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Eva Marie Saint Discusses Marlon Brando, Cary Grant & Paul Newman On Upcoming TCM Interview


Eva Marie Saint Paul Newman Cary Grant Marlon Brando Alfred Hitchcock Elizabeth Taylor Elia Kazan

Eva Marie Saint's upcoming appearance on TCM on Monday night (31st March) promises to restore our faith in Hollywood. The actress, who will celebrate her 90th birthday in July, has sat down with presenter Robert Osborne in a TCM special which will include an interview about her life and career and three of her best known films.

Eva Saint Marie
Eva Saint Marie discussed her former colleagues in the TCM interview.

On the Waterfront, for which Saint received an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress and starred opposite Marlon Brandon, will kick off the night's festivities at 9pm. Another two of her films, Raintree County (in which she played opposite Montgomery Cliff and Elizabeth Taylor) and North by Northwest (also starring Cary Grant and directed by Alfred Hitchcock) will conclude the evening of celebration.

Continue reading: Eva Marie Saint Discusses Marlon Brando, Cary Grant & Paul Newman On Upcoming TCM Interview

What If Cary Grant Had Played James Bond?


Daniel Craig James Bond Cary Grant Will Smith Christian Bale Michael Fassbender

James Bond fans across the globe are celebrating 007's 50th anniversary today (October 5, 2012), though it's worth remembering that the quintessentially British franchise could have been a very American affair, had Bond producer Albert Broccoli had his way.

As The Guardian's Amanda Holpuch writes, Hollywood icon Cary Grant - best known for 'North by Northwest' - was urged by the producer (also his close friend and best man) to take the role. Despite his English heritage, it's unlikely that British audiences would have taken to Grant as Bond and the role eventually went to the Scotsman Sean Connery, who played the role with aplomb. Bond producers have since chosen Australian, English, Welsh and Irish actors to fill the role, though we shouldn't rule out an American slipping into the tuxedo in the near future. Will Smith had reportedly been close to the role before Daniel Craig took it on, and the heavy American-accented Christian Bale was also tipped to play 007. Australian star Sam Worthington is currently the bookies favourite to land the part after Craig hangs up his shiny black shoes, though it's likely that Michael Fassbender will be a key target for Bond producers. The 'Shame' star was born in German, grew up in the Republic of Ireland and now lives in London.

Anyway, before we start speculating on Craig's replacement, the actor stars in Sam Mendes' 'Skyfall' which hits cinemas on November 9, 2012.


Cary Grant Monday 11th May 2009 Inspirational Woman of the Year Awards at London Marriot Hotel London, England

Cary Grant
Cary Grant

Notorious (1946) Review


Essential
It just doesn't get any more stylish than this. A high point in Hollywood's golden era, Notorious is a convergence of talent. Hitchcock is most "notorious" for psycho-thrillers (i.e. Rear Window, Dial M for Murder, Psycho) but the trademark mind-messing is restrained here, though not completely absent (there is an evil Nazi mother-in-law). Like Hitchcock's later espionage masterpiece North By Northwest, Notorious is sophisticated and entertaining. Uncoincidentally, Cary Grant is front and center in both films.

In Notorious, Grant plays a federal agent, looking for Nazis, who goes to Rio to protect Ingrid Bergman, who is married to a Nazi spy (Claude Rains) and is betraying him. Of course, Grant actually plays the suave, blasé, seemingly ordinary, seemingly heartless character he plays in all other films. Bergman is brilliant as the complex heroine.

Continue reading: Notorious (1946) Review

An Affair To Remember Review


OK
The good thing about being an international playboy who looks and sounds like Cary Grant (well, one of the good things) is that there isn't much you have to do to pay for your fabulous jet-set lifestyle, except marry the occasional filthy-rich heiress (who's hardly bad-looking herself, so that doesn't hurt). So we shouldn't feel too bad for scandal-sheet regular Nickie Ferrante (Grant) when we're introduced to him at the start of the glossy, late-studio-period romance An Affair to Remember, at which point he's leaving behind his French lover, and presumably many years of others like her, in the interest of future security. Nickie's on an ocean liner steaming back to the U.S. to marry the heiress whose financial largesse will keep him in tuxedos and pink champagne for a good many years to come, when he runs into the woman he's fated to fall in love with, Terry McKay (Deborah Kerr), also no slouch in the looks department. But even after the fateful meet cute -- a nicely-framed bit with a cigarette case and some snappy quips -- and all the emotional and moral confusion it causes, there's little reason to feel bad for the guy.

Whether or not one should feel concern for Nickie's state of mind is important here, because director and co-writer Leo McCarey seems to have much more on his mind here than a simple romantic soufflé. The first half of the film takes place almost entirely on the ocean liner, and it's here that the film is at its best. Although both Nickie and Terry have significant others waiting for them on the pier in New York, they can't stop from engaging in some sharp romantic badinage, setting the tongues wagging among their entertainment-starved shipmates. The first sign that the film is moving into different territory, though, is when Nickie goes ashore in France to visit his grandmother and brings Terry along. It's a lengthy and overplayed sequence at a sleepy villa in which Terry, who had previously felt impervious to Nickie's attempts at pitching woo, gets a window into his soul via the grandmother and so falls for him. McCarey also introduces an overtly religious theme here (having Terry and Nickie pray briefly in the chapel) that will come back later in an even more heavy-handed fashion.

Continue reading: An Affair To Remember Review

Holiday Review


Good
Hit-and-miss Hepburn-Grant production, released the same year as Bringing Up Baby but to a considerably less receptive public. That's because many of the jokes in Holiday fall flat, and while Grant has his characteristic grace and charm, the story he's put into with Hepburn (more earnestly grating here than director George Cukor should have allowed) is on the tepid side (involving a love triangle with Grant and two rich sisters). It all comes off as very stagey (it's based on a play) and not very funny at all. Safely skippable unless you're a big fan of the leads.

She Done Him Wrong Review


Good
Mae West's most famous line appears in She Done Him Wrong, where you can finally discover that she's been being misquoted now for 73 years. Poor gal. Did you know she wrote the bulk of the films she appeared in? Who knew under the sneer and the sass there was an author? As for the story here, adapted from her play Diamond Lil, it's pretty much a bust: Nightclub owner Lady Lou (West) is semi-stalked by an old boyfriend who's been in the pokey for a spell. It's all over in about an hour, which serves mainly as a platform for West to crack wise at every boy in the room, including Cary Grant, the recipient of her signature line.

Marlon Brando's Homosexual Celebrity Affairs Revealed


Marlon Brando James Dean Cary Grant Montgomery Clift John Gielgud

Marlon Brando's new biography paints 'The Godfather' actor in a new light, as it reveals how he slept his way around Hollywood. The biography also claims that he slept with some of his male directors and co-stars. The biography, 'Brandon Unzipped', by Darwin Porter claims that the bisexual Academy Award winner engaged in a sexual relationship with James Dean, Cary Grant, Montgomery Clift and Sir John Gielgud.  

Related: 'The Godfather' House Is Up For Sale

In the book, Porter says: "James Dean was one of Brando's most lasting yet troubled gay relationships. They had a relationship for a number of years but it was always turbulent. At one point they had a big stand-up fight at a party in Santa Monica, California, witnessed by dozens of people. His affair with Montgomery Clift was a long and enduring relationship."

Continue reading: Marlon Brando's Homosexual Celebrity Affairs Revealed

The Bishop's Wife Review


OK
The troubles that underlied this production show in the end, with a quirky and vaguely unsatisfying tale of a bishop (David Niven, not very compelling) who receives a guardian angel (Cary Grant, not very angelic) to help him sort out his life, Wonderful Life style. Still, nostalgia for the prior year's feel-goodie probably propelled Bishop's Wife to five Oscar nominations (it won for best sound), though its feel-good sentiment ends up drowning the film in saccharine.

Holiday Review


Good
Hit-and-miss Hepburn-Grant production, released the same year as Bringing Up Baby but to a considerably less receptive public. That's because many of the jokes in Holiday fall flat, and while Grant has his characteristic grace and charm, the story he's put into with Hepburn (more earnestly grating here than director George Cukor should have allowed) is on the tepid side (involving a love triangle with Grant and two rich sisters). It all comes off as very stagey (it's based on a play) and not very funny at all. Safely skippable unless you're a big fan of the leads.

Operation Petticoat Review


Very Good
Pleasantly light comedy has Cary Grant and Tony Curtis on a pink WWII-era submarine with five women who tend to screw everything up. How the sub gets pink and how the chicks get aboard is all the fun. Hilarious for its oh-so-taboo treatment of things like underwear. Watch for Gavin The Love Boat MacLeod in a small role.
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Cary Grant Movies

Notorious Movie Review

Notorious Movie Review

It just doesn't get any more stylish than this. A high point in Hollywood's...

North By Northwest Movie Review

North By Northwest Movie Review

It was with slight disappointment and definite surprise that I found, after years of intending...

Bringing Up Baby Movie Review

Bringing Up Baby Movie Review

Screwball comedy is, in some sense, the most difficult of all types of comedy. Unlike...

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