of charm, money, and an equally rebellious sister (Jena Malone), McCandless walked, hitched, and explored America for two years before he died from starvation and partial poisoning on the outskirts of Denali National Park in Alaska.

Four years later, Outside magazine contributor Jon Krakauer documented McCandless' travels in his debut novel Into the Wild, which serves as a blueprint for Sean Penn's adaptation of McCandless' life. Look at me cross-eyed all you want but this tale of "a rebellious 1990s Thoreau" (as the press notes ponder he might be) brings out a buoyancy in director and terminal humbug Penn that's been absent in his filmography thus far. One might think Penn would be more apt to adapt Krakauer's recent Under the Banner of Heaven instead, but his direction in Wild is astute and brisk though not always as concise as one would hope.

Continue reading: Into The Wild Review

Friends With Money Review


Excellent
It's hard to be in L.A. - to live, to visit, to see in movies - and not think that being jaw-droppingly wealthy is the only way to live life. People drive tricked-out cars worth as much as the (astronomical) average housing price and think nothing of tossing away a few hundred on a pair of ripped jeans because they hug the butt just so. This casual relationship with opulence is the setting for Friends with Money, writer-director Nicole Holofcener's (Walking and Talking, Lovely & Amazing) new comedy about how tough the world can be for the haves and the have-mores.Not some "money doesn't solve everything" morality play - if anything, money solves a heck of a lot here - we instead get a more general look at the dissatisfaction and ennui striking women of a certain age, regardless of whether they are rich or not. (But not, apparently, if they are really, really rich - then they get to be happy.) It's familiar ground for Holofcener, whose semi-feminist films always follow a group of women trying to work out a sense of identity at a particular stage of life.So what do these women, walking illustrations of "having it all," have to complain about? Well, for Christine (Catherine Keener, a Holocener mainstay), the problem is her crumbling marriage to an unsympathetic and superior screenwriting partner/husband. Jane (Frances McDormand) is a chichi clothing designer in a life crisis that who quits washing her hair and is sent into fits of apoplectic rage by everyday aggravations in traffic and customer service. It's very baffling to her sweet, sympathetic, and very probably straight husband. Only Franny (Joan Cusack), the wealthiest of the bunch, seems to have a functioning marriage and a deeply satisfying life as a stay-at-home-mom (with full time help, of course - no need to be primitive).And then there is Olivia (Jennifer Aniston); poor, unmarried, childless, house cleaner Olivia. She is likely supposed to be the stunted one, but... it's still Jennifer Aniston; she's hardly a plebe. Olivia has taken to drifting through life, smoking a lot of pot, obsessively stalking a past (married) lover, and letting her current guy degrade mistreat her - and pay for the privilege. The film's title (and casting) suggest that Olivia is meant to be the focus, but her melancholic foundering isn't really given a priority in screen time. It's a good thing, too, considering her passivity doesn't always make her the most interesting.Friends offers little indication how these four women became close, with Olivia so much younger and leading an utterly different life. Franny comments that she isn't certain whether they still would be friends if they met now; but for the other two, there is the feeling they keep Olivia around to maintain a sense of superiority - their lives may be disintegrating, but at least they aren't maids. Olivia clearly has a tendency towards masochism, but at least her friendships offer something to aspire to.That is the crux of the appeal - and potentially off-putting nature - of Holofcener's work: Her women are complicated, troubled, and often inscrutable. They are not always likeable, or fleshed out to minute details, and they rarely experience grand transformations or realizations. But they are always relatable - who hasn't wanted to lash out when someone brazenly cuts in line and totally gets away with it? - and Holofcener writes them brilliantly acerbic and sharp, so her script stays jaunty and blithe (lean, too, at under 90 minutes).It might have no real resolutions to speak of, and male characters are shallowly drawn and peripheral at best, but Friends with Money is the kind of chick flick that offers genuine accessibility instead of rah-rah sisterhood empowerment. And if still working on figuring out who you are when you're already supposed to be a grown up offers no kinship, well, we've all sat awake at night, pondering where to donate that extra two mil so it doesn't burn us at tax time.Friend with monkey.

The Interpreter Review


OK
Astute moviegoers will recall that this isn't the first time Nicole Kidman has saved the world -- and especially the United Nations -- from destruction. And while 1997's The Peacemaker was a guilty pleasure of high intrigue and adventure, the flaccid The Interpreter doesn't generate half the excitement, kitschy or no.

The contrived setup gives us Nic as one Silvia Broome, a long-time resident of Africa who now makes a living as an interpreter at the UN. The headlines have a hated president from her homeland by the name of Zuwanie who's accused of genocide coming to give a speech to the General Assembly; most observers assume that the speech will save him from being tried for crimes against humanity as he pledges democratic reforms, and so his enemies are -- possibly -- planning to murder him at the podium. Or at least that's what Silvia says, as she overhears a potential plot late one night in her talkin' booth when she returns to the UN to get her "flutes and stuff."

Continue reading: The Interpreter Review

The 40 Year-Old Virgin Review


Excellent
In The 40 Year-Old Virgin, budding comedian Steve Carell plays a geeky middle-aged virgin. This is not a stretch for Carell, because in his acting career, he really is a virgin. Until his breakthrough role in this film, Carell long roamed the desolate comedic sidelines behind bigger names like Will Ferrell, Jim Carrey, and Jon Stewart. And yet, despite being relegated to small supporting roles, Carell has consistently and feverously out-shined and out-muscled his senior counterparts. Now, with Virgin, Carell proves that he's got the stamina to go the distance in his first leading role.

On the surface, I can't envision too many actors who look the part of a stereotypical 40-year-old virgin better than Carell. (He co-wrote the film with Freaks and Geeks alumn Judd Apatow.) You might even consider his role as the awkward weatherman in Anchorman as a warm-up to this part. Despite being severely handicapped by a lackluster libido, Carell's Andy Stitzer has everything that makes him happy: a great job at an electronics store called Smart Tech, an action figure and comic collection worth thousands of dollars, and a reliable bicycle that gets him to and from work every day.

Continue reading: The 40 Year-Old Virgin Review

Simpatico Review


OK
I love a good thriller. And no one makes good thrillers any more. Enter Simpatico, with a cast boasting both Nick Nolte and Jeff Bridges, not to mention Albert Finney and Sharon Stone -- all set among the intrigue of a scandal involving horse racing, blackmail, and steamy sex. How could this miss?

By being as straightforward as, well, a horse race. It's just a big loop from start to finish. No real surprises along the way, just jockeying for position. Simpatico finishes right where it started, with a time of 106 minutes.

Continue reading: Simpatico Review

Lovely & Amazing Review


Extraordinary
Lovely & Amazing, Nicole Holofcener's follow-up to her feature debut Walking And Talking, doesn't quite rank with suburban classics like Ordinary People and American Beauty -- it never takes itself quite seriously enough for that; but it has the right makings for a memorable movie experience. Simple, sweet, and direct, this sensational portrait of engaging characters ranks as one of the year's best movies to date.

The film observes the daily rituals of four hapless but elastic women as they struggle with various demands of their eventful lives. While most movies would become lost in the complicated world of these spontaneous situations, Lovely & Amazing simply observes as the characters deal with thought-provoking issues involving relationships, health, age, romance, and work.

Continue reading: Lovely & Amazing Review

Walking And Talking Review


Excellent
Well, a lot more talking than walking.... And not to be confused with last year's Kicking and Screaming.

And not at all a bad movie, and the most aptly titled film out right now. Walking and Talking is basically just that, focusing on best friends Laura (Anne Heche) and Amelia (Catherine Keener) and their comedic struggles with life and love at the dawn of the big 3-0.

Continue reading: Walking And Talking Review

Capote Review


Excellent
Capturing the inspirational process of a quirky character can be a daunting task. You have to weigh informational material with a big personality, and keep these two balanced over the course of a changing story without getting bogged down with proving a truth or allowing an actor to get so overwhelming that you miss the entire point of the film.

Hence why Philip Seymour Hoffman is such a perfect choice to play Truman Capote in a film about the research that became the book In Cold Blood. Not only does he look like him and sound like him, but because Capote was such an enormous personality in his own right, the smallest glimpse into Hoffman's movements or talk speaks volumes. He conveys so much with so little, and he's able to provide an amazing performance of the four years it took to write his biggest seller.

Continue reading: Capote Review

The Real Blonde Review


OK
Daryl Hannah plays the titular character in The Real Blonde, which does not bode well, considering the fact that the last film in which Hannah had this distinction was 1993's Attack of the 50 Foot Woman. Nonetheless, the film manages to achieve a degree of respectability (far surpassing the debacle that was Attack of the 50 Foot Woman), but not much else.

The subjects of this film are the intertwined worlds of modeling, soap operas, and music videos in New York City, and given the nature of these industries, it is obvious from the beginning that the film's director (Tom DiCillo of Living in Oblivion fame) is setting us up for another stale commentary about the superficiality of these image industries with little actual plot to revolve around.

Continue reading: The Real Blonde Review

Being John Malkovich Review


Good
The question on everybody's lips would be: Why John Malkovich?

The centerpiece of Being John Malkovich, in case you haven't guessed, is a portal, which provides the unique opportunity to "be John Malkovich." As one character, when approached with the chance, exuberantly improvises, "Great! That was my second choice." Which leads us right back where we started. Why John Malkovich?

Continue reading: Being John Malkovich Review

The Ballad Of Jack And Rose Review


Very Good
For some people isolation means happiness. Such is the case of Jack and Rose, father and daughter (Daniel Day-Lewis and Camilla Belle), living sparingly and deeply enjoying it on an island off the Pacific Northwest. In earlier days, it was the setting for a commune -- one that Jack built, led, and closed down as times and manias changed. Now, with the funds from a buyout in his bank account, his comforts are secure, and that's a bit of heaven for Rose who not only adores her father and cherishes her life, but will protect both with all her energy and life force.

A couple of problems threaten to spoil the remote idyll. Jack has a terminal heart condition and they both know his days are numbered. What each wants to do about it differs monumentally. For her part, Rose is devoted to the idea of committing suicide as soon as dad leaves his mortal coil, feeling she couldn't face life without him. In the wisdom of maturity and a wider scope of options, Jack would like to live out the remainder of his life with a companion who, at the same time, would become a replacement adult supervisor for teenager Rose when he's gone. Nice plan -- one that even a normal father might well dream up. And, since he's been dating Kathleen (Catherine Keener) during his rare visits to the mainland, and likes her, he asks her to come live with him and Rose.

Continue reading: The Ballad Of Jack And Rose Review

Your Friends And Neighbors Review


Good
What does anyone in Hollywood know? You can make a movie with absolutely no likeable characters.

Neil LaBute does exactly that with this highly anticipated follow-up to In the Company of Men, a film so anti-humanity it's practically a sequel.

Continue reading: Your Friends And Neighbors Review

The Ballad Of Jack & Rose Review


Weak
"The Ballad of Jack and Rose" concerns several strange characterswho just scream for something strange and unusual to say. But writer/directorRebecca Miller, daughter of playwright Arthur Miller, only gives them themost ordinary, mundane movie dialogue imaginable.

Miller sets her story, about an ailing father (Daniel Day-Lewis)and his teenage daughter (Camilla Belle), in and around an abandoned 1970shippie commune.

Father Jack and daughter Rose have lived an isolated life,farming and building tree forts, and have turned out rather odd.

Jack ordinarily spends a good deal of time railing againstan evil housing developer (Beau Bridges) who is looking to spoil the island.But for a change of pace, he impulsively invites his secret lover, Kathleen(Catherine Keener), and her two sons, chunky Rodney (Ryan McDonald) andthuggish Thaddius (Paul Dano) to move in. Although this new trio has notbeen raised in a commune, they're just as troubled as Jack and Rose, andtalk just as blandly.

Continue reading: The Ballad Of Jack & Rose Review

Full Frontal Review


Good

After going from esoteric art house darling to Oscar-winning mainstream mogul without losing his soul, it was probably inevitable that Steven Soderbergh would eventually make an industry farce -- and "Full Frontal" is the consummate ironic marriage of his two worlds.

The cinematic equivalent of an Escher painting, it's movie within a movie within a movie within a movie that keeps folding in on itself. Low-budget ($2 million) but awash in big names (Julia Roberts, Brad Pitt, David Duchovny), it's also a joke within a joke within a joke. Sometimes the joke is on Hollywood mucky-mucks. Sometimes the joke is on fans of his mainstream success ("Erin Brockovich," "Ocean's Eleven"). And sometimes the joke is on art film snobs who can't understand why Soderbergh, the artuer behind left-field flicks like "Schitzopolis," "The Limey" and "sex, lies & videotape," would have ever "gone Hollywood" to begin with.

On one level "Full Frontal" is an over-lit, digi-video, fly-on-the-wall guerilla-style picture following several cross-pollinating characters both inside and on the fringes of the filmmaking industry. David Hyde Pierce plays a melancholy milksop writer for Los Angeles Magazine whose first screenplay is being produced. Catherine Keener is his petulant, borderline-lunatic wife, a human resources director who torments nervous employees in erratic, interrogation-style interviews by day, and by night becomes a Hollywood hanger-on with delusions of significance. Mary McCormack plays her sister, a manicly depressed massage therapist who gets sexually harassed by a bigwig movie producer (David Duchovny), who wants help with his autoerotic fantasies.

Continue reading: Full Frontal Review

Lovely & Amazing Review


Weak

In the 1996 modest and little-seen relationship comedy delight "Walking and Talking," writer-director Nicole Holofcener demonstrated a preternatural knack for capturing the bonds between women with her candid and vicarious style of emotion honesty and funny, true-to-life dialogue. But her second independent film, "Lovely and Amazing," fails to find the same spark as it eavesdrops on a family of gratingly neurotic and insecure women.

Sad-eyed Brenda Blethyn, a specialist at screwed-up moms ("Little Voice," "Secrets and Lies"), is the emotionally messy matriarch, who spends most of the movie in the hospital due to complications from liposuction surgery. Doped up on painkillers and more depressed than usual (in part because her flirtations with her plastic surgeon aren't getting anywhere), she still has complaints about her daughters at the ready.

"One's really f**ked up," she tells the doctor, "and the other one isn't married."

Continue reading: Lovely & Amazing Review

Death To Smoochy Review


Good

It's so comforting to see Robin Williams in yet another family movie, playing a psychotic kiddie show clown fired from his job and bent on murdering the guy in the purple rhino suit who took his place...

Hey! Wait a minute!

Truth be told, it is so refreshing to see Robin Williams turn 180 degrees from the string of insultingly innocuous and sappy fiascoes he's been making almost habitually for the last several years ("Bicentennial Man," "Patch Adams," etc.) and dive headlong into "Death to Smoochy," a relentlessly dark farce that takes place in the fictitiously cutthroat world of children's television.

Continue reading: Death To Smoochy Review

Being John Malkovich Review


Excellent

Unrivaled as the most inventive and wildly conceptual movie of 1999, there's just no way to explain "Being John Malkovich" without it sounding too weird to be for real.

The daring feature debut of music video and commercial director Spike Jonze, the film stars a disheveled John Cusack as an unemployed, master puppeteer and social malcontent who discovers a portal into the mind of actor John Malkovich when he takes a peon filing job at an esoteric office on the 7 1/2th floor of turn-of-the-Century Manhattan high-rise.

See? I told you.

Continue reading: Being John Malkovich Review

Adaptation Review


Excellent

Poking around in the mind of John Malkovich was a wonderfully weird, wildly conceptual experience in 1999's "Being John Malkovich," but the ingenious "Adaptation" is a testament to the fact that screenwriter Charlie Kaufman's head is an even more peculiar place.

Kaufman is the off-kilter mastermind behind both films, and while the former was a dark, cerebellum-warping, fictional funhouse ride, the latter began life simply as a commission to adapt Susan Orleans' novel "The Orchid Thief." What the project morphed into, however, is something far more bizarre because Kaufman's unbridled and bewildered efforts to turn the book into a movie began bleeding into the screenplay itself.

In the deft and innovative hands of "Malkovich" director Spike Jonze, three cross-pollinating narratives are stitched together in an extraordinary patchwork of idiosyncratic storytelling: First, the film follows the plot of "The Orchid Thief," which is, in part, about the misfiring conservation philosophies of a real Florida flower poacher named John Laroche (Chris Cooper), who took Orleans (Meryl Streep) into the Everglades on excursions to steal protected orchids that he then breeds to sell in his flower shop.

Continue reading: Adaptation Review

Catherine Keener

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Catherine Keener

Date of birth

23rd March, 1959

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.73


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George Ezra - Hold My Girl Video

Seven months after the release of his second album 'Staying At Tamara's', George Ezra unveils the video to his newest single 'Hold My Girl'.

Halsey - Without Me Video

Halsey - Without Me Video

After teaming up with Benny Blanco and Khalid on the song 'Eastside' earlier this year, Halsey returns with her newest single 'Without Me'.

Kesha - Here Comes The Change (From the Motion Picture 'On The Basis of Sex') Video

Kesha - Here Comes The Change (From the Motion Picture 'On The Basis of Sex') Video

Kesha's latest single is 'Here Comes The Change' from the soundtrack of an important new biographical drama entitled 'On the Basis of Sex'.

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Catherine Keener Movies

Incredibles 2 Trailer

Incredibles 2 Trailer

Following events in 'The Incredibles' whereby the Parr family defeated the supervillain Syndrome and his...

Get Out Movie Review

Get Out Movie Review

Leave it to a comedian to make one of the scariest movies in recent memory....

Get Out Trailer

Get Out Trailer

When Chris packs up for the weekend to go and meet his girlfriend Rose's family...

Accidental Love Trailer

Accidental Love Trailer

Alice Eckle is a roller-skating waitress deeply in love with Indiana State Trooper Scott. Before...

Begin Again Movie Review

Begin Again Movie Review

Fans of the Oscar-winning 2006 Irish film Once (and its more recent stage-musical adaptation) may...

Begin Again Trailer

Begin Again Trailer

Dan Mulligan is a former record executive who has just been spectacularly dismissed by the...

Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa Movie Review

Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa Movie Review

The Jackass crew takes an oddly gentle approach here, abandoning their more riotous stunt-based movies...

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Enough Said Movie Review

Enough Said Movie Review

With a strikingly against-type performance from the late Gandolfini, this film gives the romantic-comedy formula...

Captain Phillips Movie Review

Captain Phillips Movie Review

With an attention to documentary detail that makes everything viscerally realistic, this film grabs hold...

Enough Said Trailer

Enough Said Trailer

Eva, a divorced, single mother who faces the impending departure of her soon to be...

Captain Phillips Trailer

Captain Phillips Trailer

Captain Richard Phillips was in command of the US-flagged MV Maersk Alabama cargo ship on...

Captain Phillips Trailer

Captain Phillips Trailer

Captain Richard Phillips never dreamed that his venture on board the US-flagged MV Maersk Alabama...

A Late Quartet Movie Review

A Late Quartet Movie Review

While this film has some bracingly strong observations on the nature of long-term professional and...

The Croods Movie Review

The Croods Movie Review

Cleverly blending a rebellious teen comedy with an animated prehistoric adventure, this witty film wins...

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