Carole Bouquet

Carole Bouquet

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Carole Bouquet. Jane Campion - 67th Cannes Film Festival - Grace of Monaco - Photocall - Cannes, Cote d'Azur, France - Wednesday 14th May 2014

Carole Bouquet and Jane Campion
Carole Bouquet
Carole Bouquet and Jane Campion
Carole Bouquet
Carole Bouquet
Carole Bouquet and Jane Campion

Leila Hatami, Jeon Do-yeon, Jane Campion, Carole Bouquet and Sofia Coppola - 67th Cannes Film Festival - Jury Photocall - Cannes - Wednesday 14th May 2014

Leila Hatami, Jeon Do-yeon, Jane Campion, Carole Bouquet and Sofia Coppola
Willem Dafoe, Leila Hatami, Nicolas Winding Refn, Jane Campion, Carole Bouquet, Jia Zhangke, Gael Garcia Bernal and Sofia Coppola
Willem Dafoe, Leila Hatami, Jeon Do-yeon, Nicolas Winding Refn, Jane Campion, Carole Bouquet, Jia Zhangke, Gael Garcia Bernal and Sofia Coppola
Leila Hatami
Leila Hatami
Leila Hatami, Nicolas Winding Refn and Carole Bouquet

Carole Bouquet - Carole Bouquet Arriving at Nice Airport - Cannes, France - Tuesday 13th May 2014

Carole Bouquet
Carole Bouquet
Carole Bouquet
Carole Bouquet
Carole Bouquet

'Rosemary's Baby': Critics React To Zoe Saldana's Chilling TV Retake


Zoe Saldana Patrick J. Adams Jason Isaacs Carole Bouquet

The first reviews have been filed for NBC's brand new horror miniseries, Rosemary's Baby, which is inspired by the 1968 Roman Polanski movie of the same name. Zoe Saldana and Patrick J. Adams take the lead in director Agnieszka Holland's modern retelling of the chilling story. Holland's vision takes novelist Ira Levin's tale from New York to Paris but keeps the same basic plot and characters.

Zoe Saldana
Zoe Saldana Plays Rosemary In The NBC Retake Of 'Rosemary's Baby.'

Saldana plays the Rosemary to Adams' Guy, a young couple who are struggling to find somewhere to live, establish their careers and have a baby. Rosemary and Guy find help from seemingly kindly older benefactors Roman Castavet (Jason Isaacs) and his wife, Margaux (Carole Bouquet).

Continue reading: 'Rosemary's Baby': Critics React To Zoe Saldana's Chilling TV Retake

Carole Bouquet - Thursday 1st September 2011 at Venice Film Festival Venice, Italy

Carole Bouquet
Carole Bouquet
Carole Bouquet
Carole Bouquet

Carole Bouquet Thursday 12th May 2011 2011 Cannes International Film Festival - Day 2 - Sleeping Beauty - Premiere Cannes, France

Carole Bouquet
Carole Bouquet

For Your Eyes Only Review


Very Good
As unlikely an adventure as James Bond has ever taken, For Your Eyes Only is one of the better Roger Moore vehicles, thanks to a script that overflows with exotic locales and extreme adventures for our hero to undertake. Eyes features Bond's best ski sequence (from slopes to ski ramp to lodge dining table to bobsled run), one of the best underwater moments (with Bond and his lady friend tied to a boat and dragged through a coral reef), and some of the best Bond-girl skin seen to date. Carole Bouquet even proved to be one of a very few Bond girls who could act, and it's refreshing to see Bond restrain himself from Bibi (Johnson), a young figure skater oblivious to everything but athletics and sex. The "stolen encryption device heading for Moscow" plot is a throwaway, but the real standout is Bond's steeled attitude: his mind clearly renewing his "license to kill," giving us Roger Moore at his most vengeful.

Continue reading: For Your Eyes Only Review

Wasabi Review


OK
Luc Besson regular Jean Reno heads to Japan to reunite with his French-Japanese daughter as he investigates the death of her mother (an old girlfriend). It all ends up rather silly, as bullets and bad guys fly across the screen, and even Reno's natural charm gets shoved under Gérard Krawczyk's attempt to craft a clever cross-cultural action thriller (Beverly Hills Cop goes to Tokyo). Doesn't quite make it.

For Your Eyes Only Review


Very Good
As unlikely an adventure as James Bond has ever taken, For Your Eyes Only is one of the better Roger Moore vehicles, thanks to a script that overflows with exotic locales and extreme adventures for our hero to undertake. Eyes features Bond's best ski sequence (from slopes to ski ramp to lodge dining table to bobsled run), one of the best underwater moments (with Bond and his lady friend tied to a boat and dragged through a coral reef), and some of the best Bond-girl skin seen to date. Carole Bouquet even proved to be one of a very few Bond girls who could act, and it's refreshing to see Bond restrain himself from Bibi (Johnson), a young figure skater oblivious to everything but athletics and sex. The "stolen encryption device heading for Moscow" plot is a throwaway, but the real standout is Bond's steeled attitude: his mind clearly renewing his "license to kill," giving us Roger Moore at his most vengeful.

Lucie Aubrac Review


Weak
Thought a WWII movie couldn't be dead boring? Think again. Lucie Aubrac is the story of the French resistance member of the same name, a woman whose entire job during the war apparently consisted of busting her husband out of jail after repeatedly being caught for stupid offenses against the Nazis. Carole Bouquet as Lucie spends most of her screen time staring defiantly into the camera whilst wearing a stupid hat. Filled with minutaie about resistence members, dates, codes, and more than a little melodrama. Blame the French. I know I do.

Continue reading: Lucie Aubrac Review

That Obscure Object Of Desire Review


Excellent
Pain is a pretty personal thing. Some people avoid it at all costs, while others are inexplicably drawn to it. In Luis Buñuel's That Obscure Object of Desire, the surrealist master's final film, pain becomes the currency of life and love.

The film begins as Matieu, a wealthy widower, boards the express from Seville to Paris and, as the train is pulling from the station, dumps a bucket over the head of a woman who is running after him. His fellow passengers being understandably baffled, Matieu proceeds to explain what led to his action.

Continue reading: That Obscure Object Of Desire Review

Red Lights Review


Excellent
Red Lights consists of a lot of driving, but unlike those trips you took with your folks and their array of Air Supply and Anne Murray cassettes, it's never boring. This movie is a riveting look at manhood and marriage. It's also legitimately frightening.

A Parisian couple in their 40s set off on a lengthy trip to pick up their kids from camp in Southern France. Hélène (Carole Bouquet) is a successful attorney who is a beloved, crucial part of her firm. Antoine (Jeane Pierre Darroussin) works for an insurance company, and it's very apparent that this trip has a very different meaning for him. In the movie's early moments, you see that he's dissatisfied with his role in the relationship. He's waiting on her to arrive; she's the one with the demands. He leaves work without any notice.

Continue reading: Red Lights Review

Lucie Aubrac Review


Good

While Robin Williams will probably score big at the box office this week with yet another cry for respectability in his mediocre Holocaust tragicomedy "Jakob the Liar," a more stirring (and much less manipulative) film about the French underground during World War II also arrived in theaters Friday, and it's a shame this one won't be the big hit.

"Lucie Aubrac" is a fascinating historical and emotional drama, based on "Outwitting the Gestapo," the autobiographical novel of a resistance fighter's wife who became directly involved in undermining the Nazis after her husband's arrest in 1943.

Written and directed by Claude Berri ("Manon of the Spring"), the picture opens with a spectacular maquis bombing of a German train -- which probably cost half Berri's budget -- before settling into Lucie's passionate personal story of adoration and determination during Germany's occupation of France.

Continue reading: Lucie Aubrac Review

The Bridge Review


Good

Carole Bouquet is a cinematic treasure. A gold mine of authentic humanity and emotion, capable of playing a vast range of personalities, and more astonishingly -- yet accessibly -- beautiful at 42 than ever before, she is arguably the best film actress in France today.

So when she plays an adulteress in 1962 Normandy who has an affair with her husband's boss in "The Bridge," there is so very much more to the character than just her cheating heart.

Mina is a woman who is frustrated by the slow evaporation of magic in her marriage. She still loves George, her blue-collar lug of a husband (played by Bouquet's real-life mate Gerard Depardieu). But their relationship has gone from dizzy and passionate to comfortable and polite. In fact, she'd much prefer to lose herself in a record or a good book, or go to the movies -- where emotions are powerful and love is always ardent -- than spend a night with George.

Continue reading: The Bridge Review

Carole Bouquet

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Carole Bouquet Movies

Red Lights Movie Review

Red Lights Movie Review

Red Lights consists of a lot of driving, but unlike those trips you took with...

Lucie Aubrac Movie Review

Lucie Aubrac Movie Review

While Robin Williams will probably score big at the box office this week with yet...

The Bridge Movie Review

The Bridge Movie Review

Carole Bouquet is a cinematic treasure. A gold mine of authentic humanity and emotion, capable...

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