Camryn Manheim

Camryn Manheim

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Return to Sender Review


Weak

This intriguing drama takes on some darkly resonant themes with such an oddly bright and cheerful tone that it forces the audience to pay attention. As it continues, the terrific Rosamund Pike uses conflicting emotions to explore the aftermath of a horrific assault. But while there's growing suspense in the plot, the bigger tension comes from the viewers themselves as they wonder whether it's going to unravel into melodramatic rubbish.

Pike plays Miranda, a cleanliness-obsessed nurse with ambition to get a better job and move to a bigger house, partly to stop her single dad (Nick Nolte) from worrying about her. Then a nurse colleague (Rumer Willis) sets her up on a blind date. William (Shiloh Fernandez) is flirty and sexy, but after he brutally attacks her he goes to prison, leaving Miranda to put her life back together. Surprisingly, she takes a proactive approach that includes contacting William and trying to achieve some sort of reconciliation. Miranda's father is horrified by this, especially when William is released on parole and turns up to help her fix up her house.

This insinuating set-up keeps the audience guessing whether this is a complex look at how people wrestle with the fall-out from a violent rape, or perhaps either Miranda or William are up to something more nefarious. So whether it's sparking hope or dread, it's relatively gripping. And Pike is superb as a quirky woman who continually faces her fears. This includes both connecting with William and trying to befriend her dad's scary dog Benny. "Hating him only hurts me," she says pointedly. Nolte is reliably solid as her wheezy, concerned dad. And Fernandez is utterly magnetic as the mercurial William. All of the characters are defined by rather simplistic filmmaking shorthand, but the actors give them plenty of weight.

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Ray Azoulay, John Carrabino and CAA Celebrates Maria Bello's new book, Whatever Love is Love

Camryn Manheim and Cheri Oteri - Ray Azoulay, John Carrabino and CAA Celebrates Maria Bello's new book, 'Whatever...Love is Love' at Obsolete at Obsolete - Culver City, California, United States - Wednesday 6th May 2015

Camryn Manheim and Cheri Oteri
Camryn Manheim and Cheri Oteri
Camryn Manheim and Cheri Oteri
Elijah Allan-Blitz, Camryn Manheim and Ray Azoulay
Elijah Allan-Blitz, Camryn Manheim and Ray Azoulay

Live Talks Los Angeles with Mario Bello In Conversation with Camryn Manheim

Camryn Manheim and Maria Bello - Live Talks Los Angeles with Mario Bello In Conversation with Camryn Manheim at the Aero Theater at Aero Theatre - Santa Monica, California, United States - Tuesday 5th May 2015

Camryn Manheim, Clare Munn and Elijah Allan-Blitz
Camryn Manheim, Clare Munn and Elijah Allan-Blitz
Camryn Manheim, Clare Munn and Elijah Allan-Blitz
Camryn Manheim, Clare Munn and Elijah Allan-Blitz
Bibiana Mbuchi, Camryn Manheim, Tindy Mbuchi and Guests

Gold Meets Golden at Equinox Sports Club

Camryn Manheim - Celebrities attends 3rd annual "Gold Meets Golden" at Equinox Sports Club - West LA Flagship Lounge. at Equinox Sports Club – West LA Flagship Lounge - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 21st February 2015

Camryn Manheim
Camryn Manheim

3rd Annual Saving SPOT! Dog Rescue Benefit

Camryn Manheim - A variety of dog loving stars were photographed as they arrived at the 3rd Annual Saving SPOT! Dog Rescue Benefit held in Santa Monica, California, United States - Sunday 26th October 2014

Camryn Manheim

Opening night of 'King Lear' - Arrivals

Camryn Manheim - Opening night of 'King Lear' held at the Delacorte Theater - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 5th August 2014

Slipstream Review


Grim
"It means everything and it means nothing at all. Life is so illusion-like, so dreamlike, that I think it's all a dream... a dream within a dream. What is real? What is fantasy? You grasp this moment and then, suddenly, it's gone. I was talking 10 minutes ago, but that's all gone..."

Isn't it funny that if a stockbroker said that, his friends and family would question his psychiatric health and advise him to find profession help, but when a 69-year-old Academy Award winner says that, he not only gets a movie made, but attracts a renowned cast and crew boasting a combined total of more than 250 awards, honors, and nominations?

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Marilyn Hotchkiss Ballroom Dancing & Charm School Review


Weak
So here's the scoop: In 1990, a novice director named Randall Miller made a 30-minute short film called Marilyn Hotchkiss' Ballroom Dancing and Charm School, about the titular academy for young children who learn to dance and be polite, etc. An amazing 15 years later, after paying his dues on films like Houseguest and H-E Double Hockey Sticks and TV shows like Popular, he figured he'd take that short, add an hour to it (which takes place 40 years later), and mix it up into a film called Marilyn Hotchkiss Ballroom Dancing & Charm School. (You see, he lost an apostrophe and an "and" but gained an ampersand.)

That's some dedication to your story, but it turns out that neither the original Hotchkiss nor the updated one merit that much consideration. The short is your expected coming-of-age tale: A kid named Steve hates girls, but over time (and thanks to Hotchkiss) he comes to love them, particularly a gal named Lisa.

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Twisted Review


Unbearable
Few cities on earth make for a better backdrop for murder mysteries than San Francisco. Its naturally spooky features - the fog-shrouded skyline, the damp city streets, and the massive bay - are all instant mood setters. It's the ultimate studio backlot. And yet, it amazes me that the thriller Twisted wastes all of the suspense and atmosphere that is so intrinsic in the San Francisco surroundings.

Ashley Judd plays newbie homicide detective Jessica Shepard, a former street beat cop whose quick rise in the department is due to her connections with the police commissioner John Mills (Samuel L. Jackson). When Shepard's parents were killed in a murder-suicide decades before, Mills (who was Shepard's father's former partner) became Shepard's surrogate father and mentor. She still struggles with the death of her family today and attends mandated counseling sessions with Dr. Melvin Frank (David Strathairn). Yet, despite the professional help, she drinks heavy doses of alcohol, sleeps with any man she finds at a bar, and fights with fellow detectives.

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What Planet Are You From? Review


Grim
It's always a shame to see great comedic minds fall so far from the mark. Garry Shandling is a funny man. Just check out any episode of The Larry Sanders Show. He has a wonderfully dry wit and is downright hilarious without drawing overt attention to himself. I just want to know what the hell happened to What Planet are You From?

Simple story line: Alien must come to Earth and impregnate female human being to establish future dominance of his planet's race. Comedic premise: Alien must learn how to communicate to female human beings. Comedy rolls on: Alien encounters and makes ass of himself to female human beings. Comedy continues: Alien tracked by rogue FAA agent. Comedy continues even more: Alien meets female human and falls in love. Cue drama. That's about it.

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Scary Movie 3 Review


OK
There are lots of ways to churn out sequels, particularly comedies. You can speed along like a runaway train to capitalize on a surprise hit -- Miramax rushed Scary Movie 2 into theaters one year after the original's release -- or you can reset and go for broke. The latter approach seems to be the Scary Movie 3 motive, with new writers and veteran parody director David Zucker (Airplane!, The Naked Gun) joining the fray. For its efforts, Miramax gets a perfectly average movie, with fresh moments, lame retreads, and more opportunity for big box office.

Scary Movie 3 sticks with the program: mind-bogglingly dumb characters hustle their way through spoofs of the industry's most popular recent films. It's no mistake that the roasted movies -- in this case: Signs, The Ring, and 8 Mile -- all pull in huge money and attract a young audience.

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The 10th Kingdom Review


Good
Want to visit this mysterious 10th Kingdom? You're soaking in it.

A seven-hour epic miniseries now released on DVD (and that's with the commercials cut out), The 10th Kingdom is a hit-and-miss affair. Through a pure contrivance, we find our heroes, the lovely Kimberly Williams and John Larroquette, playing her father, whisked into "the nine kingdoms," an amalgam of fairy tales all rolled up into one crazy place. They are simply trying to escape back to New York -- but if they save the kingdom along the way, all the better.

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Wide Awake Review


Weak
Best known for dazzling us with The Sixth Sense, M. Night Shyamalan hit the big screen most recently with this perplexing dud, also about a kid with semi-mystical powers. Wide Awake is not nearly so fascinating as Sense, as it follows the story of a kid who misses his dead grandpa so much he seeks answers about grandpa's well-being from all the religions in the world. Not nearly as interesting as it could have been, Wide Awake quickly provokes yawns and smirks over its cutesy treatment of death.

Dark Water (2005) Review


Good
As perhaps a concession to the modern age, the haunted-house story Dark Water is set not in some gloomy old mansion but in the claustrophobic confines of a dank apartment building, and it's all the better for it. But in many other ways the film is a fairly classic scary story, albeit one that heightens a mood of mournfulness over incessant spine-straightening scares. Fresh off the wide acclaim for his young Che Guevara travelogue The Motorcycle Diaries, director Walter Salles seems an odd choice for this, his first Hollywood project. But it's a similar transition to that taken by another South American, Alejandro Amenábar, who he came to Hollywood and made The Others, another solidly classical spooker gussied up with sharp talent and moody atmospherics.

And Dark Water (a remake of Hideo Nakata's 2002 film Honogurai mizu no soko kara) is nothing if not moody. It begins in the gloom of a divorce, with just-separated Dahlia (Jennifer Connelly) and Kyle (Dougray Scott) fighting over who is going to live where - shared custody of their young girl Ceci (Ariel Gade) making commuting a big issue. Righteously furious Dahlia needs a cheap place near a good school and so ends up looking at a place on Roosevelt Island, the apartment-block-choked strip of land in the East River that makes most Manhattanites shudder and think, "There but for the grace of my broker, go I..." She and Ceci tour a grim apartment there with a chatty manager (a spot-on John C. Reilly) who tries to talk up the depressing view of rain-shrouded towers and smokestacks and the building's neo-Fascist architecture; only Reilly could say "Brutalist" with such perfectly smarmy cheer.

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David Searching Review


Grim
A young gay man is looking for purpose, happiness, and maybe even love in David Searching, but this low-energy no-budget effort never really takes flight. Why can't David (Anthony Rapp) find a soul mate? Maybe because he's such a self-obsessed sad sack.

A wannabe documentary filmmaker with no real current job, twentysomething David is both shy and repressed and quite unable to make it in the New York gay dating scene. He's a small fish in a very big and barracuda-filled pond. David gets most of his help and moral support from the fat and jolly Gwen (Camryn Manheim), who fills the film's obligatory fag hag slot and who is also seeking some peace of mind as her marriage unravels. David takes her in as his roommate so she's always to provide a wisecrack or a pat on the back.

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Camryn Manheim

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