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2015 CFDA Fashion Awards

Carmen Ejogo and Monique Péan - 2015 CFDA Fashion Awards - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 2nd June 2015

Variety's Power of Women: New York luncheon

Carmen Ejogo - Variety's Power of Women: New York luncheon - Manhattan, New York, United States - Friday 24th April 2015

Carmen Ejogo
Carmen Ejogo
Carmen Ejogo
Carmen Ejogo
Carmen Ejogo

Variety's Power of Women

Carmen Ejogo - Variety's Power of Women: New York luncheon at Cipriani Midtown in New York City - New York City, New York, United States - Friday 24th April 2015

Carmen Ejogo
Carmen Ejogo

The 87th Annual Oscars - Red Carpet Arrivals

Carmen Ejogo - Hollywood's biggest stars were snapped on the red carpet as they arrived for the 87th Annual Oscars awards ceremony which was held at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 22nd February 201

Women In Film Pre-Oscar Cocktail Party

Carmen Ejogo - Women In Film Pre-Oscar Cocktail Party at Hyde Sunset Kitchen + Cocktails - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 20th February 2015

Carmen Ejogo
Carmen Ejogo
Carmen Ejogo
Carmen Ejogo
Carmen Ejogo

Selma Review


Essential

One of the finest biopics in recent memory, this drama manages to present someone as iconic as Martin Luther King Jr. as a normal man anyone can aspire to emulate. Anchored by an internalised performance from David Oyelowo, the film is skilfully directed by Ava DuVernay (Middle of Nowhere) with a sharp attention to subtle details. And the script by newcomer Paul Webb draws the characters with such complexity that the film has provoked controversy from people who like their heroes untextured.

The film enters Martin's story as he is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize alongside his activist wife Coretta (Carmen Ejogo) in October 1964, just over a year after his soaring "I have a dream" speech. And a few months later, he's called to Selma, Alabama, to help blacks who are being denied the right to vote by racially motivated voter registration laws. Martin meets with President Lyndon Johnson (Tom Wilkinson), who has more pressing things on his political agenda, then heads to Selma to lead a march on the state capitol in Montgomery. But the peaceful protest is met with nightmarish violence, ordered by Governor George Wallace (Tim Roth). So as the protesters regroup and plan a second march, Martin heads back to Washington to challenge Johnson to set some new priorities.

Cleverly, the script just covers a few months, punctuated with a series of King's most rousing speeches. Since none of this is presented for its big inspirational value, it has a much stronger kick than we expect. The film's punchiest scenes are almost silent, as King struggles to knot his tie before an appearance or fails to find the words to confess his infidelities to his wife. Oyelowo is so transparent in the role that King emerges as an everyday man with a gift for oratory in the right place at the right time. But it's his steely desire to do the right thing that makes him inspirational. And how he reacts when he discovers the human cost of his actions.

Continue reading: Selma Review

Bafta 2015 Nominations Reveal Secrets Of Awards Season


Timothy Spall BAFTA David Oyelowo Tom Wilkinson Carmen Ejogo Tim Roth Jack O'Connell Emily Blunt James Corden Daniel Huttlestone Tracey Ullman

Friday morning's British Academy Film Awards nominations show the predicted BAFTA love for home-grown movies like 'The Imitation Game' and 'The Theory of Everything', but were even more notable for who was missing from the shortlists.

Timothy Spall in Mr Turner
Timothy Spall - snubbed by the academy?

The most obvious snub was for Mike Leigh's acclaimed biographical drama 'Mr Turner', for which Timothy Spall won Best Actor at the Cannes Film Festival. But the film only has a handful of technical nods (for cinematography, production design, costumes and make-up/hair), with nothing for Spall or Leigh, and most surprisingly no British Film nomination.

Continue reading: Bafta 2015 Nominations Reveal Secrets Of Awards Season

Video - Carmen Ejogo Appears At The New York Premiere Of 'Selma' - Part 2


The New York premiere of 'Selma' was held at the Ziegfeld Theatre on 14th December 2014. The red carpet arrivals saw a host of actors and actresses posing for pictures, including English actress/actors spouses Jessica and David Oyelowo. British singer and actress Carmen Ejogo was also in attendance.

Continue: Video - Carmen Ejogo Appears At The New York Premiere Of 'Selma' - Part 2

Video - Sofia Coppola And Jaime King Among Stars At Valentino Sala Bianca 945 Launch - Part 6


Academy Award winning film director Sofia Coppola and 'Sin City' star Jaime King arrived on the red carpet at the Valentino Sala Bianca 945 launch in New York.

Continue: Video - Sofia Coppola And Jaime King Among Stars At Valentino Sala Bianca 945 Launch - Part 6

The Purge: Anarchy Review


OK

After last year's break-out hit thriller, writer-director James DeMonaco is back with the flip-side of the story, which jettisons the irony and and thematic subtlety in favour of in-your-face brutality. This time the account of a night of lawful violence is told from the opposite perspective, poor people who are targeted by sadistic rich people who are trying to cleanse their souls with a bit of grisly murder.

It's set one year later, in 2023 Los Angeles as the annual 12-hour Purge is about to begin. The idea is to cleanse society of its violent urges, but this has turned into an all-out war between heavily armed militias hired by the wealthy to capture poor people for their own homicidal entertainment. As an underground activist (Michael K. Williams) calls for a grassroots uprising, the waitress Eva (Carmen Ejogo) is just trying to get through the night alive with her teen daughter Cali (Zoe Soul). When they're attacked, an unnamed stranger (Frank Grillo) comes to their rescue, and they're soon joined by a couple (Zach Gilford and Keile Sanchez) whose car picked the wrong time and place to break down. Together, these five attempt to escape pursuit by two vicious gangs: lowlife mercenaries looking for fresh blood to sell to wealthy clients and a high-tech army bent on all-out massacre.

It's deeply contrived that these two gangs are deliberately, tenaciously and seemingly supernaturally pursuing these five people, but DeMonaco never flinches, so the audience just has to go with it. Much of the movie consists of massive nighttime street battles, but there are some more deranged interludes that hold the attention much better. At one point, they take refuge in the downtown home of one of Eva's colleagues (Justina Machado), a drunken party that is clearly spiralling out of control even before they arrived. A little later, they are dragged right into a variation on The Hunger Games. And while four of our heroes are running for their lives, Grillo's character has something more violent in mind: he's seeking revenge against the drunk driver who killed his son.

Continue reading: The Purge: Anarchy Review

Hot Tickets! This Weekend's Movie Releases: The Sessions, Paranormal Activity 4, Alex Cross


Helen Hunt John Hawkes William H Macy Tyler Perry Matthew Fox Carmen Ejogo

We’re entering something of a pre-Christmas lull in the land of the blockbuster movie but there is still plenty of activity in the land of cinema this weekend… and not all of it is paranormal.

The film that everyone is talking about this week is The Sessions. The movie – starring Helen Hunt, John Hawkes and William H Macy - debuted at the Sundance Festival earlier this year and wowed the critics with its “profoundly sex-positive” story. The Sessions tells the tale of a man, paralysed by polio, who seeks the help of a priest and eventually a sex therapist, to help him lose his virginity. The performances are touching, the script (based on the writings of California-based journalist Mark O’Brien) is tender and funny. If critical opinion is anything to go by, The Sessions should be heading towards the top of the box office chart.

Continue reading: Hot Tickets! This Weekend's Movie Releases: The Sessions, Paranormal Activity 4, Alex Cross

Sparkle Review


OK

An energetic cast and some terrific music make up for the rather hackneyed plot of this Dreamgirls-style drama. Remade from a 1976 film, the story is that familiar trajectory of musicians who achieve fame only to fall into a string of ugly problems. It's just about watchable, but what makes it notable is that it features Whitney Houston in her last film role.

It's set in 1968 Detroit, where Sister (Ejogo) is determined to become a star. Her singer-songwriter sister Sparkle (Sparks) is the one with real talent, but she's happy to stay in the background with their other sister Dee (Sumpter). As Sister and Her Sisters, they are managed by Stix (Luke), a fast-talking charmer who falls for Sparkle. But the girls' intensely religious mother (Houston) is under no illusions: she has been there, done that and continually warns her daughters that they shouldn't go the same way she did. But of course, they have to live their messy lives themselves.

Since it's such a familiar story, the film has a cheesy, soapy feel to it, playing on the sisters' rebellion against their religious upbringing. Of course, danger is represented in the men they fall for. While good-girl Sparkle tries to keep Stix at arms' length for awhile at least, Sister must choose between two men: the poor but nice Levi (Hardwick) and the flashy but drug-addled Satin (Epps). Since we know that she will choose the wrong guy, we know it's not going to be a happy journey for her. But this trawl through the dark side gives Ejogo a chance to steal the film with a much more emotionally charged performance.

Continue reading: Sparkle Review

Away We Go Review


OK
This gentle comedy examines at how we set priorities, plan our futures and make our families. It's sweet and superficial, but the meandering pace and lively characters make it just about watchable.

Burt and Verona (Krasinski and Rudolph) are a sparky couple looking forward to the birth of their first child. But when Burt's nutty parents (O'Hara and Daniels) announce that they're suddenly moving to Belgium, Burt and Verona realise that nothing is holding them in Colorado. So they hit the road, visiting friends and siblings in Arizona, Wisconsin, Montreal and Miami. In each place, they see things they want for their own family home, but everyone they visit is full of surprises.

Continue reading: Away We Go Review

Away We Go Review


Weak
The fifth film by British theater director Sam Mendes, Away We Go, is the most unkempt movie the director has made so far in his career. It was made while he was still in post-production for last year's excellent adaptation of Richard Yates' Revolutionary Road, a film that was dependent on its form and staginess, and there's a sense that Away was made as a sort of counterpoint not only to the familial dread of Road but also to its style.

It is also the screenwriting debut of the wildly post-modern novelist Dave Eggers and his wife Vendela Vida, novelist and co-founder of literary zine The Believer. Being the recent parents of two children, there's certainly a self-reflexive quality to their script, which tells of the travels of a pair of expecting parents attempting to find a proper home for their awaited progeny.

Continue reading: Away We Go Review

Love's Labour's Lost Review


OK
Film musicals are a tough sell these days. It's either the annual Disney animation vehicle or it's Edward Norton dancing to swing music. I could probably count the last five years worth of decent musicals on my left hand. The juxtaposition of dialogue with song and dance always seems to remind me of the tragedies of my high school drama days. Those damn tights. The bad pancake makeup.

Kenneth Branagh's latest Shakespearean opus, Love's Labour's Lost, falls into the category of an ingenious experiment gone horrible wrong. Like a bartender with one too many vodka-tonics on his breath, Branagh mixes one of Shakespeare's lesser-known comedies with the music of Cole Porter and Irving Berlin and places everything in 1939 France. Think the Rat Pack in some bad 1960s film.

Continue reading: Love's Labour's Lost Review

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