Catherine Deneuve

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Paris Fashion Week Haute Couture - 'Jean Paul Gaultier' - Arrivals

Catherine Deneuve - Paris Fashion Week Haute Couture - 'Jean Paul Gaultier' - Arrivals - Paris, France - Wednesday 8th July 2015

Catherine Deneuve
Catherine Deneuve

68th Annual Cannes Film Festival - Opening Ceremony

Catherine Deneuve - A host of movie stars were snapped on the red carpet as they attended the 68th Annual Cannes Film Festival Opening Ceremony in Cannes, France - Wednesday 13th May 2015

Catherine Deneuve

Louis Vuitton "Series 2" The Exhibition

Catherine Deneuve - A variety of fashionable stars were photographed as they attended Louis Vuitton "Series 2" The Exhibition which was held in Hollywood, California, United States - Thursday 5th February 2015

Catherine Deneuve
Catherine Deneuve, Nicolas Ghesquiere and Charlotte Gainsbourg
Catherine Deneuve
Catherine Deneuve
Catherine Deneuve

Jean Paul Gaultier Takes Final RTW Bow At Paris Fashion Week As Coco Rocha Takes A Tumble


Jean Paul Gaultier Coco Rocha Catherine Deneuve

French fashion designer Jean Paul Gaultier has presented his final ready-to-wear collection at Paris Fashion Week, in front of a star studded audience. The show was presented in the designer’s typical eccentric style and featured nods towards many of the most famous creations from his 40 year fashion career.

jean-pauL gaultierJean Paul Gaultier has presented his final ready to wear collection

Using a comical beauty-pageant theme, guests were told that a ‘Miss Jean Paul Gaultier’ was be crowned during the show. The honour eventually fell to 26 year old model Coco Rocha, who had previously suffered a unfortunate tumble during the show.

Continue reading: Jean Paul Gaultier Takes Final RTW Bow At Paris Fashion Week As Coco Rocha Takes A Tumble

71st Venice International Film Festival - '3 Coeurs' - Premiere

Catherine Deneuve - The cast and crew of French drama '3 Coeurs' and other stars hit the red carpet for the movie's premiere at the 71st Venice International Film Festival - Venice, Italy - Saturday 30th August 2014

Catherine Deneuve
Catherine Deneuve
Catherine Deneuve
Catherine Deneuve
Catherine Deneuve

71st Venice International Film Festival

Catherine Deneuve - 71st Venice International Film Festival - '3 Coeurs' - Photocall - Venice, Italy - Saturday 30th August 2014

Catherine Deneuve
Catherine Deneuve
Catherine Deneuve
Catherine Deneuve
Catherine Deneuve

Video - Barbra Streisand Snapped At The Chaplin Award Gala With Michael Douglas And Pierce Brosnan Where She Is To Be Honoured


Oscar and Grammy winner Barbra Streisand is honoured at the 40th Anniversary Chaplin Award Gala at Avery Fisher Hall at the Lincoln Center, New York. Snapped on the red carpet are Streisand herself with husband James Brolin, 'Chicago' star Catherine Zeta Jones and 'One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest' producer Michael Douglas, and James Bond star Pierce Brosnan with wife Keely Shaye Smith.

Continue: Video - Barbra Streisand Snapped At The Chaplin Award Gala With Michael Douglas And Pierce Brosnan Where She Is To Be Honoured

Beloved Review


Weak
Adventurous French filmmaker Honore returns to the musical genre, but this film isn't as buoyant as the wonderful Les Chansons d'Amour (2007). No, this one is dark and rather grim. And it feels about an hour too long.

In 1964 Riems, Madeleine (Sagnier) accidentally begins moonlighting as a prostitute before falling in love with a client, the charming Czech doctor Jaromil (Bukvic). He whisks her off to Prague, until the Russian invasion of 1968 and Jaromil's infidelity drive her back to France with daughter Vera.

Madeleine remarries, but never loses her feelings for Jaromil. Even some 40 years later (now played by Deneuve and Forman), they're meeting in secret, while Vera (now Mastroianni) is struggling with the fact that she has fallen in love with the wrong man (Schneider).

Continue reading: Beloved Review

The Big Picture [L'Homme qui Voulait Vivre Sa Vie] Review


Excellent
An intriguing variation on The Talented Mr Ripley, this French dramatic thriller holds our attention mainly because of the hugely engaging Romain Duris. The plot is a little loose and fragmented, but we can't take our eyes off him.

Paul (Duris) is a successful Paris lawyer living in suburban bliss with his wife Sarah (Fois) and two lively sons (Cacote and Antic). But just as his boss (Deneuve) offers him the chance of a lifetime, Sarah pulls the rug out by asking for a divorce. So Paul confronts the man (Ruf) he holds responsible, and this starts a dizzying journey as Paul makes a series of decisions that change his life completely. Along the way he meets a drunken newsman (Arestrup) and a sexy editor (Katic) who spark even more unexpected actions.

Continue reading: The Big Picture [L'Homme qui Voulait Vivre Sa Vie] Review

Potiche Review


Excellent
A sense of barbed optimism infuses this 1977-set French comedy. Not only does it keep a smile on our faces, but it also quietly says some potent things about old prejudices that still linger in Western society.

Life-loving Suzanne (Deneuve) is married to uptight umbrella factory manager Robert (Luchini). Their daughter Joelle (Godreche) is fed up with her controlling husband, determined not to become a trophy wife like her mother, while their son Laurent (Renier) is marrying someone Robert feels is unacceptable. Meanwhile, the union is on strike for better conditions, and when Robert refuses to give his workers anything, Suzanne starts negotiating with a union-friendly local politician Maurice (Debardieu) with whom she has a past.

Soon the children and Robert's secretary (Viard) are in the middle of a farce.

Continue reading: Potiche Review

The Girl on the Train [La Fille du RER] Review


Excellent
This understated drama really gets under the skin through vivid characters and situations. Finely skilled direction and acting makes it vividly real, like an extremely low-key thriller that grabs hold and won't let go.

Skater girl Jeanne (Dequenne) lives in a Paris suburb with her helpful mum Louise (Deneuve). When meets another skater, Franck (Duvauchelle), their romance develops quickly. And she decides to move in with him rather than take an offered job as a secretary for a legal firm headed by Samuel (Blanc), a renowned specialist in cases involving anti-Semitic violence who has a past connection with Jeanne's parents. But when things go wrong she does something that has severe consequences.

Continue reading: The Girl on the Train [La Fille du RER] Review

The Beaches of Agnes [Les Plages d'Agnes] Review


Excellent
Varda brings a playful attitude to this whimsical stroll through her life, telling stories and showing photos and clips that chronicle both her career and her personal life. It meanders a bit, but it's also thoroughly engaging.

As she celebrates her 80th birthday, the iconic French filmmaker compiles an impressionistic collage of photographs, home movies, new scenes and clips from the classic films she had a hand in. She recounts her career alongside Godard and the Nouvelle Vague, and links her memories together with beaches from near her birthplace in Belgium to Los Angeles by way of Cuba and Cannes. She also installs a beach on a Paris street, occupied by female members of her staff.

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Repulsion Review


Essential
Today's lesson: Don't leave the crazy lady alone with a straight razor.

Roman Polanski's Repulsion has been rightly hailed as a chilling examination of a woman going mad. With unnerving intensity, it places us in the shoes of Catherine Deneuve's fragile beautician, whose unexplained trauma and sexual repression induce bizarre, frightening hallucinations that ultimately drive her to murder. But just as powerful is its notion of an outside world incapable of aiding her. Polanski's penchant for exploring helplessness and indifference has seen more overt expression in other films, but here it forms a haunting counterpoint to the central drama, a statement both on insanity and the banal monstrosities which enable it.

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A Christmas Tale Review


Extraordinary
French director Arnaud Desplechin returns to the U.S. three years after his last domestically distributed picture, Kings & Queen, bearing a gift of another sort in A Christmas Tale. Seeing release approximately a month before the titular holiday, like some Black Friday extravaganza, Desplechin packs all manner of cinematic devices, narrative theatrics, and filmic vernacular into this work of unimaginable generosity.

Only a few days before the sugar plums and wassail are set on the table, Junon Vuillard (Catherine Deneuve), the grand matriarch of a family of lunatics, is diagnosed with a serious case of lymphoma, the same disease that already claimed her eldest son Joseph. The film opens with her husband Abel (Jean-Paul Roussillon) mourning over his son with a startlingly breezy candor. Employing shadow puppets, the lineage of the Vuillard family in its current incarnation is explained, leading to Ivan (Melvil Poupad), the youngest of Junon's children.

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Persepolis Review


Essential
What does one do, or even say, about a film that is, by any measurement that matters, perfect? When considering Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi and Vincent Paronnaud's finely etched animated adaptation of Satrapi's two-part autobiographical graphic novel about growing up in Tehran during the revolution and the Iran-Iraq War, the problem (if one could call it that) becomes particularly acute. By compressing into this film the myriad of themes that it handles, from religious oppression to teenage rebellion to cultural dissonance and war, the filmmakers could have easily encumbered it with a weight that would have outweighed its many sharp delights. But by some strange and fortunate circumstance born out of vision, patience, luck, and sheer unmitigated talent, they have managed to incorporate each of those weighty topics into a work of art that's light as a feather, in the manner of the true masterpiece.

In adapting Satrapi's book for the screen, the filmmakers could easily have gone the route that Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller did with Miller's Sin City, after all, her emotive but simple black drawings would be many times easier to represent in film than, say, the luridly complex and many-colored works of many other graphic artists. But instead of simply replicating what was on the printed page, Satrapi and Paronnaud went to a much more expressive place, choosing instead to keep the spirit and basic look of those dark, simple pages of art, and just add a natural fluidity to it. The frame doesn't move much, leaving one with the impression of looking through a window into another world, where the characters practically float like dancers amid the layered fields of beautifully grey-shaded art, and the mood is grim and poetic. There is little background music or noise except when necessary, eschewing the clouding clutter of a Disney production, with the bright and clear vocals of an early Peanuts film -- and all the heartache-inducing simple truths which that implies.

Continue reading: Persepolis Review

Catherine Deneuve

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