Carrie Snodgress

Carrie Snodgress

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The Fury Review


OK
Early Brian De Palma horror/thriller takes the Carrie vibe one by putting a government intrigue plot on the heads of its telekinetic teens -- which means people getting killed if they don't play nice. Kirk Douglas shines as the spy father of just such a teen (Andrew Stevens!), while across the globe, Amy Irving is just coming to terms with her powers. Of course, the feds will stop at nothing to control the powers in question. Watchable, but completely hokey (which, of course, is typical of De Palma's films altogether).

The Attic Review


OK
Really kooky movie, with Carrie Snodgress starring as an aging, left-at-the-altar librarian who still lives with her invalid father (Ray Milland, milking it at career's end). Snodgress not only lives a half-fantasy life wherein she's constantly murdering dad, she has a monkey, too, often dressed up as a sailor. Poor Carrie's life goes from bad to worse to totally bizarre, as random encounters take her to one-night stands and vulgar tea-time visits -- and yet all remaining inside a PG rating. Perfectly strange and worth a look... if you've already seen all of David Lynch's movies.

Bartleby Review


Weak
Destined to inspire new lows in workplace slackerdom, Jonathan Parker's Bartleby is a cryptic take on workplace politics and motivation, courtesy of Herman Melville's short story, "Bartleby the Scrivener."

Given a weirdly futuristic spin, Jonathan Parker's interpretation of Bartleby takes him out of a law office and into a public records commission, subtly morphing from typist to file clerk. More notably than all that is Parker's balls-out casting, with the certifiably unhinged Crispin Glover taking the role of the lowest-of-low-key peons.

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The Forsaken Review


Terrible

My favorite part of every modern vampire movie is the inevitable scene in which the vampire leader (if the bloodsuckers are the protagonists) or the vampire hunter (if they're the antagonists) explains to an uninitiated character that all the popular myths about vampires are completely inaccurate.

"Here's the truth" they always say, then go on to explain the vampire rules made up to fit the plot shortcomings of that particular movie.

In "The Forsaken" -- a glossy, gory, half-heartedly hip attempt to remake "The Lost Boys" for the "Coyote Ugly" generation -- the ghouls are little more than Gap models with faded tans. They don't have fangs, they don't have any supernatural powers to speak of, and they're too lazy even to kill with a good old-fashioned bite to the jugular. They generally just shoot their prey and quaff their fill of plasma from the bullet wound. What a bunch of slackers.

Continue reading: The Forsaken Review

Bartleby Review


Terrible

Perhaps I'm too much of a literalist to stomach a thickly ironic, extremely low-budget adaptation of Herman Melville's "Bartleby the Scrivener" set in an eerily sterile modern office. Or perhaps writer-director Jonathan Parker's update of the conceptual tale about a boss driven crazy by an uncooperative employee really is as under-rehearsed and lifeless as it seems to me.

At the center of "Bartleby" is the title character, a meek, withdrawn oddball played by Crispin Glover (the Thin Man in "Charlie's Angels" and George McFly in "Back to the Future") with his quiet, uneasy, string-bean quirkiness turned up full blast. He comes to work as a paper-pusher in a government records office for a fidgety boss (David Paymer) whose subservient existence of sedated equilibrium is thrown for a loop when Bartleby simply stops working one day, answering every order and request with "I would prefer not to."

Before long he's living in the office and spending the better part of each day staring at an air conditioning duct while Paymer goes nuts trying to reason with him.

Continue reading: Bartleby Review

Carrie Snodgress

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