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Get Out Review

Extraordinary

Leave it to a comedian to make one of the scariest movies in recent memory. Jordan Peele moves into writing and directing with this offbeat comedy, a fresh and fiendishly smart story with engaging characters and provocative themes. It's a combination of a knowing issue-based drama, lively romantic comedy and unhinged horror that hits all of its targets with precision. And it keeps us gleefully entertained with its escalating terror.

The story centres on Chris (Sicario's Daniel Kaluuya), whose girlfriend Rose (Girls' Allison Williams) invites him home for a weekend to meet her parents Missy and Dean (Catherine Keener and Bradley Whitford). Rose assures Chris that they're so liberal that they won't mind at all that he's black. But things don't feel quite right from the start. For one thing, there are two creepy servants (Betty Gabriel and Marcus Henderson) who seem to be lurking everywhere. And Rose's brother Jeremy (Caleb Landry Jones) revels in stirring up problems. As things get increasingly freaky, Chris calls his best friend Rod (Lil Rel Howery), an airport security officer back in New York, for advice. Then things take an even more bizarre turn when Missy and Dean's friends arrive for an annual party.

Peele begins to play with the audience right from the start, using Michael Abels' disorienting music and Toby Oliver's quirky camerawork to maximum effect. Often this involves pushing us far too close to a character whose behaviour is just a bit off. Every moment is undercut with humour, including awkward moments and snappy gags that serve as a relief valve even as they set us up for something scary. It's such clever filmmaking that we have little choice but to sit back and enjoy the ride. And woven through all of this is an inventive and lacerating exploration of attitudes toward race in American society.

Continue reading: Get Out Review

Get Out Trailer


When Chris packs up for the weekend to go and meet his girlfriend Rose's family for the first time, his biggest concern is that they might not approve of him being a black man. Thankfully, they seem to be accepting, but he's slightly disturbed by a pair of strange black housekeepers that live there named Georgina and Walter. When his pal back home discovers that black people have been going missing from the area for years, he tries to brush it off in order to get through the weekend, but he can ignore it no longer when one of the missing people shows up at a garden party on the estate looking particularly disturbed and warning him to 'get out'. But it's much too late for that now.

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Adam Levine - Begin Again Red Carpet Interview


Video interview with Adam Levine

Maroon 5 frontman Adam Levine talks about making his acting debut in the music comedy 'Begin Again' in which he stars as an emerging musician who ditches his girlfriend in New York to pursue higher career prospects. He stars opposite Keira Knightley, Mark Ruffalo and Hailee Steinfeld in the movie.

'It's surreal because I never had the hankering to be an actor and I don't even consider myself one still - maybe someday I will be', he revealed in a red carpet interview at the Tribeca Film Festival premiere. 'But this was just one of those surprises that I followed and it turned out to be one of the most fun and amazing experiences I've had in my life.'

 

Hailee Steinfeld - Begin Again Red Carpet Interview


Video interview with Hailee Stansfield

Hailee Steinfeld discusses filming in New York and her fellow cast in a red carpet interview during the Tribeca Film Festival premiere of her new movie 'Begin Again', in which she stars alongside Mark Ruffalo, Adam Levine and Keira Knightley.

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'Enough Said' Trailer Released: James Gandolfini's Final Comedy Looks Warm, Smart And Funny


James Gandolfini Toni Collette Catherine Keener Nicole Holofcener

The trailer has been released for Enough Said; a rom-com that will bear a more potent poignancy for those who were fans of the late James Gandolfini, star of The Sopranos. The actor died in June after an unexpected heart attack, whilst on holiday in Rome, but his death didn't mean he couldn't keep entertaining post-humously.

Watch The Enough Said Trailer:

Continue reading: 'Enough Said' Trailer Released: James Gandolfini's Final Comedy Looks Warm, Smart And Funny

Video - Hugh Laurie And Catherine Keener Are Surprised At 'The Oranges' Age Gap Shock


Hugh Laurie and Catherine Keener talk kissing and music during a press junket at New York's Crosby Hotel for their hilarious new movie 'The Oranges'. Hugh, 53, is asked why his onscreen kiss with 26-year-old Leighton Meester has been made into a 'big thing' in America. 'I don't know the answer to that not having seen the kiss itself', he said. 'Is it shocking?' But Catherine chimes in that she's used to seeing that kind of age gap in LA: 'It's pretty much the norm there.'

Continue: Video - Hugh Laurie And Catherine Keener Are Surprised At 'The Oranges' Age Gap Shock

Trust Review


Excellent
Even though this film has a deeply disturbing theme, one of the most frightening things about it is the way it continually threatens to turn into a revenge thriller. But the filmmakers have something much more involving - and wrenching - in mind.

Will and Lynn (Owen and Keener) are parents of three lively, independent-minded kids. Peter (Curnutt) is just heading off to university, 14-year-old Annie (Liberato) is starting high school and Katie (DeButch) is still too young to understand much of what happens next. Annie is chatting online with Charlie, a teen in another city who slowly becomes her closest confidant. So she's a bit startled when he confesses that he's 20. Then 25. Then he agrees to meet her and turns out to be closer to 35 (Coffey). But he loves her and makes her feel beautiful.

Continue reading: Trust Review

Cyrus Review


Excellent
This twisted variation on the romantic-comedy takes a sharply funny look at male relationships. And Reilly and Hill get to shine in extremely vivid characters that keep us both laughing and cringing with fear over what might happen next.

After seven years, John (Reilly) still hasn't got over the break-up of his marriage to Jamie (Keener), but now that she's marrying Tim (Walsh) he really should move on. At a party, he meets Molly (Tomei), an improbably hot woman who actually seems to like his goofy behaviour, and their relationship gets serious very quickly. But Molly's 21-year-old son Cyrus (Hill) isn't quite ready for his mother to settle down with another man and launches a silent campaign to scupper the romance.

Continue reading: Cyrus Review

Catherine Keener - Friday 18th June 2010 at LA Live Los Angeles, California

Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener

Please Give Review


Excellent
Writer-director Holofcener cleverly keeps the emotions gurgling right under the surface of this engaging interpersonal comedy. It's more about smiles than laughing out loud, but the superior cast members get terrific characters to play with.

Kate and Alex (Keener and Platt) are socially active New Yorkers, supporting charities and trying to help their feisty teen daughter (Steele) understand what's important. But Kate's beginning to feel guilty about their work; they buy furniture from families with recently deceased relatives and resell it at a profit. This is taken to the extreme as they wait for their aging neighbour (Guilbert) to die so they can annex her apartment, and Kate and Alex struggle with how to interact with her very different granddaughters (Hall and Peet).

Continue reading: Please Give Review

Cyrus Trailer


John's ex-wife is about to get remarried - John isn't really ready to move on yet. When the down on his luck divorcee finally finds a new 'woman of his dreams' he discovers she has another man in her life, her son Cyrus.

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Please Give Trailer


Kate and her husband Alex own a trendy furniture store on Fifth Avenue; the products they buy come from estate sales. This is just the start of one of the many problems Kate is developing with her way of life. Materialism seems to have become a big part of her life and it also appears her way of life has rubbed off on her teenage daughter. Trying to balance a work and homelife with her husband is also taking a toll - not to mention their old next door neighbour whose flat they want to develop.

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Percy Jackson & The Olyimpians: The Lightning Thief Review


Good
To say this film has heavy echoes of Harry Potter is an understatement.

Although, the Greek-gods premise lets the filmmakers indulge in some visually whizzy sequences that keep this rather lightweight action movie entertaining.

Percy (Lerman) is a New York teen whose mother (Keener) has never told him that his father is the god Poseidon (McKidd) and his best pal Grover (Jackson) is actually a protector satyr. When Zeus (Bean) discovers that his lightning bolt has been stolen, he blames Percy. So Percy has to learn quickly who he is so he can find the lightning thief and restore peace to feuding brothers Poseidon, Zeus and Hades (Coogan). In addition to Grover, he gets help from a professor-centaur (Brosnan) and his fellow demigod Annabeth (Daddario).

Continue reading: Percy Jackson & The Olyimpians: The Lightning Thief Review

Where The Wild Things Are Review


Excellent
Jonze's inventive approach to Maurice Sendak's classic children's book continually confounds our expectations with an approach that's so offhanded and fresh that it might feel awkward or strange. But it's a real grower.

Max (Records) is a mischievous, imaginative pre-teen with a dismissive big sister (Emmerichs) and an understanding mum (Keener). But a series of events get him thinking about the fragility of life, so he takes a flight of fantasy to a distant island populated by furry creatures who at first threaten to eat him but then adopt him as their king. Playful games ensue, as he leads them in the construction of a giant fortress. But even here, relationships become tricky to navigate.

Continue reading: Where The Wild Things Are Review

Catherine Keener Tuesday 13th October 2009 New York premiere of 'Where the Wild Things Are' at Alice Tully Hall - Arrivals New York City, USA

Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener

Where The Wild Things Are Trailer


Watch the Alternative Trailer for new Spike Jonze Movie Where The Wild Things Are

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Catherine Keener Friday 24th July 2009 drinking an iced beverage from Starbucks while at Comic-Con 2009 San Diego, California

Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener

The Soloist Review


Good
Joe Wright's worlds-colliding drama The Soloist has so many strikes against it that it's hard to imagine coming out the other end feeling anything but relief that it was over. Think of it: a based-on-a-true-story about a cold-hearted journalist who meets a mentally disturbed homeless man who just happens to be a world-class musician. Together, the two strike up a unique friendship against the backdrop of Los Angeles's Dickensian skid row and imploding newspaper industry; a bright flower blooming from the crack in a downtown sidewalk. Also, one of the men happens to be black and the other white.

On paper, the treacle-meter for The Soloist is nearly off the charts. But while Wright (Atonement) hasn't fashioned anything like a classic, and the screenplay by Susannah Grant (Erin Brockovich) is frequently thin on motivation, the film is not even close to the disaster that it should have been. This is higher praise than it may sound.

Continue reading: The Soloist Review

Catherine Keener - Monday 20th April 2009 at Paramount Studios Los Angeles, California

Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener

Catherine Keener and family - Catherine Keener and family Los Angeles, Califorina - The Los Angeles Premiere of 'The Curious Case of Benjamin Button' held at the Mann's Village Theatre. - Arrivals Monday 8th December 2008

Catherine Keener and Family

Hamlet 2 Trailer


Watch the trailer for Hamlet 2.

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Synecdoche, New York Review


Weak
If it weren't for Charlie Kaufman, the phrase "famous screenwriter" would be an oxymoron. Kaufman has never won an Oscar, and most people, even true movie geeks, probably couldn't pick him out of a police lineup, but he's the only writer in Hollywood whose name is used to promote his movies. From Being John Malkovich and Adaptation to Confessions of a Dangerous Mind and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, each of Kaufman's movies is a singular experience -- quirky, affecting, and humorous. Kaufman's renown as a screenwriter even surpasses that of Quentin Tarantino's back in the mid-nineties, when he penned a string of critical and box-office hits that included Reservoir Dogs, True Romance, and Pulp Fiction. Tarantino's real acclaim, however, came as a result of his work behind the camera, not the keyboard. So it's no surprise to find Kaufman making the same transition in Synecdoche, New York -- his debut film as a director.

Synecdoche (sih-NECK-doh-kee) is a word whose meaning is too long to type out here -- and isn't essential to understanding the film, anyway. But it's just the type of word you might throw in the title of your first movie as a director if you wanted to let people know in advance they're in for something offbeat. And Synecdoche, New York is nothing if not determinedly offbeat.

Continue reading: Synecdoche, New York Review

What Just Happened Review


Excellent
In Hollywood, hundreds of jobs and millions of dollars can hinge upon a leading man's decision to shave. Just look at Bruce Willis. Not in real life... but in What Just Happened, where Willis appears as himself. In the film, he's been cast in a big movie, but he's put on a few pounds since his last picture, and has decided to grow a shaggy beard.

This doesn't settle well with the studio that's paying $20 million for a man with sex-appeal; they don't want someone who resembles Santa Claus. If Willis doesn't shave and drop some weight, the studio will pull the plug on the movie and sue for damages. But Willis has been growing the beard for six months and wants to make an artistic statement. He's not going to be picking up a can of shaving cream anytime soon.

Continue reading: What Just Happened Review

What Just Happened Trailer


Trailer for What Just Happened

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Synecdoche, New York Trailer


Watch the trailer for Synecdoche, New York

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Hamlet 2 Review


OK
Andrew Fleming's Hamlet 2, a hot potato at this year's Sundance Film Festival which was purchased by Focus Features, takes nothing seriously and that should be taken both literally and pervasively. The humor has an illimitable ardor for defecating on political correctness but it has a similar indifference toward any sort of continuity in filmmaking, storytelling, or style. Written by Fleming and Pam Brady, the film brandishes the sort of overtly offensive, partisan political taunting gags and guffaws that one might find on Comedy Central's South Park, the show Ms. Brady writes for regularly.

In the Mesa high school in Tucson where Fleming sets his gonzo theatrics, culture is either alive-and-well or being beaten to death with a sack full of cantaloupes, depending on who you talk to. The drama department has just finished a stage production of Steven Soderbergh's Erin Brockovich, under the tutelage of Dana Marschz (Steve Coogan). An actor who hit his peak on commercials for herpes medication and Jack LaLanne's Power Juicer (two products that aren't always mutually exclusive), Marschz has moved his wife (Catherine Keener) and random friend Dave (David Arquette) to Arizona to teach acting. It's the first day of the new semester when Marschz finds out that his class has grown from a closeted homosexual (Skylar Astin) and a goody-two-shoes (Phoebe Strole) to an entire class made up mostly of Latino outcasts and some white dude who has a jones for rave culture. It's no small wonder that Marschz's dementia, once goofy and lovable, becomes unstable and leads concurrently to the attempted dismantling of the drama department and the writing of Marschz's titular brainchild, Hamlet 2.

Continue reading: Hamlet 2 Review

Catherine Keener - Friday 23rd May 2008 at Cannes Film Festival Cannes, France

Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener, Michelle Williams and Samantha Morton
Catherine Keener, Michelle Williams and Samantha Morton
Catherine Keener, Michelle Williams and Samantha Morton
Catherine Keener, Michelle Williams and Samantha Morton
Catherine Keener, Michelle Williams and Samantha Morton

Catherine Keener and Calvin Klein Thursday 7th February 2008 Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Fall 2008 - Calvin Klein after party and private dinner held at the Waverly Inn - Arrivals New York City, USA

Catherine Keener and Calvin Klein

Catherine Keener - Sunday 27th January 2008 at Screen Actors Guild Los Angeles, California

Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener

Into The Wild Review


Very Good
One day, you just pack up your essentials in a backpack, do away with all forms of identification, and set off on the road to find that piece of blue sky that's been missing from your puzzle. Such is the task taken on by young Chris McCandless (Emile Hirsch) when he set out in the summer of 1990 hoping to reach the blustery ether of Alaska. Abandoning a life of charm, money, and an equally rebellious sister (Jena Malone), McCandless walked, hitched, and explored America for two years before he died from starvation and partial poisoning on the outskirts of Denali National Park in Alaska.

Four years later, Outside magazine contributor Jon Krakauer documented McCandless' travels in his debut novel Into the Wild, which serves as a blueprint for Sean Penn's adaptation of McCandless' life. Look at me cross-eyed all you want but this tale of "a rebellious 1990s Thoreau" (as the press notes ponder he might be) brings out a buoyancy in director and terminal humbug Penn that's been absent in his filmography thus far. One might think Penn would be more apt to adapt Krakauer's recent Under the Banner of Heaven instead, but his direction in Wild is astute and brisk though not always as concise as one would hope.

Continue reading: Into The Wild Review

Friends With Money Review


Excellent
It's hard to be in L.A. - to live, to visit, to see in movies - and not think that being jaw-droppingly wealthy is the only way to live life. People drive tricked-out cars worth as much as the (astronomical) average housing price and think nothing of tossing away a few hundred on a pair of ripped jeans because they hug the butt just so. This casual relationship with opulence is the setting for Friends with Money, writer-director Nicole Holofcener's (Walking and Talking, Lovely & Amazing) new comedy about how tough the world can be for the haves and the have-mores.Not some "money doesn't solve everything" morality play - if anything, money solves a heck of a lot here - we instead get a more general look at the dissatisfaction and ennui striking women of a certain age, regardless of whether they are rich or not. (But not, apparently, if they are really, really rich - then they get to be happy.) It's familiar ground for Holofcener, whose semi-feminist films always follow a group of women trying to work out a sense of identity at a particular stage of life.So what do these women, walking illustrations of "having it all," have to complain about? Well, for Christine (Catherine Keener, a Holocener mainstay), the problem is her crumbling marriage to an unsympathetic and superior screenwriting partner/husband. Jane (Frances McDormand) is a chichi clothing designer in a life crisis that who quits washing her hair and is sent into fits of apoplectic rage by everyday aggravations in traffic and customer service. It's very baffling to her sweet, sympathetic, and very probably straight husband. Only Franny (Joan Cusack), the wealthiest of the bunch, seems to have a functioning marriage and a deeply satisfying life as a stay-at-home-mom (with full time help, of course - no need to be primitive).And then there is Olivia (Jennifer Aniston); poor, unmarried, childless, house cleaner Olivia. She is likely supposed to be the stunted one, but... it's still Jennifer Aniston; she's hardly a plebe. Olivia has taken to drifting through life, smoking a lot of pot, obsessively stalking a past (married) lover, and letting her current guy degrade mistreat her - and pay for the privilege. The film's title (and casting) suggest that Olivia is meant to be the focus, but her melancholic foundering isn't really given a priority in screen time. It's a good thing, too, considering her passivity doesn't always make her the most interesting.Friends offers little indication how these four women became close, with Olivia so much younger and leading an utterly different life. Franny comments that she isn't certain whether they still would be friends if they met now; but for the other two, there is the feeling they keep Olivia around to maintain a sense of superiority - their lives may be disintegrating, but at least they aren't maids. Olivia clearly has a tendency towards masochism, but at least her friendships offer something to aspire to.That is the crux of the appeal - and potentially off-putting nature - of Holofcener's work: Her women are complicated, troubled, and often inscrutable. They are not always likeable, or fleshed out to minute details, and they rarely experience grand transformations or realizations. But they are always relatable - who hasn't wanted to lash out when someone brazenly cuts in line and totally gets away with it? - and Holofcener writes them brilliantly acerbic and sharp, so her script stays jaunty and blithe (lean, too, at under 90 minutes).It might have no real resolutions to speak of, and male characters are shallowly drawn and peripheral at best, but Friends with Money is the kind of chick flick that offers genuine accessibility instead of rah-rah sisterhood empowerment. And if still working on figuring out who you are when you're already supposed to be a grown up offers no kinship, well, we've all sat awake at night, pondering where to donate that extra two mil so it doesn't burn us at tax time.Friend with monkey.

Living In Oblivion Review


Excellent
Living in Oblivion? You don't know the half of it.

Tom DiCillo wrote and directed this new low-budget story of making a film-within-a-film, and it comes off superbly better than most of its predecessor "movies about movies." DiCillo has assembled the most perfectly matched cast I've come across in ages, featuring Steve Buscemi as Nick, a film director for whom nothing will work out, Catherine Keener as a much too sensitive leading lady, Dermot Mulroney as a leather-clad cinematographer, and James LeGros as an unbelievably shallow leading man--possibly his best role ever.

Continue reading: Living In Oblivion Review

Death To Smoochy Review


Bad
Classic children's television show hosts like Mister Rogers and Barney make great role models for children, but their trite style makes them easy targets for adult jokes. Danny DeVito's latest project, Death to Smoochy, is well-intended with its mockery of children's television and those inane hosts, however it is completely misdirected in its efforts to be funny.

After the obnoxious but popular host Rainbow Randolph (Robin Williams) is caught taking bribes from parents who want their kids on television, network head Frank Stokes (Jon Stewart) pulls the plug on his show. An exhaustive search through the downtrodden Barney wannabes to replace Randolph yields a pink, squeaky-clean rhino named Smoochy (Edward Norton), who becomes an overnight success with the kids despite his preachings of bland politically correct messages to children. Despite Smoochy's best wishes, his boss Nora (Catherine Keener) wants to cash in on the show's newfound success by selling Smoochy-sponsored cereals, cola, and string cheese. Randolph, on the other hand, is hell-bent on making life miserable for the rhino, and Smoochy's crooked agent (Danny DeVito) is busy making backdoor deals trying to sell Smoochy out to the mob.

Continue reading: Death To Smoochy Review

Full Frontal Review


Excellent
For the uninitiated who know Steven Soderbergh only as the auteur behind such delights as Traffic and the Ocean's Eleven remake, know that Soderbergh was once far better known as a god of the indie film scene, the man behind movies like sex, lies & videotape, King of the Hill, and Schizopolis.

Like King of the Hill and the groundbreaking videotape, some of this work is genius.

Continue reading: Full Frontal Review

The 40-Year-Old Virgin Review


OK

In a welcome change from puerile and stinking-rotten Rob Schneider and David Spade movies, "The 40-Year-Old Virgin" is a ribald comedy that is genuinely laugh-out-loud funny, despite being custom-built around a scene-stealing second-banana who really belongs in small roles.

Deadpan "Daily Show" correspondent Steve Carell, who briefly but memorably upstaged Will Ferrell in "Anchorman" and Jim Carrey in "Bruce Almighty," stars as Andy Stitzer, a king-dork electronics store clerk rapidly approaching middle age and so bereft of social skills that he's never managed to get much past first base with a woman. When his co-workers realize this, watching him fumble to fit in while swapping sex stories during an after-hours poker game, they make it their mission to get the poor guy laid.

Co-written by Carell and director Judd Aptow (creator of TV's "Undeclared" and "Freaks and Geeks"), the plot is perfectly pitched to its star's talent for playing hapless, hopeless twits. Put Carell in a polo shirt, a pair of khakis and a K-Mart windbreaker, and he can garner hardy chuckles with little more than a perplexed stare from his deep-set buggy eyes. He dives headlong into this character, earning cheek-hurting laughs with painfully awkward moments (his pals convince him to get his chest waxed) and giving Andy such an authentic geekdom (his apartment is lined with collectable toys in their original packaging) that the movie's plot hardly feels like a gimmick at all.

Continue reading: The 40-Year-Old Virgin Review

The Interpreter Review


OK
Layers of riveting intrigue build toward a finale weigheddown with logistical loopholes in "The Interpreter," a politicalthriller about an assassination plot overheard by a translator (NicoleKidman) at the United Nations.

The circumstances of her accidental eavesdropping are alittle suspect as well -- she just happened to be in a sound booth lateat night, where a microphone inexplicably left on just happened to pickup a conspiratorial conversation in a regional dialect she and only a handfulof others speak outside of the fictional African country of her birth.

Couple this with a covered-up past of rebel activity aimedat the dictator she claims will be targeted during an controversial upcomingaddress on the floor of the U.N., and it's no surprise that the SecretService agent assigned to investigate (Sean Penn) finds her revelationto be dubious at best.

Although the milieu is unusual, "The Interpreter"is largely a variation on a standard Hollywood template about a broodingcop assigned to protect a pretty witness. With a less talented cast anda less interesting director than Sydney Pollack ("Havana," "TheFirm"), it could have easily been dumbed down into an action moviecocktail with a romantic chaser.

Continue reading: The Interpreter Review

S1m0ne Review


Weak

Beneath the uncanny, inevitable and seemingly shrewd facade of the movie-biz farce "Simone" -- about a computer-generated actress taking Hollywood by storm because nobody knows she's not real -- lies a plot cobbled together from largely flat and uncreative moments.

The brainchild of inventive and otherworldly writer-director Andrew Niccol ("Gattaca," "The Truman Show" screenplay), who plucked the picture's concept out of the film industry's paranoid collective subconscious, "Simone" stars Al Pacino as Viktor Taransky, a washed-up and somewhat neurotic director whose last chance at making a big studio film has just walked off the set along with his petulant leading lady (Winona Ryder in a cameo).

But just as he envisions his career going off a cliff, a dying wacko computer genius and Taransky fan (Elias Koteas) brings the director a computer hard drive containing the culmination of his life's work: a program that creates a near-perfect, completely malleable, realistic simulation of beautiful girl. Called Simone (a contraction of Simulation One), in the confines of a computer she can walk, talk, flirt and cry with a single keystroke. She has a database of famous actresses' best performances to draw from for mannerisms and moods. She's utterly at Taransky's control and, of course, her fabricated "performances" can be digitally inserted into any scene of his movie, any way he chooses.

Continue reading: S1m0ne Review

Simpatico Review


Weak

Adapted from Sam Shepard's play about betrayal, blackmail, and a horse racing scam that haunts its conspirators for 20 years, "Simpatico" gets by for a while on a cast full of tense, brutal, benumbed performances.

Nick Nolte stars as Vinnie, a haunted, hard-drinking and fraudulent private eye who has lived a near-destitute existence in Los Angeles for two decades on hush money extorted from a former friend named Carter (Jeff Bridges), his partner in a pony-fixing during their younger days.

As the film opens, Vinnie sets in motion a chain of events designed to see him trade places with Carter, now a rich Kentucky breeder. He plans not only on usurping the wealth his ex-buddy has amassed since their friendship disintegrated, but also on recapturing the cold heart of Rosie (Sharon Stone), the girl that came between them.

Continue reading: Simpatico Review

Catherine Keener

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Catherine Keener

Date of birth

23rd March, 1959

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.73


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Catherine Keener Movies

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Following events in 'The Incredibles' whereby the Parr family defeated the supervillain Syndrome and his...

Get Out Movie Review

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Leave it to a comedian to make one of the scariest movies in recent memory....

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When Chris packs up for the weekend to go and meet his girlfriend Rose's family...

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Alice Eckle is a roller-skating waitress deeply in love with Indiana State Trooper Scott. Before...

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Dan Mulligan is a former record executive who has just been spectacularly dismissed by the...

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Enough Said Movie Review

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Captain Phillips Movie Review

With an attention to documentary detail that makes everything viscerally realistic, this film grabs hold...

Enough Said Trailer

Enough Said Trailer

Eva, a divorced, single mother who faces the impending departure of her soon to be...

Captain Phillips Trailer

Captain Phillips Trailer

Captain Richard Phillips was in command of the US-flagged MV Maersk Alabama cargo ship on...

Captain Phillips Trailer

Captain Phillips Trailer

Captain Richard Phillips never dreamed that his venture on board the US-flagged MV Maersk Alabama...

A Late Quartet Movie Review

A Late Quartet Movie Review

While this film has some bracingly strong observations on the nature of long-term professional and...

The Croods Movie Review

The Croods Movie Review

Cleverly blending a rebellious teen comedy with an animated prehistoric adventure, this witty film wins...

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